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Oregon Bulletin

November 1, 2012

Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, Chapter 437

Rule Caption: Adopt changes in Agriculture; Division 4/I and 4/Z.

Adm. Order No.: OSHA 4-2012

Filed with Sec. of State: 9-19-2012

Certified to be Effective: 1-1-13

Notice Publication Date: 5-1-2012

Rules Adopted: 437-004-9626

Rules Amended: 437-004-1005, 437-004-1020, 437-004-1030, 437-004-1035, 437-004-1041, 437-004-1050, 437-004-1060, 437-004-1070, 437-004-1075, 437-004-9000, 437-004-9050, 437-004-9090, 437-004-9600, 437-004-9620, 437-004-9640, 437-004-9650, 437-004-9710, 437-004-9740, 437-004-9760, 437-004-9780, 437-004-9830, 437-004-9850, 437-004-9860

Subject: Oregon OSHA proposed changes to Agriculture, Division 4/A General Subjects; 4/B Definitions; 4/I Protective Equipment; and 4/Z Chemical/Toxins. We removed subdivisions A and B from this current rulemaking action. Three public hearings were held in June 2012 with no comments received for proposed changes to subdivisions I and Z. Oregon OSHA adopts one new rule in Division 4/Z, one new appendix in Division 4/I, and amends 23 existing rules in Division 4/I and 4/Z.

 Subdivision I modifies the requirements for employers providing Personal Protective Equipment to include an evaluation of the hazards. A new non-mandatory appendix to Subdivision I provides a template for employers to use in this evaluation. Also, training requirements are specified for employees using general PPE. The format of the rules for PPE for parts of the body (head, eyes and face, hands and feet) is simplified and the requirements are aligned with the requirements in the Division 2 rules.

 The format is standardized in the rules for Subdivision Z (Chemicals and Toxins.) The Division 4 Air Contaminant rules are updated to match the Division 2 Air Contaminant rules. The substance-specific rules make clear that either the Division 2 or Division 3 rules apply, depending on the type of activity, if there is an exposure to these toxins.

 Please visit our website www.orosha.org

 Click ‘Rules/Compliance’ in the left vertical column and view our proposed, adopted, and final rules.

Rules Coordinator: Sue C. Joye—(503) 947-7449

437-004-1005

General Requirements for Protective Equipment

(1) Definitions.

(a) Contaminants – include any substance that can cause illness or physical harm to a person by contact with or entry into the body. Examples include dust in the air and pesticide residues in water.

(b) Hazards – include chemicals, contaminants, and energy sources that are present in the workplace environment in a way that can cause injury to, or functional impairment of, any part of the body through absorption, inhalation or physical contact.

(c) Personal protective equipment (PPE) – includes anything worn or used for protecting a person from hazards.

(2) Hazard assessment and protective equipment selection.

NOTE: This section applies to protective equipment not covered in OAR 437-004-1041 (Respiratory Protection) or OAR 437-004-0630 (Noise Exposure).

(a) The employer must assess the workplace to determine if hazards are present, or are likely to be present, that would make the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) necessary to protect employees.

(b) If such hazards are present, or likely to be present, the employer must:

(A) Select, and ensure that each exposed employee use, the types of PPE that will protect them from the hazards identified in the hazard assessment;

(B) Communicate PPE selection decisions to each exposed employee; and,

(C) Select PPE that properly fits each exposed employee.

NOTE: Nonmandatory Appendix A to Subdivision I provides a sample hazard assessment procedure.

(3) Payment for protective equipment.

(a) Except as in paragraphs (3)(b) through (3)(e), employers must provide, at no cost to the employee, all protective equipment, including personal protective equipment (PPE). For purposes of this rule, employees of labor contractors, labor leasing companies and temporary labor providers are the employees of the using employer. The using employer must supply PPE in compliance with this rule.

Note: When another Oregon OSHA standard specifies that the employer must pay for protective equipment, that standard applies over this one.

(b) Employers do not have to pay for non-specialty safety-toe protective footwear (including steel-toe shoes or steel-toe boots) and non-specialty prescription safety eyewear, if the employer allows employees to wear the items off the job site.

(c) When employers provide metatarsal guards and allow the employee, to use shoes or boots with built-in metatarsal protection, employers do not have to reimburse the employee for the shoes or boots.

(d) Employers do not have to pay for:

(A) Everyday clothing, such as long-sleeve shirts, long pants, street shoes, and normal work boots; or

(B) Ordinary clothing, skin creams, or other items, used solely for protection from weather, such as winter coats, jackets, gloves, parkas, rubber boots, hats, raincoats, ordinary sunglasses, and sunscreen.

(e) Employers must pay for replacement PPE, except when the employee has lost or intentionally damaged the PPE.

NOTE: Employees must not be allowed to work in hazardous conditions without the appropriate PPE.

(f) Where an employee provides their own protective equipment the employer does not have to reimburse the employee for that equipment. (Also see paragraph (4))

(4) Employees’ equipment. If employees provide their own protective equipment, the employer is responsible to ensure that it is adequate and is right for the job and hazards.

(5) Equipment inspection, maintenance, and storage. Do not allow workers to use defective or damaged personal protective equipment. All protective equipment, whether furnished by the employer or provided by the employee, must be maintained in a sanitary and reliable condition.

(6) Skin protection. Where needed, provide and require the use of protective coverings, such as aprons, ointments, gloves, or other effective protection to employees exposed to materials or conditions that are hazardous to their skin.

(7) Follow manufacturer’s instruction. Require employees to wear and use personal protective equipment according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

(8) Watches and jewelry. Employees working where they might contact moving parts of powered machinery or live parts of electrical equipment, must not be allowed to wear rings, watches, earrings, bracelets or other things that could cause a hazard.

(9) Control hazards first. Contain or eliminate hazards at the source by using administrative or engineering controls. Personal protective equipment is appropriate when these types of controls are not feasible or where there are still hazards.

(10) Training.

NOTE: This section applies to protective equipment not covered in OAR 437-004-1041 (Respiratory Protection) or OAR 437-004-0630 (Noise Exposure).

(a) The employer must provide training to each employee who is required to use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). that includes at least the following:

(A) When PPE is necessary;

(B) What type of PPE is necessary;

(C) How to properly put on, take off, adjust, and use the PPE;

(D) The limitations and useful life of the PPE; and,

(E) The proper care, maintenance, storage and disposal of the PPE.

(b) Each affected employee must demonstrate an understanding of the training specified in paragraph (10)(a) of this section, and the ability to use PPE properly, before being allowed to perform work requiring the use of PPE.

(c) When the employer has reason to believe that any affected employee who has already been trained does not have the understanding and skill required by paragraph (10)(a) of this section, the employer must retrain that employee. Circumstances where retraining is required include:

(A) When changes in the workplace make previous training obsolete;

(B) When changes in the types of PPE to be used make previous training obsolete;

(C) When deficiencies in an affected employee’s demonstrated knowledge or use of assigned PPE indicate that the employee has not retained the required understanding or skill.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 5-2008, f. 5-1-08, cert. ef. 5-15-08; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-1020

Personal Fall Protection

NOTE: The general requirements for Protective Equipment in 437-004-1005 apply to Personal Fall Protection.

(1) Definitions. Competent person — is a person who because of training and experience, can identify existing and predictable hazards in equipment, material, conditions or practices and who has the knowledge and authority to take corrective steps. Lanyard — A flexible line connected at one end to a body belt or harness and at the other end to an anchorage. Personal fall arrest system means a system used to stop an employee in a fall from a working level. It consists of an anchorage, connectors, body harness and may include a lanyard, deceleration device, lifeline, or suitable combinations of these. Personal fall protection systems include arrest systems, restraint systems or positioning device systems. Personal fall restraint system means a fall protection system that prevents the user from falling any distance. The system is comprised of either a body belt or body harness, along with an anchorage, connectors and other necessary equipment. The other components typically include a lanyard, and may also include a lifeline and other devices. Positioning device system means a body belt or body harness system rigged to allow an employee to be supported on an elevated vertical surface, such as a wall, and work with both hands free while leaning. Qualified person — is a person who has a recognized degree, certification, professional standing, knowledge, training or experience; and has successfully demonstrated the ability to perform the work, or solve or resolve problems relating to the work, subject matter, or project.

(2) Protect all employees from falls when working:

(a) On unguarded surfaces more than 10 feet above a lower level; and

(b) Above open pits, tanks or dangerous equipment at any height.

NOTE: The requirements to protect employees from falls when working on unguarded surfaces more than 10 feet above a lower level does

NOT apply when the work is of limited duration and limited exposure, and it is equally or more hazardous to set up or use a fall protection system. Examples include work on haystacks, stacked silage, and stacked Christmas trees in open, outdoor areas.

(3) Personal fall protection systems must use:

(a) Lanyards and vertical lifelines that have a minimum breaking strength of 5,000 pounds.

(b) Connectors that are drop forged, pressed or formed steel, or equivalent materials.

(c) Connectors that have a corrosion-resistant finish, and with smooth surfaces and edges to prevent damage to interfacing parts of the system.

(d) Dee-rings, snap hooks or carabiners that have a minimum tensile strength of 5,000 lbs. and that are proof-tested to a minimum tensile load of 3,600 pounds without cracking, breaking, or taking permanent deformation.

(e) Snap hooks and carabiners that are self-locking or double-locking and sized to be compatible with the member to which they are connected.

(4) Use lifelines, body belts or safety harnesses and lanyards only for the purpose they were intended. Remove fall protection equipment from service after it has been subjected to a load.

(5) Anchorages:

(a) Anchorages used for attachment of personal fall arrest equipment must be capable of supporting at least 5,000 pounds per employee attached, or must be designed, installed, and used as follows:

(A) Under the supervision of a qualified person; and

(B) As part of a complete personal fall arrest system which maintains a safety factor of at least two.

(b) Anchorages used for attachment of personal fall restraint or positioning device systems must be capable of supporting 3000 lbs. per employee attached, or be designed, installed and used as follows:

(A) Under the supervision of a qualified person; and

(B) As part of a complete personal fall restraint or positioning device system which maintains a safety factor of at least two.

(6) Horizontal lifelines must be designed, installed, and used, under the supervision of a qualified person, as part of a complete personal fall arrest system, which maintains a safety factor of at least two.

(7) Fall arrest and fall restraint systems.

(a) Fall arrest systems must be rigged so that an employee can neither free fall more than 6 feet, nor contact any lower level.

(b) Fall arrest systems, when stopping a fall, must limit maximum arresting force on an employee to 1,800 pounds

(c) Fall arrest systems must bring an employee to a complete stop and limit maximum deceleration distance an employee travels to 3.5 feet.

(d) Fall restraint systems must be rigged to prevent the user from falling any distance.

(e) Positioning device systems must be rigged such that an employee cannot free fall more than 2 feet.

(8) Personal fall protection systems must be inspected by a competent person prior to each use for wear, damage and other deterioration, and defective components must be removed from service.

(9) When employees use personal fall arrest systems, the employer must provide for prompt rescue of employees in the event of a fall or ensure that employees are able to rescue themselves.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-1030

Work Clothing

(1) General requirements. Ensure that employees:

(a) Wear clothing that provides adequate protection for the hazards of the work.

(b) Do not wear loose sleeves or other loose clothing when near enough to be caught in moving parts of machinery.

NOTE: See Divisions 4/O and 4/P for equipment and tool guarding requirements.

(c) Do not wear clothing soaked with flammable liquids or contaminated with other hazardous substances.

NOTE: See Subdivision 4/P, 437-004-2230 for requirements for PPE while using chain saws.

(2) High visibility garments.

(a) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or work assigned will expose emloyees to hazards caused by on-highway type moving vehicles in work zones and street or highway traffic.

(b) Work that exposes employees to these hazards must comply with Division 2/I, 437-002-0134(7) High Visibility Garments.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 9-2006, f. & cert. ef. 9-22-06; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-1035

Eye and Face Protection

NOTES: See Division 4/Q, 437-004-2310(6) for the protective equipment requirements for welders in agricultural workplaces.

See Division 4/W, 437-004-6000, 170.240(c)(7) for the protective eyewear requirements for pesticide handlers.

(1) General requirements. Employers must:

(a) Provide and require the use of eye or face protection that protects employees from hazards such as flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids or caustic materials, gases and vapors, electrical hazards, or potentially harmful light radiation.

(b) If an employee wears prescription lenses while doing work that involves eye or face hazards, either provide protective equipment that incorporates the prescription lenses or provide protective equipment that can be worn over the prescription lenses in a way that does not disturb the proper position of either the prescription lenses or the protective equipment.

(c) Require employees to use eye or face protection with side protection when there is a hazard from flying objects. Detachable side protectors on safety glasses (such as, clip-on or slide-on side shields) are acceptable if they offer adequate protection from the hazard.

(d) Eye and face protection equipment must be clean and in good repair.

(2) Criteria for protective eye and face devices.

(a) Protective eye and face protection devices must comply with any of the following consensus standards:

(A) ANSI Z87.1-2003, “American National Standard Practices for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection;”

(B) ANSI Z89.1-1997, “American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection;”

(C) ANSI Z89.1-1986, “American National Standard for Personnel Protection — Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers – Requirements.”

NOTE: The Oregon OSHA Resource Center has copies of these standards for public review at 350 Winter Street NE, Salem OR.

(b) Protective eye and face protection devices that the employer demonstrates are at least as effective as protective eye and face protection devices that are constructed in accordance with one of the consensus standards will be deemed to be in compliance with the requirements of this section.

(3) Laser protection.

(a) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or work assigned will expose employees to laser light beams.

(b) Work that exposes employees to laser light beams must be furnished laser safety goggles which will protect for the specific wavelength of the laser and be of optical density adequate for the energy involved.

[Publications: Publications referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 2-2010, f. & cert. ef. 2-25-10; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-1041

Respiratory Protection

(1) Permissible practice.

(a) To control occupational diseases caused by breathing contaminated air, the best method is to prevent contamination with engineering controls. To the extent feasible, accepted engineering controls must be used. Examples of engineering controls include enclosing the source of contamination, providing general or local exhaust ventilation to remove the contaminated air from work areas, and substituting less toxic materials. When this approach is not feasible, or while engineering controls are being established, employers must provide appropriate respirators in compliance with this standard.

(b) You must provide a respirator to each employee when it is necessary to protect their health. Respirators must be appropriate for the hazard. You must also establish and maintain an effective respiratory protection program that includes at least the requirements outlined in paragraph (3) of this standard. The program must cover each employee required to use a respirator.

(2) Definitions. The following definitions apply to this standard. Air-purifying respirator is a respirator with an air-purifying filter, cartridge, or canister that removes specific air contaminants by passing ambient air through the air-purifying element. Assigned protection factor (APF) means the workplace level of respiratory protection that a respirator or class of respirators is expected to provide to employees when the employer implements a continuing, effective respiratory protection program as specified by this section. Atmosphere-supplying respirator is a respirator that supplies the user with breathing air from a source independent of the ambient atmosphere, and includes supplied-air respirators (SARs) and self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) units. Canister or cartridge is a container with a filter, sorbent, or catalyst, or combination of these items, that removes specific contaminants from the air passed through the container. Competent person is a person who, because of training and experience, can identify existing and predictable hazards in equipment, material, conditions or practices and who has the knowledge and authority to take corrective steps. Demand respirator is an atmosphere-supplying respirator that admits breathing air to the face piece only when inhalation creates a negative pressure inside the face piece. Elastomer (elastomeric) is an elastic substance like rubber or neoprene. Emergency situation is any event such as, but not limited to, equipment failure, rupture of containers, or failure of control equipment that may or does result in an uncontrolled significant release of an airborne contaminant. Employee exposure is exposure to a concentration of an airborne contaminant that would occur if the employee were not using respiratory protection. End-of-service-life indicator (ESLI) is a device, on the cartridge, that warns respirator users when their respirator is near the end of its ability to protect them. For example, an indicator on the cartridge will change to warn the user that the cartridge sorbent material is nearing saturation and is no longer effective. Engineering control measures are methods to eliminate or control employee exposure to the hazard; e.g., substitution of a less toxic material, general or local ventilation and enclosing the operation. Escape-only respirator is a respirator only for use during emergency exit. Filter or air purifying element is a respirator component (e.g., canister or cartridge) that removes solid or liquid aerosols from the inspired air. Filtering face piece (dust mask) is a tight fitting negative pressure particulate respirator with a filter as an integral part of the face piece or with the entire face piece made of the filtering medium. Fit factor is a quantitative estimate of the fit of a particular respirator to a specific person, and typically estimates the ratio of the concentration of a substance in ambient air to its concentration inside the respirator when worn. Instrumentation is used with ambient air as the “test agent” to quantify the respirator fit. See Appendix A. Fit test is the use of procedures in Appendix A to qualitatively or quantitatively evaluate the fit of a respirator on a person. (See also Qualitative fit test QLFT and Quantitative fit test QNFT.) Helmet is a rigid respirator covering that also provides head protection against impact and penetration. High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter is a filter that is at least 99.97 percent efficient in removing monodisperse particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter. The equivalent NIOSH 42 CFR 84 particulate filters are the N100, R100, and P100 filters. Hood is a respirator covering that completely covers the head and neck and may also cover portions of the shoulders and torso. Immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) is an atmosphere that poses an immediate threat to life, would cause irreversible adverse health effects, or would impair an individual’s ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere. Interior structural firefighting is the physical activity of fire suppression, rescue or both, inside of buildings or enclosed structures which are involved in a fire situation beyond the incipient stage. Loose-fitting face piece is a respiratory covering that forms a partial seal with the face, e.g., hood. Maximum use concentration (MUC) means the maximum atmospheric concentration of a hazardous substance from which an employee can be expected to be protected when wearing a respirator, and is determined by the assigned protection factor of the respirator or class of respirators and the exposure limit of the hazardous substance. The MUC can be determined mathematically by multiplying the assigned protection factor specified for a respirator by the required OSHA permissible exposure limit, short-term exposure limit, or ceiling limit. When no OSHA exposure limit is available for a hazardous substance, an employer must determine an MUC on the basis of relevant available information and informed professional judgment. Negative pressure respirator (tight fitting) is a respirator in which the air pressure inside the face piece is negative during inhalation with respect to the ambient air pressure outside the respirator. Oxygen deficient atmosphere is an atmosphere with an oxygen content less than 19.5 percent by volume. Physician or other licensed health care professional (PLHCP) is a person whose legally permitted scope of practice (i.e., license, registration, or certification) allows them to independently provide, or be delegated to provide, some or all of the health care services required by this standard. Positive pressure respirator is a respirator in which the pressure inside the respiratory covering is higher than the air pressure outside the respirator. Powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) is an air-purifying respirator that uses a blower to force the ambient air through air-purifying elements to the inlet covering. Pressure demand respirator is a positive pressure atmosphere-supplying respirator that admits breathing air to the face piece when inhalation reduces the positive pressure inside the face piece. Qualitative fit test (QLFT) is a pass/fail fit test to assess the adequacy of respirator fit that relies on the individual’s response to the test agent. See Appendix A. Quantitative fit test (QNFT) is an assessment of the adequacy of respirator fit by numerically measuring the amount of leakage into the respirator. See Appendix A. Respirator covering is that part of a respirator that forms the protective barrier between the user’s respiratory tract and an air-purifying device or breathing air source, or both. It may be a face piece, helmet, hood, suit, or a mouthpiece respirator with nose clamp. Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) is an atmosphere-supplying respirator for which user carries the breathing air source. Service life is the period of time that a respirator, filter or sorbent, or other respiratory equipment adequately protects the wearer. Supplied-air respirator (SAR) or airline respirator is an atmosphere-supplying respirator for which the source of breathing air is not carried by the user. Tight-fitting face piece is a respirator covering that forms a complete seal with the face, e.g., half mask or full-face piece. User seal check is an action by the respirator user to determine if the respirator is properly seated to the face. See appendix B-1.

(3) Respiratory protection program.

(a) When respirators are necessary to protect the health of workers or when you require workers to wear them, you must have an effective, written respiratory protection program, managed by a knowledgeable person, with procedures specific to your work site. Keep the program updated to reflect changes in conditions that require the use of respirators. You must include at least these points, as applicable:

(A) Procedures for selecting respirators for use in the workplace;

(B) Procedures for the medical evaluations of employees required to use respirators;

(C) Fit testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators;

(D) Procedures for proper use of respirators in routine and reasonably foreseeable emergency situations;

(E) Procedures and schedules for cleaning, disinfecting, storing, inspecting, repairing, discarding, and otherwise maintaining respirators;

(F) Procedures to ensure adequate air quality, quantity, and flow of breathing air for atmosphere-supplying respirators;

(G) Procedures for training employees in the respiratory hazards to which they are potentially exposed during routine and emergency situations;

(H) Procedures for training employees in the proper use of respirators, including putting on and removing them, any limitations on their use, and their maintenance; and

(I) Procedures for regularly evaluating the effectiveness of the program.

(b) The employer must provide respirators, and all other program requirements including training, and medical evaluations at no cost to the employee.

(c) Where respirator use is voluntary:

(A) You may provide respirators to employees who request them or they may use their own respirators. If you allow this voluntary use;

(i) You must determine that it will not create a hazard to the user;

(ii) You must provide the voluntary user with the information in Appendix D, “Information for Employees Using Respirators When Not Required Under the Standard”, and;

(B) You must have a limited written respiratory program for voluntary users. It must include those parts of the standard program necessary to ensure that:

(i) The user is medically able to use the respirator without adverse health effects. Users of tight-fitting respirators other than dust masks must have a medical evaluation.

(ii) The user will properly clean, store and maintain the respirator.

(4) Selection of respirators. Identify and evaluate the respiratory hazard(s) including a reasonable estimate of employee exposures and an identification of the contaminant’s chemical state and physical form. You must treat atmospheres with the potential for IDLH conditions as an IDLH hazard and provide appropriate respiratory protection.

(a) General requirements.

(A) You must evaluate respiratory hazards, conditions in the workplace and user factors, then select and provide the appropriate respirators.

(B) All respirators must have NIOSH certification and all use must conform to that certification.

(C) Respirators must correctly fit and be acceptable to the user.

(b) Respirators for IDLH atmospheres.

(A) Provide the following respirators for employee use in IDLH atmospheres:

(i) A full-face piece pressure demand SCBA certified by NIOSH for a minimum service life of 30 minutes, or

(ii) A combination full-face piece pressure demand supplied-air respirator (SAR) with auxiliary self-contained air supply.

(B) Respirators only for escape from IDLH atmospheres must have NIOSH certification for escape from the atmosphere of use.

(C) Treat all oxygen-deficient atmospheres as IDLH.

EXCEPTION to paragraph (4)(b)(C): If you can demonstrate that under all foreseeable conditions, the oxygen concentration will stay within the ranges in Table A for the appropriate altitudes set out in the table, then your selection of atmosphere-supplying respirators is not limited to the types listed in (4)(b)(A). Table A

(c) Respirators for atmospheres that are not IDLH.

(A) Provide respirators adequate to protect the health of workers and ensure compliance with all other OR-OSHA requirements, under routine and reasonably foreseeable emergency situations.

(i) Assigned Protection Factors (APFs). Employers must use the assigned protection factors listed in Table B to select a respirator that meets or exceeds the required level of employee protection. When using a combination respirator (e.g., airline respirators with an air-purifying filter), employers must ensure that the assigned protection factor is appropriate to the mode of operation in which the respirator is being used. Table B

(ii) Maximum Use Concentration (MUC).

(I) The employer must select a respirator for employee use that maintains the employee’s exposure to the hazardous substance, when measured outside the respirator, at or below the MUC.

(II) Employers must not apply MUCs to conditions that are immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH); instead, they must use respirators listed for IDLH conditions in paragraph (4)(b) of this standard.

(III) When the calculated MUC exceeds the IDLH level for a hazardous substance, or the performance limits of the cartridge or canister, then employers must set the maximum MUC at that lower limit.

(B) The respirator must be appropriate for the chemical state and physical form of the contaminant.

(C) For protection against gases and vapors, provide:

(i) An atmosphere-supplying respirator, or

(ii) An air-purifying respirator, if:

(I) It has and end-of-service-life indicator (ESLI) certified by NIOSH for the contaminant; or

(II) If there is no ESLI appropriate for your conditions, implement a change schedule for canisters and cartridges that is based on objective information or data that will ensure that canisters and cartridges are changed before the end of their service life. Describe in the respirator program the information and data relied on and the basis for the canister and cartridge change schedule and the basis for reliance on the data.

NOTE: The Worker Protection Standard contains criteria for specific change out schedules for respirator canisters and cartridges. See Division 4/W, 170.240.

(D) For protection against particulates, provide:

(i) An atmosphere-supplying respirator; or

(ii) An air-purifying respirator with a filter certified by NIOSH under 30 CFR part 11 as a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, or an air-purifying respirator with a filter certified for particulates by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84; or

(iii) For contaminants consisting primarily of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) of at least 2 micrometers, an air-purifying respirator with any filter certified for particulates by NIOSH.

(5) Medical evaluation. Using a respirator may place a physiological burden on employees that depends on the type of respirator, the job and workplace conditions in which the respirator is used, and the medical status of the employee.

(a) General. You must provide medical evaluations to determine each worker’s ability to use a respirator without causing adverse health effects. Do this before the worker’s fit test and before they perform any work requiring respirator use. The employer may discontinue an employee’s medical evaluations when the employee no longer uses a respirator.

(b) Medical evaluation procedures. The employer must identify a physician or other licensed health care professional (PLHCP) to perform medical evaluations using a medical questionnaire or an initial examination that obtains the same information as the medical questionnaire. The medical evaluation must obtain the information requested by the questionnaire in Appendix C, Part A, Sections 1 and 2, of this standard.

NOTE: If the employee refuses the examination, they may not be permitted to work in jobs that require a tight-fitting respirator.

(c) Follow-up medical examination.

(A) The employer must ensure that a follow-up medical examination is provided for an employee if, in the opinion of the PLHCP, this is necessary.

NOTE: The PLHCP may require a follow-up examination for an employee who gives a positive response to any question among questions 1 through 9, or 10 through 15 in Appendix C, Part A, Section 2; or whose initial medical examination demonstrates the need for a follow-up medical examination.

(B) The follow-up medical examination must include any medical tests, consultations, or diagnotic procedures that the PLHCP deems necessary to make a final determination.

(d) Administration of the medical questionnaire and examinations.

(A) You must allow the employee to complete the questionnaire in a way that protects the confidentiality of the information. Employers are not allowed to see the answers or to review the completed form. You must allow employees to complete the form during normal working hours or at a time and place convenient to them. If employees need help, allow them to ask your PLHCP or anybody other than their employer or representtatives of their employer.

(B) The employer must provide the employee with an opportunity to discuss the questionnaire and examination results with the PLHCP.

(e) Supplemental information for the PLHCP.

(A) You must give the PLHCP the required supplemental information before they make any recommendation about a worker’s ability to use a respirator. Use Appendix C, Part B, Section 2 of this standard, or an equivalent form to provide this information.

(i) The type and weight of the respirator the employee will use;

(ii) How long and how often the employee will use the respirator (including use for rescue and escape);

(iii) The expected physical work effort while using the respirator;

(iv) Additional protective clothing and equipment to be worn; and

(v) Temperature and humidity extremes that may exist during use.

(B) Supplemental information you provide for an employee’s medical evaluation does not have to be provided again for later evaluations unless the information or the PLHCP changes.

(C) You must provide a copy of your written respiratory program and this standard to the PLHCP.

Note to Paragraph (5)(e): When the employer replaces a PLHCP, the employer must ensure that the new PLHCP has this information, either by providing the documents directly to the new PLHCP or by having the documents transferred from the former PLHCP to the new PLHCP. However, OR-OSHA does not expect employers to have employees medically reevaluated solely because there is a new PLHCP.

(f) Medical determination. In determining the employee’s ability to use a respirator, the employer must:

(A) Obtain a written recommendation about the employee’s ability to use the respirator from the PLHCP. The recommendation must provide only the following information:

(i) Any limitations on respirator use relating to the medical condition of the employee, or relating to the workplace conditions, including whether or not the employee is medically able to use the respirator;

(ii) The need, if any, for follow-up medical evaluations; and

(iii) A statement that the PLHCP gave a copy of the recommendation to the worker.

(B) If the respirator is a negative pressure respirator and the PLHCP finds that using it would increase the employee’s health risk, the employer must provide a PAPR until a subsequent evaluation clears the employee for another type.

(g) Additional medical evaluations. At a minimum, the employer must provide additional medical evaluations that comply with this standard if:

(A) An employee reports medical signs or symptoms related to ability to use a respirator;

(B) A PLHCP, supervisor, or the knowledgeable person who manages the respiratory protection program informs the employer that an employee needs a reevaluation; or

(C) Information from the respiratory protection program, including observations made during fit testing and program evaluation, indicates a need for employee reevaluation; or

(D) A change occurs in work conditions (such as physical work effort, protective clothing, and temperatures) that may result in a substantial increase in the physiological burden to the employee.

(6) Fit testing. You must:

(a) Ensure that employees using a tight-fitting face piece respirator pass an appropriate qualitative fit test (QLFT) or quantitative fit test (QNFT), using the same make, model, style and size respirator that they will use in the workplace.

(b) Ensure that each worker using a tight-fitting face piece respirator is fit-tested, before initial respirator use; whenever they change to another type, style, model, or make of respirator, and at least annually thereafter.

(c) Do a new fit test on a worker when you observe or the worker, a supervisor, the program administrator, or a PLCHP report any change in the worker’s physical condition that could affect the respirator fit. Such conditions include, but are not limited to, facial scarring, dental changes, cosmetic surgery, or an obvious change in body weight.

(d) Give employees a reasonable opportunity to select a different respirator face piece and redo the fit test if, after passing a QLFT or QNFT, the employee notifies the employer, supervisor, or PLHCP that the fit of the respirator is unacceptable.

(e) Ensure that all fit tests comply with the accepted QLFT or QNFT protocols in Appendix A of this standard.

(f) Ensure that qualitative fit tests (QLFT) are used only to fit test negative pressure air-purifying respirators that must achieve an assigned protective factor of 50 or less.

(g) Ensure that quantitative fit tests (QNFT), using an accepted QNFT protocol, are only passed by achieving a fit factor of 100 or more for a tight fitting half face piece respirator, and a fit factor of 500 or more for a tight fitting full face piece respirator.

(h) Ensure that fit testing of tight-fitting atmosphere-supplying respirators and tight-fitting powered air-purifying respirators is only accomplished by performing quantitative or qualitative fit testing in the negative pressure mode, regardless of the mode of operation (negative or positive pressure) that is used for respiratory protection.

(A) Do qualitative fit testing of these respirators by temporarily converting the respirator user’s actual face piece into a negative pressure respirator with appropriate filters, or by using an identical negative pressure air-purifying respirator face piece with the same sealing surfaces as a surrogate for the atmosphere-supplying or powered air-purifying respirator face piece.

(B) Do quantitative fit testing of these respirators by modifying the face piece to allow sampling inside the face piece in the breathing zone of the user, midway between the nose and mouth. Do this by installing a permanent sampling probe onto a surrogate face piece, or by using a sampling adapter designed to temporarily provide a way to sample air from inside the face piece.

(C) Before returning a face piece to normal use, completely remove any modifications done for fit testing, and restore the face piece to NIOSH-approved configuration.

(7) Use of respirators.

(a) Face piece seal protection.

(A) You must not permit workers to wear tight-fitting face pieces if they have:

(i) Facial hair that comes between the face-to-face piece sealing surface or that interferes with the respirator’s valve function; or

(ii) Any other condition that interferes with the face-to-face piece seal or valve function.

(B) If an employee wears glasses or goggles or other personal protective equipment, the employer must ensure that it does not interfere with the seal of the face piece to the face of the user.

(C) Employers must ensure that workers who wear respirators perform a user seal check before every use, using the procedures in Appendix B-1 or, if equally effective, the recommendations of the respirator manufacturer.

(b) Continuing respirator effectiveness.

(A) You must reevaluate the effectiveness of a respirator when there is a change in work area conditions or degree of employee exposure or stress that may affect respirator effectiveness.

(B) You must ensure that employees leave the area where respirators are required:

(i) To wash their faces and respirator face pieces as necessary to prevent eye or skin irritation associated with respirator use; or

(ii) If they detect vapor or gas breakthrough, changes in breathing resistance, or leakage of the face piece; or

(iii) To replace the respirator or the filter, cartridge, or canister elements.

(C) If the employee detects vapor or gas breakthrough, changes in breathing resistance, or leakage of the face piece, the employer or a competent person must replace or repair the respirator before allowing the employee to return to the work area.

(c) Procedures for IDLH atmospheres. For all IDLH atmospheres, the employer must ensure that:

(A) One employee or, when needed, more than one employee is stationed outside the IDLH atmosphere;

(B) Visual, voice, or line communication is continuous between the employee(s) in the IDLH atmosphere and the employee(s) outside the IDLH atmosphere;

(C) The employee(s) outside the IDLH atmosphere have the training and equipment to provide effective emergency rescue;

(D) The employer or designee is notified before the employee(s) outside the IDLH atmosphere enter the IDLH atmosphere to provide emergency rescue;

(E) The employer or designee authorized to do so by the employer, once notified, provides necessary assistance appropriate to the situation;

(F) Employee(s) outside the IDLH atmospheres have:

(i) Pressure demand or other positive pressure SCBAs, or a pressure demand or other positive pressure supplied-air respirator with auxiliary SCBA; and either:

(ii) Appropriate retrieval equipment for removing the employee(s) who enter(s) these hazardous atmospheres where retrieval equipment would contribute to the rescue of the employee(s) and would not increase the overall risk resulting from entry; or

(iii) Equivalent means for rescue when there is no requirement for retrieval equipment under paragraph (7)(c)(F)(ii).

(d) Procedures for interior structural firefighting. If you require your workers to fight interior structural fires, paragraph (7)(c) applies. You must also do the following:

(A) At least two employees enter the IDLH atmosphere and remain in visual or voice contact with one another at all times; and

(B) At least two employees are located outside the IDLH atmosphere; and

(C) All employees engaged in interior structural firefighting use SCBA’s.

Note 1 to paragraph (7)(d):One of the two individuals located outside the IDLH atmosphere may be assigned to an additional role, such as incident commander in charge of the emergency or safety officer, so long as this individual is able to perform assistance or rescue activities without jeopardizing the safety of health of any firefighter working at the incident.

Note 2 to paragraph (7)(d): Nothing in this section is meant to preclude firefighters from performing emergency rescue activities before an entire team has assembled.

(8) Maintenance and care of respirators.

(a) Cleaning and disinfecting. You must provide each respirator user with a respirator that is clean, sanitary, and in good working order. You also must ensure that respirators are cleaned and disinfected using the procedures in Appendix B-2, or equally effective procedures recommended by the respirator manufacturer, at the following intervals:

(A) Clean and disinfect respirators used exclusively by one worker as often as necessary to keep them sanitary;

(B) Clean and disinfect respirators after each use, or before being worn by different individuals, if used by more than one worker;

(C) Clean and disinfect emergency use respirators after each use; and

(D) Clean and disinfect fit test and training respirators after each use.

(b) Storage. Ensure that respirators are stored as follows:

(A) Store all respirators to protect them from damage, contamination, dust, sunlight, extreme temperatures, excessive moisture, damaging chemicals, and to prevent deformation of the face piece and exhalation valve.

(B) In addition to the requirements of paragraph (8)(b)(A), keep emergency respirators:

(i) Accessible to the work area;

(ii) In compartments or in covers clearly marked as containing emergency respirators; and

(iii) In accordance with any applicable manufacturer instructions.

(c) Inspections.

(A) The employer must require respirator inspections as follows:

(i) Inspect all routine use respirators before each use and during cleaning;

(ii) Inspect emergency use respirators at least monthly and according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Check for proper function before and after each use; and

(iii) Inspect escape respirators before taking them into the workplace for use.

(B) The employer must ensure that respirator inspections include the following:

(i) A check of respirator function, tightness of connections, and the condition of the various parts including, but not limited to, the face piece, head straps, valves, connecting tube, and cartridges, canisters or filters; and

(ii) A check of elastomeric parts for pliability and signs of deterioration.

(C) In addition to the requirements of paragraphs (8)(c)(A) and (B), inspect self-contained breathing apparatus monthly. Keep air and oxygen fully charged and recharge them when the pressure falls to 90 percent of the manufacturer’s recommended pressure level. Be certain the regulator and warning devices work properly.

(D) For emergency use respirators, the employer must:

(i) Certify the respirator by documenting the date of inspection, the name (or signature) of the inspector, the findings, required remedial action, and a serial number or other means of identifying the respirator; and

(ii) Provide this information on a tag or label attached to the respirator storage compartment, or keep it with the respirator, or include it in paper or electronic inspection reports. Keep this information until the next report replaces it.

(d) Repairs. Do not use respirators that fail an inspection or are otherwise defective. Either discard them or repair them according to these procedures:

(A) Only people with appropriate training may repair or adjust respirators. They must use only the manufacturer’s NIOSH-approved parts designed for the particular respirator;

(B) Repairs must conform to the manufacturer’s recommendations for the type of repair to be performed;

(C) Only the manufacturer or a technician trained by the manufacturer may repair or adjust the reducing and admission valves, regulators and alarms.

(9) Breathing air quality and use.

(a) The employer must ensure or have their supplier certify that compressed air, compressed oxygen, liquid air, and liquid oxygen used for respiration meets the following specifications:

(A) Compressed and liquid oxygen must meet the United States Pharmacopoeia requirements for medical or breathing oxygen; and

(B) Compressed breathing air must meet at least the requirements for Grade D breathing air described in ANSI/Compressed Gas Association Commodity Specification for Air, G-7.1-1989, to include:

(i) Oxygen content (v/v) between 19.5 and 23.5 percent;

(ii) Hydrocarbon (condensed) content of no more than 5 milligrams per cubic meter of air;

(iii) Carbon monoxide (CO) content of no more than 10 ppm;

(iv) Carbon dioxide content of no more than 1,000 ppm; and

(v) No noticeable odor.

NOTE: Do not fill your own air vessels unless they and the contents meet all the requirements of this standard.

(b) Do not use compressed oxygen in atmosphere-supplied respirators that previously held compressed air.

(c) The employer must ensure that oxygen concentrations more than 23.5 percent are used only in equipment designed for oxygen service or distribution.

(d) The employer must ensure that cylinders to supply breathing air to respirators meet the following requirements:

(A) Cylinders are tested and maintained as prescribed in the Shipping Container Specification Regulations of the Department of Transportation (49 CFR part 180);

(B) Cylinders of purchased breathing air have a certificate of analysis from the supplier that the breathing air meets the requirements for Grade D breathing air; and

(C) The moisture content in the cylinder does not exceed a dew point of –50 degrees F. (-45.6 degrees C.) at 1 atmosphere pressure.

(e) The employer must ensure that compressors supplying breathing air to respirators are constructed and situated to:

(A) Prevent entry of contaminated air into the air-supply system;

(B) Minimize moisture content so that the dew point at 1 atmosphere pressure is 10 degrees F. (5.56 degrees C.) below the ambient temperature;

(C) Have suitable in-line air-purifying sorbent beds and filters to further ensure breathing air quality. Maintain and replace sorbent beds and filters according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

(D) Have a tag at the compressor showing the most recent change date and the signature of the authorized person who did the change.

(f) For compressors that are not oil-lubricated, ensure that carbon monoxide levels in the breathing air do not exceed 10 ppm.

(g) For oil-lubricated compressors, use only a high-temperature or carbon monoxide alarm, or both, to monitor carbon monoxide levels. If you use only high-temperature alarms, monitor the air supply often enough to prevent carbon monoxide in the breathing air from exceeding 10 ppm.

(h) The employer must ensure that breathing air couplings are incompatible with outlets for nonrespirable worksite air or other gas systems. Do not allow any asphyxiating substance to get into breathing airlines.

(i) Use only the respirator manufacturer’s NIOSH approved breathing gas containers marked and maintained in accordance with the Quality Assurance provisions of the NIOSH approval for the SCBA, as issued in accordance with the NIOSH respirator certification standard at 42 CFR part 84.

(10) Identification of filters, cartridges, and canisters. The employer must ensure that all filters, cartridges and canisters have labels and color codes that comply with the NIOSH standards and that the label remains in place and legible.

(11) Training and information.

(a) The employer must ensure that each employee can demonstrate knowledge of at least the following:

(A) Why the respirator is necessary and how improper fit, use, or maintenance can compromise the protective effect of the respirator;

(B) What the limitations and capabilities of the respirator are;

(C) How to use the respirator effectively in emergency situations, including situations in which the respirator malfunctions;

(D) How to inspect, put on and remove, use, and check the seals of the respirator;

(E) What the procedures are for maintenance and storage of the respirator;

(F) How to recognize medical signs and symptoms that may limit or prevent the effective use of respirators; and

(G) The general requirements of this rule.

(b) Training must be in a language or form that workers understand.

(c) Training must be complete before workers use respirators.

(d) Retrain respirator users annually and when these situations happen:

(A) Changes in the work or the type of respirator make previous training obsolete;

(B) Inadequacies in the employee’s knowledge or use of the respirator indicate that they no longer have the basic understanding or skill; or

(C) Any other situation arises in which retraining appears necessary to ensure safe respirator use.

(e) An employer who can demonstrate that a new employee has training within the last 12 months that addresses the elements in paragraph (11)(a)(A) through (G) does not have to repeat that training if, the employee can demonstrate knowledge of those element(s). Previous training not repeated initially by the employer must be provided no later than 12 months from the date of the previous training.

(f) Provide every voluntary respirator user with the basic advisory information in Appendix D. Any written or oral format that the employee understands is acceptable.

(12) Program evaluation.

(a) Evaluate the workplace as necessary to ensure effective implementation of the current written program.

(b) Regularly consult your respirator users to get their views on your program’s effectiveness and to identify problems. Correct the problems identified. Things to assess include at least:

(A) Respirator fit (including the ability to use the respirator without interfering with effective workplace performance);

(B) Users have and use the correct respirator and components for their exposure hazards;

(C) Proper respirator use; and

(D) Proper respirator maintenance.

(13) Recordkeeping.

(a) Medical evaluation. Retain and make available all medical evaluations required by this standard according to Division 2/Z, 1910.1020. (Division 4/A, 437-004-0005, Medical Records Access, stipulates that Division 2/Z, 1910.1020 applies to agricultural employers.)

(b) Fit testing.

(A) You must keep a record of qualitative and quantitative fit tests for each user including:

(i) The name or identification of the employee;

(ii) Type of fit test;

(iii) Specific make, model, style, and size of respirator tested;

(iv) Date of test; and

(v) The pass/fail results for QLFTs or the fit factor and strip chart recording or other recording of the test results for QNFTs.

(B) Keep fit test records until records of a new test replace them.

(c) You must keep a written copy of your current respirator program.

(d) On request, you must make written records required by this standard, available to the Oregon OSHA Administrator or their designee for examination or copying.

(14) Appendices. Compliance with Appendix A, Appendix B-1, Appendix B-2, Appendix C, and Appendix D of this rule is mandatory.

(15) Effective Date. OAR 437-004-1041, Respiratory Protection, is effective March 1, 2007. Appendices.

[ED. NOTE: Tables & Appendices referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2), 656.726(4).
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295.
Hist.: OSHA 3-2006, f. 6-7-06, cert. ef. 3-1-07; OSHA 10-2006, f. & cert. ef. 11-30-06; OSHA 3-2007, f. & cert. ef. 8-13-07; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-1050

Head Protection

NOTE: See Division 4/W, 437-004-600, 170.240(c)(10) for information about the chemical-resistant headwear requirements for pesticide handlers.

(1) General requirements. Require employees to wear head protection helmets or hardhats when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head such as from falling or flying objects or electrical hazards.

(2) Criteria for protective headwear.

(a) Head protection must comply with any of the following consensus standards:

(A) ANSI Z89.1-2003, “American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection;”

(B) ANSI Z89.1-1997, “American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection;” or

(C) ANSI Z89.1-1986, “American National Standard for Personnel Protection — Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers – Requirements.”

NOTE: The Oregon OSHA Resource Center has copies of these standards for public review at 350 Winter Street NE, Salem OR.

(b) Protective headwear that the employer demonstrates is at least as effecive as protective headwear that is constructed in accordance with one of the above consensus standards will be deemed to be in compliance with the requirements of this section.

(3) Require employees who work close to moving parts of power-driven machinery or sources of ignition and whose hair is long enough to be caught in it or to be ignited, to wear caps or other head coverings that completely restrains the hair.

NOTE: See Divisions 4/O and 4/P for equipment and tool guarding requirements.

[Publications: Publications referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 2-2010, f. & cert. ef. 2-25-10; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-1060

Hand and Foot Protection

NOTES: See Division 4/P, 437-004-2220(10) for the protective equipment requirements (appropriate gloves, aprons and leg guards) for employees using sharp-edged cutting tools. See Division 4/P, 437-004-2230 for requirements for PPE while using chain saws. See Division 4/W, 437-004-6000, 170.240(c)(5) and (6) for information about the requirements for gloves and chemical-resistant footwear for pesticide handlers.

(1) General requirements for hand protection.

(a) Employers must select and require employees to use appropriate hand protection when the work exposes employees’ hands to hazards such as contact with harmful substances; severe cuts, lacerations, or abrasions; punctures; chemical burns; electrical hazards; harmful temperature extremes.

(b) Do not allow the use of leather or other absorbent materials to protect against chemical hazards.

(c) Do not allow employees to wear gloves near moving parts or machines that might catch them.

NOTE: See Divisions 4/O and 4/P for equipment and tool guarding requirements.

(2) General requirements for protective footwear.

(a) Require employees to use appropriate protective footwear when there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, objects piercing the sole, chemical exposures, or electrical hazards.

(b) Protective footwear must comply with any of the following consensus standards:

(A) ASTM F-2412-2005, “Standard Test Methods for Foot Protection,” and ASTM F-2413-2005, “Standard Specification for Performance Requirements for Protective Footwear;”

(B) ANSI Z41-1999, “American National Standard for Personal Protection — Protective Footwear;” or

(C) ANSI Z41-1991, “American National Standard for Personal Protection – Protective Footwear.”

NOTES: Look for ANSI compliance information on the shoe, the box, or tags. The Oregon OSHA Resource Center has copies of these consensus standards for public review at 350 Winter Street NE, Salem OR.

(c) Protective footwear that the employer demonstrates is at least as effective as footwear that is constructed in accordance with one of the above consensus standards will be deemed to be in compliance with the requirements of this section.

(3) Protection of Extremities.

(a) Require employees to wear leggings or high boots of leather, rubber or other suitable material to protect legs from physical hazards such as hot or cold substances, or sharp objects, and from chemical hazards such as spills or splashes.

(b) Require employees to wear sleeves or long gloves of leather, rubber or other suitable material to protect arms from physical hazards such as hot or cold substances, or sharp objects; and from chemical hazards such as spills or splashes.

(c) Do not allow the use of of leather or other absorbent materials to protect against chemical hazards.

NOTE: See Division 4/P, OAR 437-004-2230(1)(c)(G) for the requirement to provide flexible bassistic nylon pads, chaps (or other equivalent protective equipment for the legs from the thigh to the top of the boot) for employees using chain saws.

[Publications: Publications referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 2-2010, f. & cert. ef. 2-25-10; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-1070

Working Underway on Water.

(1) Definitions.

(a) Boat — means every description of water craft used or capable of being used as a means of transportation on the water, but does not include aircraft built to land on the water.

Examples include rowboats, powerboats, rafts, barges, pontoons, and dredges.

(b) Underway — means when a boat is in or on the water and on the move – not at anchor, not moored, and not made fast to the shore.

(2) Personal flotation devices.

(a) Workers in boats that are underway must wear Coast Guard approved or equivalent, wearable personal flotation devices (PFD).

Exception: A worker below deck or in an enclosed part of a boat like a cabin or pilot house, need not wear the PFD but must have it readily available.

(b) The PFD provided must be:

(A) The right size for the wearer,

(B) Able to perform the function that the manufacturer intended, and

(C) Maintained according to the manufacturer’s requirements and recommendations.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 1-2001, f. 1-18-01, cert. ef. 3-1-01; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-1075

Working Over or In Water

(1) Definition. Rescue device means a ring buoy and line, gaff pole, throwable rescue device, or other device that serves as a means to rescue somebody from the water without requiring the rescuer to enter the water.

(2) Scope and Application.

(a) These rules apply where there is a danger of drowning and the water is more than 5 feet deep. These rules do not apply to workers protected by general or personal fall protection.

(b) If employees are engaged in diving and related support operations conducted in connection with Agricultural employment, Division 2, 1910.401 through 1910.440, Commercial Diving Operations, applies.

(3) Personal flotation and rescue devices.

(a) Workers in water, over water on floating or unstable surfaces, or adjacent to water, must wear a Coast Guard approved or equivalent, wearable personal flotation device (PFD).

(b) The PFD must be:

(A) The right size for the wearer,

(B) Able to perform the function that the manufacturer intended, and

(C) Maintained according to the manufacturer’s requirements and recommendations.

(c) Piers, docks, wharves and work sites along developed shorelines must have rescue devices available within 200 feet of the water or shoreline work area.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 1-2001, f. 1-18-01, cert. ef. 3-1-01; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9000

Oregon Rules for Air Contaminants

An employee’s exposure to any substance in Oregon Tables Z-1, Z-2, or Z-3 of this section must be limited in accordance with the requirements of the following paragraphs of this section.

(1) Oregon Table Z-1.

(a) Substances with limits preceded by “C” – ceiling values. An employee’s exposure to any substance in Oregon Table Z-1, the exposure limit of which is not preceded by a “C”, must at no time exceed the ceiling exposure limit given for that substance. If instantaneous monitoring is not feasible, then assess the ceiling as a 15-minute time-weighted average. This exposure level must never be exceeded at any time during the workday.

(b) Other substances — 8-hour time-weighted averages (PEL-TWA). An employee’s exposure to any substance in Oregon Table Z-1, the exposure limit of which is not preceded by a “C”, must not exceed the 8-hour Time-Weighted Average for that substance in any 8-hour shift of a 40-hour work week.

(c) Other substances — Excursion Limits. Excursions in exposure levels may be more than three times the PEL-TWA number for no more than a total of 30 minutes during a workday, and must never be more than five times the PEL-TWA, provided that the overall 8-hour PEL-TWA is not exceeded.

(d) Skin designation. To prevent or reduce skin absorption, you must prevent or reduce an employee’s skin exposure to substances listed in Oregon Table Z-1 with an “X” in the Skin designation column following the substance name. Prevent or reduce exposure to the extent necessary in the cirumstances through the use of gloves, coveralls, goggles, or other appropriate personal protective equipment, engineering controls or work practices.

(e) Oregon Table Z-1 in Division 4/Z, OAR 437-004-9000, has a complete list of regulated substances. If your operation exposes an employee to a substances listed in Oregon Table Z-1, and that substance includes a reference to another rule, that rule may apply to your circumstances.

(2) Oregon Table Z-2. An employee’s exposure to any substance listed in Oregon Table Z-2 must not exceed the following exposure limits:

(a) 8-hour time-weighted averages. An employee’s exposure to any substance in Oregon Table Z-2, in any 8 hour work shift of a 40-hour work week, must not exceed the 8-hour time-weighted average limit for that substance in Oregon Table Z-2.

(b) Acceptable ceiling concentrations. An employee’s exposure to a substance in Oregon Table Z-2 must not exceed the acceptable ceiling concentration for that substance during an 8-hour shift except:

(i) Acceptable maximum peak above the acceptable ceiling concentration for an 8-hour shift. An employee’s exposure to a substance in Oregon Table Z-2 must never exceed the acceptable maximum peak above the acceptable ceiling concentration and must not exceed the maximum duration of exposure at that level for the substance during an 8-hour shift.

(c) Example. During an 8-hour work shift, an employee’s exposure to benzene is limited to an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 10 ppm. The acceptable ceiling concentration of benzene during the 8-hour work shift is a maximum of 25 ppm, unless that exposure is no more than 50 ppm and for not longer than 10 minutes during an 8-hour work shift. Such exposures must be compensated by lower exposure levels (concentrations below the TWA number – 10 ppm) during that shift so that the overall 8 hour time-weighted average is a maximum of 10 ppm. Example Table.

(d) Skin designation. To prevent or reduce skin absorption, you must prevent or reduce an employee’s skin exposure to substances listed in Oregon Table Z-2 with an “X” in the Skin designation column following the substance name. Prevent or reduce exposure to the extent necessary in the circumstances through the use of gloves, coveralls, goggles, or other appropriate personal protective equipment, engineering controls, or work practices.

(3) Oregon Table Z-3. An employee’s exposure to any substance in Oregon Table Z-3, in any 8-hour work shift of a 40-hour work week, must not exceed the 8-hour time-weighted average limit given for that substance.

(4) Computation formulae. The computation formulae that apply to exposures to one or more substances, with 8-hour time-weighted averages included in OAR 437, Division 4/Z, Chemicals/Toxins, in order to determine whether an employee is exposed is over the regulatory limit are as follow:

(a) For a single air contaminant:

(i) Compute the cumulative exposure for an 8-hour work shift as follows:

E = (CaTa + CbTb + ...CnTn) ÷ 8

Where:

E is the equivalent exposure to that substance for the shift.

C is the concentration during any period T where the concentration remains constant.

T is the duration in hours of the exposure at the concentration C.

The value of E must not exceed the 8-hour time-weighted average specified for that substance in Subdivision 4/Z.

(ii) To illustrate the formula in (4)(a)(i) above, assume that Substance A (from Oregon Table Z-1) has an 8 hour time-weighted average limit of 100 ppm. Assume that an employee is subject to the following exposure:

Two hours exposure at 150 ppm

Two hours exposure at 75 ppm

Four hours exposure at 50 ppm

Substituting this information in the formula, we have:

[(Ca x Ta) + (Cb x Tb) + ... (Cn x Tn)] ÷ 8 = E =TWA

[(2 x 150) + (2 x 75) + (4 x 50)] ÷ 8 = 81.25 ppm

Since 81.25 ppm is less than 100 ppm, the 8-hour time-weighted average limit, the exposure is acceptable.

(b) For a mixture of air contaminants:

(i) In case of a mixture of air contaminants, compute the equivalent exposure as follows:

Em = (C1 ÷ L1) + (C2 ÷ L2) + . . .(Cn ÷ Ln)

Where:

Em is the equivalent exposure for the mixture.

Cn is the concentration of a particular contaminant.

Ln is the exposure limit for that substance in Subdivision 4/Z.

The value of Em must not exceed “unity” (1).

(ii) To illustrate the formula in (4)(b)(i) above, consider the following exposures:

Table.

Substituting in the formula, we have:

Em = (C1 ÷ L1) + (C2 ÷ L2) + . . .(Cn ÷ Ln)

Em = (500 ÷ 1000) + (45 ÷ 200) + (40 ÷ 200)

Em = 0.500 + 0.225 + 0.200

Em = 0.925

Since Em (0.925) is less than unity (1), the exposure combination is within acceptable limits.

(5) Engineering or administrative controls. To achieve compliance with the exposure limits in paragraphs (1) through (4) of this section, first determine and implement, when feasible, engineering or administrative controls. When such controls are not feasible, mandate the use of protective equipment or any other protective measures to keep exposure within the limits in this section. Any equipment or technical measures used for this purpose must be approved for each particular use by a competent Industrial Hygienist or other technically qualified person. Whenever using respirators, comply with Division 4/I, OAR 437-004-1040, Respiratory Protection. Tables Z-1, Z-2, Z-3, and notes.

[ED. NOTE: Tables and Notes referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2001, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-01; OSHA 9-2001, f. & cert. ef. 9-14-01; OSHA 6-2006, f. & cert. ef. 8-30-06; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9050

Asbestos

Definitions: Asbestos includes chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite asbestos, anthophyllite asbestos, actinolite asbestos and any of these minerals that have been chemically treated or altered. Asbestos-containing material (ACM) means any material containing more than 1% asbestos. Presumed asbestos containing material (PACM) means thermal system insulation and surfacing material found in buildings constructed no later than 1980. The designation of a material as “PACM” may be rebutted pursuant to Division 2/Z, 1910.1001(j)(8).

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in a potential exposure to asbestos.

(2) Work that exposes employees to asbestos must comply with Division 2/Z, 1910.1001, Asbestos; except that construction activities exposing employees to asbestos must comply with Division 3/Z, 1926.1101, Asbestos.

NOTE: Construction activities are building, altering and repairing, and include painting.

(3) The employer must periodically examine all asbestos-containing material in the workplace to ensure that there is no deterioration or damage that could cause employee exposure.

(4) If you find damage or deterioration, the material must be repaired, encapsulated, or removed consistent with the requirements in Division 3/Z, 1926.1101, Asbestos.

NOTES: Tasks or work activities that could expose employees to asbestos include the following:

Housekeeping or maintenance activities on workplace surfaces or systems with asbestos-containing materials (examples include flooring, ceiling tiles, roofing, siding, boilers, heaters, insulation, and fireproofing);

Inspection, disassembly, repair and assembly of automotive or farm vehicle brakes and clutches; Demolition or salvage of structures where asbestos-containing materials are present; New construction, alteration, or renovation of structures, substrates, or portions thereof with asbestos-containing materials; and, Routine or emergency cleanup of asbestos-containing materials. Employers who have pipe systems that are insulated with asbestos-containing materials in their workplaces, must also comply with Division 4/Z, OAR 437-004-9850, Pipe Labelling.

[ED. NOTE: Examples referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9090

13 Carcinogens

Definitions: The 13 carcinogens are:

4-Nitrobiphenyl, CAS 92-93-3;

alpha-Naphthylamine, CAS 134-32-7;

Methyl chloromethyl ether, CAS 107-30-2;

3,3-Dichlorobenzidine (and its salts), CAS 91-94-1;

bis-Chloromethyl ether, CAS 542-88-1;

beta-Naphthylamine, CAS 91-59-8;

Benzidine, CAS 92-87-5;

4-Aminodiphenyl, CAS 92-67-1;

Ethyleneimine, CAS 151-56-4;

beta-Propiolactone, CAS 57-57-8;

2-Acetylaminoflourene, CAS 53-96-3;

4-Dimethylaminoazo-benzene, CAS 60-11-7; and

N-Nitrosodimethylamine, CAS 62-75-9.

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in a potential exposure to any of the 13 carcinogens.

(2) Work that exposes employees to any of the 13 carcinogens must comply with Division 2/Z, 1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9600

Lead

Definition: Lead means elemental, metallic lead (chemical formula Pb), all inorganic lead compounds, and organic lead soaps. All other organic lead compounds are excluded.

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in a potential exposure to lead.

(2) Work that exposes employees to lead must comply with Division 2/Z, 1910.1025, Lead; except that construction activities exposing employees to lead must comply with Division 3/D, 1926.62, Lead.

NOTES: Construction activities are building, altering and repairing and include painting.

Tasks or work activities that could expose employees to lead include:

Demolition or salvage of structures where lead-containing materials are present;

New construction, alteration, or renovation of structures, substrates, or portions thereof with lead-containing materials;

Routine or emergency cleanup of lead-containing materials;

Using lead-containing paints or pigments;

Cutting, brazing, burning, heating, grinding or welding surfaces with lead-containing paints or pigments; and

Soldering with lead-containing solder.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 9-2006, f. & cert. ef. 9-22-06; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9620

Cadmium

Definition: Cadmium means the element cadmium (Cd); and all cadmium compounds.

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in a potential exposure to cadmium.

(2) Work that exposes employees to cadmium must comply with Division 2/Z 1910.1027, Cadmium; except that construction activities exposing employees to cadmium must comply with Division 3/Z, 1926.1127, Cadmium.

NOTE: Construction activities are building, altering, and repairing and include painting.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9626

Chromium (VI)

Definitions: Chromium (VI) (hexavalent chromium or Cr(VI)) means chromium with a valence of positive six, in any form and in any compound.

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in a potential exposure to hexavalent chromium.

(2) Work that exposes employees to hexavalent chromium must comply with Division 2/Z 1910.1026, Chromium (VI); except that construction activities exposing employees to hexavalent chromium must comply with Division 3/Z, 1926.1126, Chromium (VI).

NOTE: Construction activities are building, altering and repairing and include painting.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9640

Benzene

Definition: Benzene (Chemical formula C6H6, CAS 71-43-2) means liquefied or gaseous benzene and includes benzene in liquid mixtures and benzene vapors released by these liquids. It does not include trace amounts of unreacted benzene in solid materials.

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in a potential exposure to benzene.

(2) Tasks or activities within the scope of the Division 2, Benzene rule must comply with Division 2/Z, 1910.1028, Benzene.

(3) Tasks or activities that are not within the scope of the Division 2, Benzene rule must comply with the permissible exposure limits listed in Division 4/Z, OAR 437-004-9000, Table Z-2.

NOTES: An example of a task or activity that is within the scope of the Division 2, Benzene rule is an employee dispensing gasoline or motor fuels containing benzene for more than 4 hours per day in an indoor location.

Examples of task or activities that are NOT within the scope of the Division 2, Benzene rule include: The storage, transportation, distribution, dispensing, sale or use of gasoline, motor fuels, or other fuels containing benzene after final discharge from bulk wholesale storage facilities. The storage, transportation, distribution or sale of benzene or liquid mixtures containing more than 0.1 percent benzene in intact containers while sealed in a way to contain benzene vapors or liquid.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9650

Bloodborne Pathogens

Definitions: Blood means human blood, human blood components and products made from human blood. Bloodborne Pathogens means pathogenic micro-organisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).Contaminated means the presence or the reasonably anticipated presence of blood or other potentially infectious materials on an item or surface. Occupational exposure means reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee’s duties. Other Potentially Infectious Materials means: Human body fluids with visible contamination of blood, and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids; Any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human (living or dead); and HIV-containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV- or HBV-containing culture medium or other solutions; and blood, organs, or other tissues from experi- mental animals infected with HIV or HBV.

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in an occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

(2) Work that exposes employees to bloodborne pathogens must comply with Division 2/Z, 1910.1030, Bloodborne Pathogens.

NOTE: Examples of tasks or work activities with a potential for occupational exposures to bloodborne pathogens in agricultural workplaces include: Employees performing janitorial duties that include cleaning up human blood or OPIM; Employees who are required, as part of their job duties, to administer first aid to others that could include contact with another person’s blood or OPIM.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9710

Acrylonitrile

Definitions: Acrylonitrile or “AN” (Chemical formula CH2=CHCN, CAS 107-13-1) means acrylonitrile monomer and includes Liquid AN. Liquid AN means acrylonitrile monomer in liquid form, and liquid or semi-liquid polymer intermediates, including slurries, suspensions, emulsions, and solutions, made during the polymerization of AN.

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in a potential exposure to acrylonitrile.

(2) Work that exposes employees to acrylonitrile must comply with Division 2/Z, 1910.1045, Acrylonitrile.

NOTE: The Division 2 Acrylonitrile rule does not apply to exposures which result solely from the processing, use, and handling of the following materials:

ABS resins, SAN resins, nitrile barrier resins, solid nitrile elastomers, and acrylic and modacrylic fibers, when these listed materials are in the form of finished polymers, and products fabricated from such finished polymers;

Materials made from and/or containing AN for which objective data is reasonably relied upon to demonstrate that the material is not capable – under the expected conditions of processing, use, and handling which will cause the greatest possible release – of releasing AN in airborne concentrations in excess of 1 ppm as an 8-hour time-weighted average, or

Solid materials made from and/or containing AN which will not be heated above 170 degrees F. during handling, use, or processing.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9740

Ethylene Oxide

Definition: Ethylene oxide or “EtO” means the organic compound with chemical formula C2H4O, and CAS 75-21-8.

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in a potential exposure to ethylene oxide.

(2) Work that exposes employees to ethylene oxide must comply with Division 2/Z, 1910.1047, Ethylene Oxide.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9760

Formaldehyde

DDefinition: Formaldehyde means the substance with chemical formula HCHO and CAS 50 00-0.

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in a potential exposure to formaldehyde.

(2) Work that exposes employees to formaldehyde must comply with Division 2/Z, 1910.1048, Formaldehyde.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9780

Methylendianiline

Definition:

Methylenedianiline or “MDA” means the chemical substance 4,4’-Diaminodiphenylmethane (CAS 101-77-9), in the form of a vapor, liquid, or solid, including the salts of MDA.

(1) The employer is responsible to determine, before work begins, if any task or activity assigned to workers will result in potential exposure to Methylenedianiline.

(2) Work that exposes employees to MDA must comply with Division 2/Z, 1910.1050, Methylenedianiline, except that construction activities exposing employees to MDA must comply with Division 3/D, 1926.60, Methylenedianiline.

NOTE: Construction activities are building, altering and repairing and include painting.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9830

Retention of Department of Transportation (DOT) Markings, Placards and Labels

(1) If you receive any container or vehicle containing hazardous material, marked to comply with U.S. Department of Transportation Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR Parts 171 through 180), you must keep those markings in place and legible until the container is empty enough of product, residue or vapors to eliminate all hazards.

(2) Markings, placards and labels must be readily visible.

(3) For non-bulk packages that will not be reshipped, you are in compliance with this rule if a label or other acceptable marking is affixed to the container and includes the information required by the Hazard Communication Standard.

(4) For this rule, “hazardous material” and other terms not defined here have the same definitions as in the U.S. DOT Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR Parts 171 through 180).

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9850

Pipe Labelling

(1) Scope and application. This rule applies to all pipes that contain hazardous substances or that use asbestos as insulation material. This rule does not apply to buried pipe.

(2) Definitions: Asbestos: includes chrysoltile, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite asbestos, anthophyllite asbestos, actinolite asbestos and any of these minerals that have been chemically treated or altered. Hazardous substances: any substance that is a physical or health hazard. Health hazard: a chemical for which there is statistically significant evidence that acute or chronic health effects may occur in exposed employees. The term “health hazard” includes carcinogens, toxic or highly toxic agents, reproductive toxins, irritants, corrosive sensitizers, hepatotoxins, nephrotoxins, neurotoxins, agents that act on the hematopoietic system, and agents that damage the lungs, skin, eyes or mucous membranes. Physical hazard: includes combustible liquids, compressed gases, explosives, flammables, an organic peroxides, oxidizers, pyrophorics, unstable (reactive) or water reactive substances. Pipes: include pipes, valves and pipe coverings.

(3) Labelling.

(a) Label pipes that contain hazardous substances or transport substances in a hazardous state according to (A), (B), (C) and (D) below or otherwise identify them according to (c) below:

(A) Positive identification of the hazardous contents of pipe must be by lettered labels. The label must give the name of the contents in full or abbreviated form.

(B) The label must identify the contents with enough detail to identify the hazard.

(C) Label wording must be brief, informative and simple.

(D) Use stenciling, tape, adhesives, markers or effective alternative means for labels.

(b) Label pipes with asbestos insulation according to (b)(A) below, or otherwise identify them according to (3)(c) below:

(A) The label for pipe insulation containing asbestos must include the following:

DANGER

CONTAINS ASBESTOS FIBER

AVOID CREATING DUST

CANCER AND LUNG DISEASE HAZARD

(c) The employer may use signs, placards, process sheets, batch tickets, operating procedures, or other such written materials instead of affixing labels to individual pipes, if the alternative method identifies the pipe(s) to which it is applicable and conveys the information required by this rule. The written materials must be readily accessible to the employees in their work areas during each shift.

(4) Location of labelling.

(a) Place the labelling where confusion may occur, such as near valves or flanges and adjacent to changes in direction, branches and where pipes pass through walls, floors or ceilings;

(b) Labelling must be, at a minimum, at the beginning and end of continuous pipe runs; and

(c) For asbestos insulation, labelling must be at a minimum, on unobstructed continuous pipe runs, every 75 feet.

Illustration 1 – Location of Labelling

(5) Visibility.

(a) Where pipes are above or below the normal line of vision, put the lettering below or above the horizontal centerline of the pipe to facilitate visibility.

(b) If pipes are inaccessible and/or at a distance that precludes clear identification of the letters on labelling, use alternatives to the labelling that meet all other requirements of this rule (i.e., schematics posted on walls in work areas).

[ED. NOTE: Illustrations referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13

437-004-9860

Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories

Definitions: Carcinogens are chemicals that have been determined to cause cancer by the following sources:

(1) National Toxicology Program (NTP), Annual Report on Carcinogens (latest edition);

(2) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs (latest edition);

(3) 29 CFR Part 1910, Subpart Z, Toxic and Hazardous Substances, Occupational Safety and Health Administration: or

(4) National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), The Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (latest edition.) Crop- or product-related quality control or quality assurance–type laboratory work means the testing of crops or agricultural products to uncover defects, with the goal of improving or stabilizing production standards. Laboratory use of hazardous chemicals means handling or use of such chemicals in which all of the following conditions are met:

(a) Chemical manipulations are carried out on a “laboratory scale;”

(b) Multiple chemical procedures or chemicals are used;

(c) The procedures involved are not part of a production process, nor in any way simulate a production process; and

(d) Protective laboratory practices and equipment are available and in common use to minimize the potential for employee exposure to hazardous chemicals.

Laboratory scale means work with substances in which the containers used for reactions, transfers, and other handling of substances are designed to be easily and safely manipulated by one person. Laboratory scale does not include those workplaces whose function is to produce commercial quantities of materials.

(5) If employees are engaged only in crop- or product-related quality control or quality assurance-type laboratory work, as defined in this rule, any work with hazardous chemicals must comply with the requirements in OAR 437-004-9800, Hazard Communication.

(6) If employees use carcinogens in laboratory research or crop- or product-related quality control or quality assurance-type laboratory work, then Division 2/Z, OAR 437-002-0391, Additional Oregon Rules for Carcinogens in Laboratories, also applies.

(7) If employees are engaged in the laboratory use of hazardous chemicals, as defined in this rule, then Division 2/Z, 1910.1450, Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories, applies to these activities.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 4-1998, f. 8-28-98, cert. ef. 10-1-98; OSHA 4-2012, f. 9-19-12, cert. ef. 1-1-13


 

Rule Caption: Adopt changes with federal OSHA amendments for hazard communication in general industry, construction, shipyard employment.

Adm. Order No.: OSHA 5-2012

Filed with Sec. of State: 9-25-2012

Certified to be Effective: 9-25-12

Notice Publication Date: 8-1-2012

Rules Amended: 437-002-0005, 437-002-0100, 437-002-0107, 437-002-0118, 437-002-0122, 437-002-0280, 437-002-0288, 437-002-0360, 437-002-0364, 437-002-0377, 437-002-0378, 437-002-0391, 437-003-0001, 437-005-0001

Rules Repealed: 437-002-0289, 437-002-0361, 437-003-0035

Subject: Federal OSHA modified its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to conform to the United Nations’ Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). OSHA determined that the modifications will significantly reduce costs and burdens while also improving the quality and consistency of information provided to employers and employees regarding chemical hazards and associated protective measures. OSHA concluded this improved information will enhance the effectiveness of the HCS in ensuring that employees are apprised of the chemical hazards to which they may be exposed, and in reducing the incidence of chemical-related occupational illnesses and injuries.

 The modifications to the standard include revised criteria for classification of chemical hazards; revised labeling provisions that include requirements for use of standardized signal words, pictograms, hazard statements, and precautionary statements; a specified format for safety data sheets; and related revisions to definitions of terms used in the standard, and requirements for employee training on labels and safety data sheets. OSHA and Oregon OSHA are also modifying provisions of other standards, including standards for flammable and combustible liquids, spray finishing, reinforced plastics, dipping and coating, welding, cutting, and brazing, hazardous waste operations and emergency response, process safety management, pipe labeling, and most substance specific health standards, to ensure consistency with the modified HCS requirements. The consequences of these modifications will be to improve safety, to facilitate global harmonization of standards, and to produce hundreds of millions of dollars in annual savings nationally.

 This rulemaking also repeals three Oregon-initiated rules: OAR 437-002-0289 Precautionary Labels, general requirements in Division 2/Q; 437-002-0361, regarding certain compliance dates for the Ethylene Oxide rule in Division 2/Z; and 437-003-0035 additional rules in hazard communication in Division 3/D. All three rules repealed are obsolete and unnecessary. The text of 1926.59 Hazard Communication in Division 3/D is repealed and a note added to refer the reader to 1910.1200 Hazard Communication in Division 2/Z (same as federal OSHA).

 Please visit our website: www.orosha.org

 Click ‘Rules/Compliance’ in the left vertical column and view our proposed, adopted, and final rules.

Rules Coordinator: Sue C. Joye—(503) 947-7449

437-002-0005

Adoption by Reference

In addition to, and not in lieu of, any other safety and health codes contained in OAR Chapter 437, the Department adopts by reference the following federal regulations printed as part of the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910, in the Federal Register:

(1) 29 CFR 1910.1, Purpose and scope; published 6/27/74, Federal Register, vol. 39, no. 125, p. 23503.

(2) 29 CFR 1910.2, Definitions; published 6/27/74, Federal Register, vol. 39, no. 125, p. 23503.

(3) 29 CFR 1910.3, Petitions for the issuance, amendment, or repeal of a standard; published 6/27/74, Federal Register, vol. 39, no. 125, p. 23503.

(4) 29 CFR 1910.4, Amendments to this part; published 6/27/74, Federal Register, vol. 39, no. 125, p. 23503.

(5) 29 CFR 1910.5, Applicability of standards; published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35308.

(6) 29 CFR 1910.6, Incorporation by reference; published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(7) 29 CFR 1910.7, Definition and requirements for a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory; published 5/11/88, FR vol. 53, no. 91, p. 16838.

(8) 29 CFR 1910.9, Compliance duties owed to each employee; published 12/12/08, Federal Register, vol. 73, no. 240, pp. 75568-75589.

These standards are on file at the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, and the United States Government Printing Office.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: APD 17-1988, f. & ef. 11-10-88; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 8-1999, f. & cert. ef. 8-6-99; OSHA 4-2005, f. & cert. ef 12-14-05; OSHA 4-2007, f. & cert. ef. 8-15-07; OSHA 7-2008, f. & cert. ef. 5-30-08; OSHA 5-2009, f. & cert. ef. 5-29-09; OSHA 1-2010, f. & cert. ef. 2-19-10; OSHA 2-2010, f. & cert. ef. 2-25-10; OSHA 4-2011, f. & cert. ef. 12-8-11; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0100

Adoption by Reference

In addition to, and not in lieu of, any other safety and health codes contained in OAR Chapter 437, the Department adopts by reference the following federal regulations printed as part of the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910, in the Federal Register:

(1) 29 CFR 1910.101 Compressed gases (General requirements), published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9236.

(2) 29 CFR 1910.102 Acetylene. Repealed. Oregon OSHA Admin. Order 1-2010, f. 2/19/10, ef. 2/19/10. In Oregon, OAR 437-002-2102 applies.

(3) 29 CFR 1910.103 Hydrogen, published 12/14/07, FR vol. 72, no. 240, p. 71061.

(4) 29 CFR 1910.104 Oxygen, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9237.

(5) 29 CFR 1910.105 Nitrous oxide, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9237.

(6) 29 CFR 1910.106 Flammable and combustible liquids, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(7) 29 CFR 1910.107 Spray finishing using flammable and combustible materials, amended with AO 3-2003, removed 1910.107, and Oregon note added, f. and ef. 4/21/03.

(8) 29 CFR 1910.108 Reserved. Published 3/23/99, Federal Register, vol. 64, no. 55, p. 13909.

(9) 29 CFR 1910.109 Explosives and blasting agents, published 6/18/98, FR vol. 63, no. 117, p. 33466.

(10) 29 CFR 1910.110 Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases, published 12/14/07, FR vol. 72, no. 240, p. 71061.

(11) 29 CFR 1910.111 Storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia, published amended with AO 12-2001, Oregon note added, f. and ef. 10/26/01; 12/14/07, FR vol. 72, no. 240, p. 71061.

(12) Reserved for 29 CFR 1910.112 (Reserved)

(13) Reserved for 29 CFR 1910.113 (Reserved)

(14) 29 CFR 1910.114 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9238.

(15) 29 CFR 1910.115 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9238.

(16) 29 CFR 1910.116 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9238.

(17) 29 CFR 1910.119 Process safety management of highly hazardous chemicals, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(18) 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous waste operations and emergency response, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(19) 29 CFR 1910.121 Reserved. Published 3/23/99, Federal Register, vol. 64, no. 55, p. 13909.

(20) 29 CFR 1910.122 Table of contents. Repealed with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 9-2007, f. and ef. 12/3/07.

(21) 29 CFR 1910.123 Dipping and coating operations: Coverage and definitions. Repealed with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 9-2007, f. and ef. 12/3/07.

(22) 29 CFR 1910.124 General requirements for dipping and coating operations. Repealed with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 9-2007, f. and ef. 12/3/07.

(23) 29 CFR 1910.125 Additional requirements for dipping and coating operations that use flammable or combustible liquids. Repealed with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 9-2007, f. and ef. 12/3/07.

(24) 29 CFR 1910.126 Additional requirements for special dipping and coating applications. Repealed with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 9-2007, f. and ef. 12/3/07.

These standards are on file with the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, and the United States Government Printing Office.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: APD 19-1988, f. & ef. 11-17-88; APD 12-1989, f. & ef. 7-14-89; OSHA 22-1990, f. 9-28-90, cert. ef. 10-1-90; OSHA 3-1992, f. & cert. ef. 2-6-92; OSHA 3-1993, f. & cert. ef. 2-23-93; OSHA 6-1994, f. & cert. ef. 9-30-94; OSHA 3-1995, f. & cert. ef. 2-22-95; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 3-1998, f. & cert. ef. 7-7-98; OSHA 2-1999, f. & cert. ef. 4-30-99; OSHA 8-1999, f. & cert. ef. 8-6-99; OSHA 12-2001, f. & cert. ef. 10-26-01; OSHA 4-2002, f. & cert. ef. 5-30-02; OSHA 3-2003, f. & cert. ef. 4-21-03; OSHA 4-2004, f. & cert. ef. 9-15-04; OSHA 4-2005, f. & cert. ef 12-14-05; OSHA 4-2006, f. & cert. ef. 7-24-06; OSHA 9-2007, f. & cert. ef. 12-3-07; OSHA 7-2008, f. & cert. ef. 5-30-08; OSHA 1-2010, f. & cert. ef. 2-19-10; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0107

Spray Finishing

(1) Scope. This section applies to finishing materials when applied as a spray by any means in a continuous or intermittent process. This section also covers the application of powders by powder spray guns, electrostatic powder spray guns, fluidized beds, or electrostatic fluidized beds. This section also applies to any sprayed material that produces combustible deposits or residue. This section does not apply to outdoor spray application of buildings, tanks, or other similar structures, nor to small portable spraying apparatus not used repeatedly in the same location.

(2) Definitions:

(a) Aerated solid powders – Any powdered material used as a coating material fluidized within a container by passing air uniformly from below. It is common practice to fluidize such materials to form a fluidized powder bed and then dip the part to be coated into the bed in a manner similar to that used in liquid dipping. Such beds are also used as sources for powder spray operations.

(b) Approved – Approved and listed by a nationally recognized testing laboratory. Refer to §1910.7 for definition of nationally recognized testing laboratory.

(c) Electrostatic fluidized bed – A chamber holding powder coating material that is aerated from below to form an air-supported, expanded cloud of the powder. The powder is electrically charged with a charge opposite to that of the object or material being coated.

(d) Fluidized bed – A chamber holding powder coating material that is aerated from below to form an air-supported, expanded cloud of the powder. The object or material being coated is preheated, then immersed into the cloud.

(e) Infrequent and of short duration – Spray finishing that is:

(A) Less than 9 square feet surface area per job, and

(B) Uses less than 1-gallon of material in 1-day, and

(C) Intermittent spraying where enough time elapses between spraying episodes to dilute the concentration of vapors essentially to zero before spraying is resumed.

(f) Listed – See “approved.”

(g) Noncombustible materials – Materials that have a fire resistance rating of at least 1-hour.

(h) Overspray – Any sprayed material that is not deposited on the intended object.

(i) Spray area – Any area in which potentially dangerous quantities of flammable vapors or mists, or combustible residues, dusts, or deposits are present due to the operation of spraying processes.

(j) Spray booth – A power-ventilated structure provided to enclose or accommodate a spraying operation to confine and limit the escape of spray, vapor, and residue, and to safely conduct or direct them to an exhaust system.

(k) Spray room – A room designed to accommodate a spraying operation. For the purposes of this rule, the term “spray booth” includes spray rooms except where specifically noted.

(3) Rules for All Spray Finishing Operations.

(a) Conduct spray finishing in a spray booth provided with local exhaust ventilation except:

(A) When spraying is infrequent and of short duration; or

(B) When spraying is a single “air brush;” or

(C) The object to be sprayed is of such weight or proportion as to render it impracticable to move it into a spray booth; or

(D) When only liquids with a flashpoint above 199.4 degrees F (93 degrees C) are used. This exception only applies when the liquid is not heated for use to within 30 degrees F (16.7 degrees C) of the flashpoint; or

(E) When spray painting is conducted out-of-doors. For the purposes of this rule, out-of-doors means an area away from the main building and completely open at all times on at least two sides.

(b) Spray finishing outside of a booth, as permitted by OAR 437-002-0107(3)(a)(A), (C), and (D) above, must be done only in a spray area that meets the following requirements:

(A) All light switches, fans, receptacles, overhead lights and all other sources of ignition within 20 horizontal feet and 10 vertical feet of the overspray area must be inoperative or consist of Class I, Group D, explosion-proof types as specified in the National Electrical Code, NFPA 33-2000 and ANSI C2-2002.

(B) All building construction including floors, walls, ceilings, beams, etc., within 20 hori- zontal feet and 10 vertical feet of the overspray area must consist of or be protected by noncombustible materials.

(C) Protect all areas within 20 feet of the overspray area with automatic sprinklers. Where automatic sprinklers are not available, use other automatic extinguishing equipment. Alternatives may be used only when authorized in writing by the local fire authority.

(D) Aisles leading to exits from the spray finishing area must remain clear at all times.

(E) Provide the spray finishing area with at least six air changes per hour of airflow.

(F) Follow the requirements of paragraphs (3)(c) through (3)(e).

(c) Do not allow employees not engaged in spray finishing operations within 20 feet of the spraying and overspray area.

(d) Employees engaged in spray finishing operations must be provided with and wear respiratory protection unless exhaust ventilation is provided and reduces employee exposure to any material in the finish or its solvent to below the limits established in OAR 437-002-0382, Oregon Rules for Air Contaminants. Follow all of the requirements of OAR 437-002-1910.134, Respiratory Protection.

(e) Combustible Materials.

(A) Do not store combustible material or allow combustible material to accumulate in the spraying and overspray area unless specifically authorized in writing by the local fire authority.

(B) Give the spraying and overspray area daily housekeeping and maintenance while in use and keep it free of any accumulations between uses. Use only nonsparking tools for cleaning purposes.

(C) Combustible materials, such as paper, may be used to cover floors and walls in the spray and overspray area, but must be removed at the end of each workshift. The employer may use longer intervals only when the local fire authority has provided written approval to do so.

(f) Spray booths.

(A) Construction:

(i) Construct spray booths of substantially supported steel, concrete, or masonry.

(ii) When the booth is only used for intermittent or low volume spraying, other substantial noncombustible material may be used.

(iii) Design spray booths to sweep air currents toward the exhaust outlet.

(iv) Construct spray booths with materials that have a fire resistance rating of at least 1 hour. All adjacent construction must have a fire resistance rating of at least 1-hour or as otherwise required by the Oregon Building Codes Division.

(B) The interior surfaces of spray booths must be smooth and continuous without edges, designed to prevent residue pocketing, and designed to ease cleaning and washing.

(C) When the floor surface of a spray booth and operators’ working area is combustible, it must be covered with a noncombustible material designed to prevent pocketing of residues and ease cleaning and washing.

(D) A spray booth should be equipped with:

(i) A water washing system designed to minimize dusts or residues entering exhaust ducts and to permit the recovery of overspray finishing material; or

(ii) Distribution or baffle plates to promote an even flow of air through the booth or cause the deposit of overspray before it enters the exhaust duct; or

(iii) Overspray dry filters to minimize dusts or residues entering exhaust ducts.

(E) Where dry powders are sprayed, arrange the powder collection systems in the exhaust to capture oversprayed material.

(F) When distribution or baffle plates are used, they must be of noncombustible material and readily removable or accessible on both sides for cleaning. Such plates will not be located in exhaust ducts.

(G) When using conventional dry type spray booths with overspray dry filters or filter rolls:

(i) Inspect filter rolls to ensure proper replacement of filter media.

(ii) Immediately remove all discarded filter pads and filter rolls to a safe area away from the spray finishing operation. Alternatively, place them in a water-filled metal container and dispose of them at the close of the day’s operation unless they remain completely submerged.

(iii) Do not use filters or filter rolls when spraying a material known to be highly susceptible to spontaneous heating and ignition.

(iv) Clean filters or filter rolls must be noncombustible or authorized by the local fire authority.

(v) Do not use filters and filter rolls alternately for different types of coating materials, where the combination of materials may be conducive to spontaneous ignition.

(H) Spray booths with an open frontal area larger than 9 square feet must have a metal deflector or curtain at least 4 1/2 inches deep installed at the upper outer edge of the booth over the opening.

(I) Where conveyors are used to carry work into or out of spray booths, the openings must be as small as practical.

(J) Separate each spray booth from all other nonspray finishing operations by at least 3 feet, a wall, or a partition. This requirement does not apply to spray rooms.

(K) All portions of the spray booth must be readily accessible for cleaning.

(L) The exterior of the spray booth must have a clear space of at least 3 feet on all sides. Do not store any materials within this clear space. All construction within 3 feet of all sides of the spray booth must be noncombustible. This requirement does not apply to spray rooms.

(i) Exception: This requirement does not prohibit locating a spray booth closer than 3 feet to an exterior wall or roof assembly, provided that the wall or roof is constructed of a noncombustible material and the booth can be cleaned and maintained.

(M) When spraying areas are illuminated through glass panels or other transparent materials, use only fixed lighting units as a source of illumination.

(i) Seal panels to effectively isolate the spraying area from the area in which the lighting unit is located.

(ii) Use only noncombustible material constructed or protected so that breakage will be unlikely. Arrange panels so that normal accumulations of residue on the exposed surface of the panel will not be raised to a dangerous temperature by radiation or conduction from the source of illumination.

(N) Protect all spaces within the spray booth with automatic sprinklers acceptable to the local fire authority.

(i) Sprinkler heads must provide water distribution throughout the entire booth.

(ii) When filters are used, automatic sprinklers must be on both the downstream and upstream sides of the filters.

(iii) Keep sprinkler heads as free of overspray deposits as possible. Clean them daily if necessary. When sprinkler heads are covered to protect them from overspray, the material and method used must be authorized by the local fire authority.

(iv) When automatic sprinklers are infeasible or not practical, other means of fire protection must be provided and authorized in writing by the local fire authority.

(g) Electrical and other sources of ignition.

(A) Do not allow open flame or spark producing equipment within 20 feet of the spray area, unless separated by a partition.

(B) Do not place space-heating appliances, steampipes, or hot surfaces in a spraying area where deposits of combustible residues may readily accumulate.

(C) Ensure all electrical wiring and equipment conforms to the provisions of this paragraph and OAR 437, Division 2, Subdivision S.

(D) Do not put any electrical equipment in the spray or overspray area unless it is specifically approved for those locations. All wiring must be in rigid conduit or in boxes or fittings that do not contain taps, splices, or terminal connections.

(E) Electrical wiring and equipment not subject to deposits of combustible residues but located in a spraying area must be explosion-proof, approved for Class I, Group D locations, and conform to the provisions of OAR 437, Division 2, Subdivision S, for Class I, Division 1, Hazardous Locations. Electrical wiring, motors, and other equipment outside of but within 20 feet of any spraying area, and not separated by partitions, must not produce sparks under normal operating conditions and must conform to the provisions of OAR 437, Division 2, Subdivision S for Class I, Division 2, Hazardous Locations.

(F) Electric lamps outside of any spraying area but within 20 feet, and not separated by a partition, will be totally enclosed to prevent the falling of hot particles and will be protected from physical damage by appropriate guards or by location.

(G) Do not use portable electric lamps in any spraying area during spraying operations. If portable electric lamps are used during cleaning or repairing operations, use only the type approved for hazardous Class I locations.

(H) Electrically ground all metal parts of spray booths and exhaust ducts. Electrically ground piping systems that convey flammable or combustible liquids or aerated solids.

(h) Ventilation.

(A) Provide all spraying areas with mechanical ventilation adequate to remove flammable vapors, mists, or powders to a safe location and confine and control combustible residues so that life is not endangered. Keep mechanical ventilation in operation at all times while spraying operations are being conducted and for a sufficient time afterwards to exhaust vapors from drying material and residue.

(B) Interlock the spraying equipment with the ventilation system so that spraying operations cannot be conducted unless the ventilation system is operating.

(C) Air velocity throughout the spray booth must be sufficient to keep airborne contaminants below 25 percent of their lower explosive limit (LEL).

(i) Open-faced booths must maintain at least an average of 100 feet per minute (fpm) of airflow across the open face of the booth.

(ii) Enclosed booths must maintain at least an average of 100 fpm of airflow of cross-sectional area at the operators’ position.

(iii) Any deviation from the above must be authorized in writing by the local fire authority.

(iv) Install a visible gauge, audible alarm, or pressure activated device on each spray booth to indicate or ensure that the required air velocity is maintained.

(D) Provide each spray booth with an independent exhaust duct system that discharges to the exterior of the building. A common exhaust system may be used for multiple spray booths only when identical materials are sprayed and the combined frontal area of those booths is no more than 18 square feet.

(E) When more than one fan serves one booth, interconnect all fans so that one fan cannot operate without all fans being operated.

(F) The fan-rotating element must be nonferrous or nonsparking or the casing must consist of or be lined with such material.

(i) Maintain ample clearance between the fan-rotating element and the fan casing to avoid a fire by friction. Prevent contact between moving parts and the duct or fan housing by making allowance for ordinary expansion and loading.

(ii) Mount fan blades on a shaft sufficiently heavy to maintain perfect alignment even when the blades of the fan are heavily loaded.

(iii) All bearings must be of the self-lubricating type, or lubricated from the outside duct.

(G) Place electric motors driving exhaust fans outside booths or ducts. See also paragraph (3)(g) of this section.

(H) When belts and pulleys are inside the duct or booth, they must be thoroughly enclosed.

(I) Construct exhaust ducts of substantially supported steel. Exhaust ducts without dampers are preferred; however, if dampers are installed, they must be fully opened when the ventilating system is in operation.

(i) Protect exhaust ducts against mechanical damage and maintain a clearance of at least 18 inches from unprotected combustible construction or other combustible material.

(ii) If combustible construction is provided with the following protection applied to all surfaces within 18 inches of the exhaust duct, clearances may be reduced to the distances indicated:

(I) 28-gage sheet metal on 1/4-inch insulating millboard 12 inches.

(II) 28-gage sheet metal on 1/8-inch insulating millboard spaced out 1 inch on noncombustible spacers 9 inches.

(III) 22-gage sheet metal on 1-inch rockwool batts reinforced with wire mesh or the equivalent 3 inches.

(J)The terminal discharge point must be at least 6 feet from any combustible exterior wall or roof. The discharge point must not discharge in the direction of any combustible construction or unprotected opening in any noncombustible exterior wall within 30 feet.

(K) Keep air exhaust from spray operations away from makeup air or other ventilation intakes. Do not recirculate air exhausted from spray operations.

(L) Supply clean fresh air, free of contamination from adjacent industrial exhaust systems, chimneys, stacks, or vents, to a spray booth in quantities equal to the volume of air exhausted through the spray booth.

(M) Provide exhaust ducts with an ample number of access doors when necessary to facilitate cleaning.

(N) Provide air intake openings to rooms containing spray finishing operations adequate for the efficient operation of exhaust fans and placed to minimize the creation of dead air pockets.

(O) Dry freshly sprayed articles only in spaces provided with adequate ventilation to prevent the formation of explosive vapors. Drying spaces without adequate ventilation will be considered a spraying area. See also paragraph (6) of this section.

(4) Rules for Spray Finishing with Flammable Liquids.

(a) These rules apply to spray finishing with flammable liquids with a flashpoint below 199.4 degrees F (93 degrees C). These rules only apply to liquids with a flashpoint above 199.4 degrees F (93 degrees C) when they are heated for use to within 30 degrees F (16.7 degrees C) of their flashpoint.

(b) Flammable liquids – storage and handling.

(A) Store flammable in compliance with the requirements of OAR 437-002-1910.106.

(B) Keep only the minimum quantity of flammable liquids required for operations in the vicinity of spraying operations and do not exceed a supply for one day or one shift. Bulk storage of portable containers of flammable liquids must be in a separate, constructed building detached from other important buildings or cut off in a standard manner.

(C) Use only the original closed containers, approved portable tanks, approved safety cans, or a properly arranged system of piping for bringing flammable liquids into the spray area. Do not use open or glass containers.

(D) Use approved pumps to withdraw flammable liquids from containers with a capacity of 61 gallons or more except as provided in paragraph (4)(b)(F) of this section.

(E) Withdraw and fill containers with flammable liquids only in a suitable mixing room or in a spraying area when the ventilating system is in operation. Take adequate precautions to protect against spilling liquids and sources of ignition.

(F) Containers must conform to the following requirements:

(i) Use only closed containers to supply spray nozzles. Use metal covers to close containers that are not closed.

(ii) Use metal supports or wire cables to support containers that are not resting on floors.

(iii) When spray nozzles are supplied by gravity flow, do not use containers that exceed 10 gallons capacity.

(iv) Do not use air pressure in the original shipping containers to supply spray nozzles.

(G) Containers under air pressure supplying spray nozzles must also conform to the following requirements

(i) Use only limited capacity containers that only hold enough material for one day’s operation.

(ii) Use only containers that are designed and approved for such use.

(iii) Provide containers with a visible pressure gauge.

(iv) Containers must be provided with a relief valve set to operate in conformance with the requirements of the Oregon Building Codes Division OAR 918-225, “Boilers and Pressure Vessels.”

(H) Pipes and hoses.

(i) All containers or piping with an attached hose or flexible connection must have a shutoff valve at the connection. Keep such valves shut when not spraying.

(ii) When a pump is used to deliver the liquid used in a spray application process, use only piping, tubing, hoses, and accessories that are designed to withstand the maximum working pressure of the pump. Alternatively, provide automatic means to limit the discharge pressure of the pump to a level within the design working pressure of the piping, tubing, hoses, and accessories.

(iii) Inspect all pressure hose and couplings at regular intervals appropriate to this service. Test the hose and couplings with the hose extended using the “inservice maximum operating pressures.” Repair or discard any hose showing material deteriorations, signs of leakage, or weakness in its’ carcass or at the couplings.

(iv) Piping systems conveying flammable liquids must be of steel or other material having comparable properties of resistance to heat and physical damage. Properly bond and ground piping systems.

(I) Use approved and listed electrically powered spray liquid heaters. Do not put heaters in spray booths or any other location subject to the accumulation of deposits or combustible residue.

(J) If flammable liquids are supplied to spray nozzles by positive displacement pumps, use an approved relief valve on the pump discharge line that discharges to a pump suction or a safe detached location, or use a device provided to stop the prime mover if the discharge pressure exceeds the safe operating pressure of the system.

(K) Whenever flammable liquids are transferred from one container to another, effectively bond and ground both containers to prevent discharge sparks of static electricity.

(c) Install an adequate supply of suitable portable fire extinguishers near all spraying areas.

(d) Operations and maintenance.

(A) Immediately remove and dispose residue scrapings and debris contaminated with residue from the premises. Deposit all rags or waste impregnated with finishing material in tightly-closing metal waste cans immediately after use. Properly dispose of the contents of waste cans at least once daily or at the end of each shift.

(B) Do not leave clothing worn during spray finishing on the premises overnight unless kept in metal lockers.

(C) Only use solvents for cleaning operations with flashpoints at or above the flashpoints of material normally used. Cleaning operations must be done inside a spray booth with the ventilation system on, or an area authorized in writing by the local fire authority.

(D) Do not alternately use spray booths for different types of coating materials when the materials are incompatible with each other, unless all deposits of the first used material are removed from the booth and exhaust ducts prior to spraying with the second material.

(e) Mixing.

(A) Mix materials only in a mixing room, a spray area that meets the requirements of (3)(b), or in a spray booth. When a spray area or spray booth is used for mixing, the ventilation system must be on.

(B) Construct mixing rooms of substantially supported steel, concrete, or masonry. Use only noncombustible materials to construct mixing rooms.

(C) Design mixing rooms so that any spills remain inside the room.

(D) Provide at least 150 cubic feet per minute (CFM) of airflow in each mixing room. When the flooring of the mixing room is greater than 150 square feet, provide at least 1 CFM per square foot of flooring. The ventilation system for each mixing room must be on and operational at all times.

(E) Follow all of the provisions of paragraph (3)(g).

(F) Protect all spaces within the mixing room with automatic sprinklers acceptable to the local fire authority. Where automatic sprinklers are not available, use other automatic extinguishing equipment. Alternatives may be used only when authorized in writing by the local fire authority.

(5) Rules for Electrostatic Spray Finishing.

(a) Fixed electrostatic apparatus.

(A) Use only approved electrostatic apparatus and devices in connection with coating operations.

(B) Transformers, power packs, control apparatus, and all other electrical portions of the equipment, with the exception of high-voltage grids, electrodes, and electrostatic atomizing heads and their connections, must be located outside of the spraying area, or must otherwise conform to the requirements of paragraph (3) of this section.

(C) Adequately support electrodes and electrostatic atomizing heads in permanent locations and effectively insulate them from the ground. Electrodes and electrostatic atomizing heads which are permanently attached to their bases, supports, or reciprocators are considered to comply with this section. Use only nonporous and noncombustible insulators.

(D) Properly insulate and protect high-voltage leads to electrodes from mechanical injury or exposure to destructive chemicals. Effectively and permanently support electrostatic atomizing heads on suitable insulators and effectively guard against accidental contact or grounding. Provide an automatic means for grounding the electrode system when it is electrically de-energized for any reason. Keep all insulators clean and dry.

(E) Maintain a safe distance between goods being painted and electrodes or electrostatic atomizing heads or conductors of at least twice the sparking distance. Conspicuously post a sign indicating this safe distance near the assembly.

(F) Support goods being painted using this process on conveyors. Arrange the conveyors to maintain safe distances between the goods and the electrodes or electrostatic atomizing heads at all times. Any irregularly shaped or other goods subject to possible swinging or movement must be rigidly supported to prevent swinging or movement which would reduce the clearance to less than that specified in paragraph (5)(a)(E) of this section.

(G) Equip electrostatic apparatus with automatic controls that immediately disconnect the power supply to the high voltage transformer and signals the operator when:

(i) Any failure occurs in the ventilation equipment.

(ii) The conveyor carrying goods through the high voltage field stops.

(iii) Occurrence of a ground or of an imminent ground at any point on the high voltage system.

(iv) The safe distance required by (5)(a)(E) is not maintained.

(H) Place adequate booths, fencing, railings, or guards around the equipment to assure, either by their location or character or both, that a safe isolation of the process is maintained from plant storage or personnel. Construct such railings, fencing, and guards of conducting material that is adequately grounded.

(b) Electrostatic hand spraying equipment.

(A) This paragraph applies to any equipment that uses electrostatically charged elements for the atomization and/or, precipitation of materials for coatings on articles, or for other similar purposes in which the atomizing device is hand held and manipulated during the spraying operation.

(B) Use only approved electrostatic hand spray apparatus and devices in connection with coating operations. The high voltage circuits must be designed so it does not produce a spark of sufficient intensity to ignite any vapor-air mixtures or result in appreciable shock hazard upon coming in contact with a grounded object under all normal operating conditions. The electrostatically charged exposed elements of the handgun must be capable of being energized only by a switch which also controls the coating material supply.

(C) Locate transformers, powerpacks, control apparatus, and all other electrical portions of the equipment outside of the spraying area. This requirement does not apply to the handgun itself and its connections to the power supply.

(D) Electrically connect the handle of the spraying gun to ground by a metallic connection. Ensure that the operator in normal operating position is in intimate electrical contact with the grounded handle.

(E) Adequately ground all electrically conductive objects in the spraying area. This requirement applies to paint containers, wash cans, and any other objects or devices in the area. Prominently and permanently install a warning on the equipment regarding the necessity for this grounding feature.

(F) Maintain metallic contact between objects being painted or coated and the conveyor or other grounded support. Regularly clean hooks to ensure this contact.

(G) Areas of contact must be sharp points or knife edges where possible.

(H) Conceal points of support of the object from random spray where feasible.

(I) When objects being sprayed are supported from a conveyor, the point of attachment to the conveyor must not collect spray material during normal operation.

(J) Interlock the electrical equipment with the ventilation of the spraying area so that the equipment cannot be operated unless the ventilation fans are on.

(6) Drying, Curing, or Fusion Apparatus.

(a) Drying, curing, or fusion equipment.

(A) Equipment manufactured or modified on or before June 1, 2003, must comply with the provisions of the Standard for ovens and furnaces, NFPA No. 86A-1969 where applicable.

(B) Equipment manufactured or modified after June 1, 2003, must comply with the provisions of the Standard for Ovens and Furnaces, NFPA No. 86-1999 where applicable.

(b) Do not use a spray area for drying when such drying can increase the surface temperature of the spray area.

(c) Except as specifically provided in paragraph (6)(e) of this section, do not install an open flame heating system for drying, curing, or fusion in a spray area.

(d) Drying, curing, or fusion units may be installed adjacent to spray areas only when equipped with an interlocked ventilating system arranged to:

(A) Thoroughly ventilate the drying space before the heating system can be started;

(B) Maintain a safe atmosphere at any source of ignition;

(C) Automatically shut down the heating system in the event of failure of the ventilating system.

(e) Automobile refinishing spray booths or enclosures, otherwise installed and meeting the requirements of this section, may alternately be used for drying with portable electrical infrared drying apparatus that meets the following:

(A) Keep the interior (especially floors) of spray enclosures free of overspray deposits.

(B) Keep the apparatus out of the spray and overspray area while spray finishing is in progress.

(C) Equip the spraying apparatus, the drying apparatus, and the ventilating system of the spray enclosure with suitable interlocks arranged so:

(i) The spraying apparatus cannot be operated while the drying apparatus is inside the spray enclosure.

(ii) The spray enclosure is purged of spray vapors for at least 3 minutes before the drying apparatus is energized.

(iii) The ventilating system maintains a safe atmosphere within the enclosure during the drying process, and the drying apparatus will automatically shut off in the event of failure of the ventilating system.

(D) All electrical wiring and equipment of the drying apparatus must meet the applicable sections of OAR 437, Division 2, Subdivision S. Only equipment of a type approved for Class I, Division 2 hazardous locations will be located within 18 inches of floor level. All metallic parts of the drying apparatus will be properly electrically bonded and grounded.

(E) Place a warning sign on the drying apparatus indicating that ventilation must be maintained during the drying period and that spraying must not be conducted in the vicinity where spray will deposit on apparatus.

(7) Powder Coating.

(a) Ventilation.

(A) Ensure that exhaust ventilation is sufficient to maintain the atmosphere below the lowest explosive limits for the materials being applied. Ensure that all nondeposited air-suspended powders are safely removed via exhaust ducts to the powder recovery cyclone or receptacle.

(B) Do not release powders to the outside atmosphere.

(b) Operation and maintenance.

(A) Keep all areas free of the accumulation of powder coating dusts, particularly horizontal surfaces as ledges, beams, pipes, hoods, booths, and floors.

(B) Clean surfaces in a manner to avoid scattering dust to other places or creating dust clouds.

(C) Conspicuously post “No Smoking” signs in large letters on contrasting color background at all powder coating areas and powder storage rooms.

(c) Electrostatic fluidized beds.

(A) Use only approved electrostatic fluidized beds and associated equipment.

(B) Ensure that the maximum surface temperature of this equipment in the coating area does not exceed 150 degrees F.

(C) Use only high voltage circuits that will not produce a spark of sufficient intensity to ignite any powder-air mixtures.

(D) Use circuits designed to eliminate shock hazards upon coming in contact with a grounded object under normal operating conditions.

(E) Locate transformers, powerpacks, control apparatus, and all other electrical portions of the equipment outside of the powder coasting area, with the exception of the charging electrodes and their connections to the power supply.

(F) Adequately ground all electrically conductive objects within the charging influence of the electrodes. The powder coating equipment must carry a prominent, permanently installed warning regarding the necessity for grounding these objects.

(G) Objects being coated will be maintained in contact with the conveyor or other support in order to ensure proper grounding. Regularly clean hangers to ensure effective contact and areas of contact will be sharp points or knife edges where possible.

(H) Interlock the electrical equipment with the ventilation system so the equipment cannot be operated unless the ventilation fans are in operation.

[Publications: Publications referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 2-1992, f. 2-6-92, cert. ef. 5-1-92; OSHA 3-2003, f. & cert. ef. 4-21-03; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0118

Reinforced Plastics Manufacturing

(1) Applicability. If a specific type of equipment, process or practice is not limited to the reinforced plastics industry, the provisions contained in other Divisions of OAR 437, Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Code, shall apply.

(2) Scope.

(a) These rules shall apply to reinforced plastics manufacturing operations, in their shop buildings (not field work) involving the use of polyester, vinylester, and other similar products in which styrene monomer is a reactive monomer for the resin. This division applies to chopper gun, gel coating, hand laminating and casting operations utilizing resin and organic peroxide catalyst.

(b) This division does not apply to:

(A) Application of flammable organic materials such as acetone, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), either alone or mixed as flammable paints or diluents;

(B) Operations, involving polyurethane finishes or foams utilizing isocyanate catalysts;

(C) Operations involving epoxy resin compounds utilizing amine hardeners; or

(D) Cleaning of chopper guns, lines, and associated equipment in which acetone, MEK, or other flammable organic solvents are sprayed into the open air as part of the cleaning process.

(3) Definitions. The following definitions shall apply to OAR 437-002-0118:

(a) Chopper Gun — A device that feeds fiber glass rovings through a chopper and ejects them into a stream of resin and organic peroxide catalyst onto a mold surface. The resin and organic peroxide catalyst are combined and ejected from the chopper gun by either one of two systems:

(A) One nozzle ejects resin while another nozzle ejects organic peroxide catalyst towards the mold surface; or

(B) The resin and organic peroxide catalyst are fed into a single chopper gun mixing chamber ahead of the nozzle.

NOTE: By either method, the resin mixture precoats the strands of glass and the merged product is directed onto a mold surface by the operator.

(b) Flammable liquid means any liquid having a flashpoint at or below 199.4 degrees F (93 degrees C). Flammable liquids are divided into four categories as follows:

(A) Category 1 shall include liquids having flashpoints below 73.4 degrees F (23 degrees C) and having a boiling point at or below 95 degrees F (35 degrees C).

(B) Category 2 shall include liquids having flashpoints below 73.4 degrees F (23 degrees C) and having a boiling point above 95 degrees F (35 degrees C).

(C) Category 3 shall include liquids having flashpoints at or above 73.4 degrees F (23 degrees C) and at or below 140 degrees F (60 degrees C). When a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint at or above 100 degrees F (37.8 degrees C) is heated for use to within 30 degrees F (16.7 degrees C) of its flashpoint, it shall be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint below 100 degrees F (37.8 degrees C).

(D) Category 4 shall include liquids having flashpoints above 140 degrees F (60 degrees C) and at or below 199.4 degrees F (93 degrees C). When a Category 4 flammable liquid is heated for use to within 30 degrees F (16.7 degrees C) of its flashpoint, it shall be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint at or above 100 degrees F (37.8 degrees C).

(c) Flashpoint – The minimum temperature at which a liquid gives off vapor within a test vessel in sufficient concentration to form an ignitable mixture shall be determined as follows:

(A) For a liquid which has a viscosity of less than 45 SUS at 100 degrees F (37.8 degrees C), does not contain suspended solids, and does not have a tendency to form a surface film while under test, the procedure specified in the Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Tag Closed Tester (ASTM D-56-70), which is incorporated by reference as specified in 1910.6, or an equivalent test method as defined in Appendix B to OAR 437-002-1910.1200 – Physical Hazard Criteria, shall be used.

(B) For a liquid which has a viscosity of 45 SUS or more at 100 degrees F (37.8 degrees C), or contains suspended solids, or has a tendency to form a surface film while under test, the Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Pensky-Martens Closed Tester (ASTM D-93-71) or an equivalent method as defined by Appendix B to OAR 437-002-1910.1200 – Physical Hazard Criteria, shall be used except that the methods specified in Note 1 to section 1.1 of ASTM D-93-71 may be used for the respective materials specified in the Note. The preceding ASTM standard is incorporated by reference as specified in OAR 437-002-1910.6.

(C) For a liquid that is a mixture of compounds that have different volatilites and flashpoints, its flashpoint shall be determined by using the procdures in subsection (3)(c)(A) or (3)(c)(B) of this definition on the liquid in the form it is shipped.

(D) Organic peroxide catalysts are excluded from any of the flashpoint determination methods specified in this section.

(d) Gelcoating – A chopper gun pressure pot or similar device is used to apply the resin and organic peroxide catalyst mixture to a mold surface without glass fibers;

(e)Hand Laminating – Resin is mixed with organic peroxide catalyst and applied by hand with a brush, squeegee, or roller with fiber glass reinforcements.

(f) Hazard – A substance, process, practice or condition which could result in an injury or illness to an employee.

(g) Resin – A mixture of true esters dissolved in a polymerizable monomer (styrene).

(h) Threshold-Limit Value – Short Term Exposure Limit (TLV-STEL) – The maximum concentration to which workers can be exposed for a period of up to 15 minutes continuously without suffering from (a) irritation, (b) chronic or irreversible tissue change, or (c) narcosis of sufficient degree to increase accident proneness, impair self-rescue, or materially reduce work efficiency, provided that no more than four excursions per day are permitted, with at least 60 minutes between exposure periods, and provided that the daily TLV-TWA also is not exceeded. The STEL should be considered a maximum allowable concentration, or ceiling, not to be exceeded at any time during the 15-minute excursion period.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

(4) Permissible Exposure Limits.

(a) An employee’s exposure to any material listed in Table 1, in any 8-hour workshift of a 40-hour work week, shall not exceed the 8-hour time-weighted average limit for that material in the table.

(b) An employee’s exposure to a material listed in Table 1 shall not exceed, at any time during an 8-hour shift, the TLV-STEL level given for the material in the table, except for a time period, and up to a concentration not exceeding the maximum duration and concentration allowed in the column under “Acceptable Maximum Peak.”

(c) Employee exposure to other airborne contaminants shall be in accordance with OAR 437, Division 2, Subdivision Z, 1910.1000, Air Contaminants, and other applicable regulations.

NOTE: In the Oregon Rules for Reinforced Plastics Manufacturing, Table 1, Permissible Exposure Limits, in OAR 437-002-0118(4), has been revised to reflect the current limits in OAR 437-002-0382, Oregon Rules for Air Contaminants, which were adopted on 11/15/93 in lieu of 1910.1000, Air Contaminants. Table.

(5) Methods of Compliance.

(a) To achieve compliance with OAR 437-002-0118(4), Permissible Exposure Limits, administrative or engineering controls must first be determined and implemented whenever feasible.

(b) When such controls are not feasible to achieve full compliance, protective measures as prescribed in OAR 437, Division 2/I, Personal Protective Equipment, shall be used to keep the exposure of employees to airborne contaminants within the limits prescribed in OAR 437-002-0118.

(6) Employee Information and Training. A training program shall be established and all affected employees shall be trained regarding the safe handling of materials used in the industry which shall include instruction in storage, handling large and small quantities, cleanup and disposal of spills, first aid for spills, equipment training, potential health and safety hazards, personal hygiene, personal protective measures, and the labeling system.

(7) Personal Protective Equipment.

(a) Safety glasses shall be worn at all times by personnel working in the manufacturing area of reinforced plastics plants.

(b) Face shields and safety glasses shall be worn when opening and filling pressurized catalyst injection equipment.

(c) An eyewash fountain shall be provided no more than 25 feet or 15 seconds of actual travel from a work area where MEK peroxide is being mixed or transferred.

(A) The criteria of 25 feet shall apply if the employee is working alone.

(B) The criteria of 15 seconds shall apply if other employees are close enough under normal working conditions to provide assistance and a formal training program which includes emergency first aid procedures for eye protection has been implemented.

(d) Clothing saturated or impregnated with flammable liquids, corrosive or toxic substances, irritants, or oxidizing agents, that present a health hazard to employees shall be removed and disposed of, or properly cleaned before reuse; however, clothing coated with cured resin may be worn.

(8) Warning Signs and Labels.

(a) Label chemical containers in accordance with OAR 437-002-1910.1200, Hazard Communication.

(b) Where extreme occupational health hazards are known to exist in the workplace, the employer shall provide warning signs or other equally effective means of calling attention to such hazards at the location where the hazards exist.

(9) Housekeeping.

(a) Housekeeping shall be sufficient to keep accumulations of combustible residues to a minimum as practical.

(b) All combustible and flammable residues shall be placed in covered noncombustible containers.

(c) To prevent excessive permanent buildup of overspray and overchop, the use of paper, polyethylene film, building or roofing paper or other similar sheet material shall be permitted on side walls and floors of chopper gun and gelcoat areas.

(A) When the accumulated depth of overchop and/or gelcoat has reached an average thickness of 2 inches in the overspray area, it shall be disposed of after at least 4 hours curing.

(B) A single day’s accumulation of more than an average of 2 inches shall be permitted provided it is disposed of before operations are resumed the next day.

(d) Excess catalyzed resin inside a building shall be disposed of in open-topped containers provided with bar screens, large mesh wire screens, or other means, to support individual containers across its top through which surplus catalyzed resin can be poured and upon which empty containers that once held catalyzed resin can be placed to cure. The open-topped containers shall contain water at least 2 inches deep in which the resin shall be poured and permitted to cure in a safe fashion. Containers can be used until filled with setup resin and disposed of along with other nontoxic waste.

(10) Hygiene Facilities and Practices. If acetone is used directly on the skin to clean hands, barrier or a therapeutic cream must be made available to the employee. Gloves shall be provided should any employee wish additional protection.

(11) Storage and Handling of Flammable Liquids.

(a) The storage and handling of acetone and other Category 1-3 flammable liquids for cleanup and gun flushing shall be subject to the following requirements:

(A) Category 1-3 flammable solvents shall be kept in containers that are covered during storage;

(B) Areas within the shop where acetone or other Category 1-3 flammable solvents are transferred into containers less than 5 gallons each shall be considered Class I, Division 1 areas for a 5-foot radius around the point of transfer, and Class I Division 2, for an additional 5 feet outside of the area; and

(C) “Dirty” acetone in small individual cleanup containers of less than 5 gallons each may be handled by pouring into a larger container suitable for disposal or recycling which shall be kept covered.

(b) The following subsections shall apply to chopper gun or gelcoating areas:

(A) Areas where flammable liquids are used, shall be protected by automatic sprinklers or equivalent extinguishing systems. If a special extinguishing system including, but not limited to, those employing foam, carbon dioxide, or dry chemical is provided, approved equipment shall be used and installed in an approved manner.

(B) Exhaust fans mounted 4 feet or less, as measured from the invert (bottom) of the duct above the floor, shall have nonsparking fan blades, and

(i) A motor mounted external to the air stream in a nonexplosive atmosphere. The fan shall be driven by an interconnecting belt.

(ii) Those fans having air suction ducts 4 feet or less above the floor shall comply with subsection (11)(b)(B).

(C) Exhaust fans mounted more than 4 feet above the floor shall have nonsparking fan blades.

(D) All other electrical equipment in chopper gun or gelcoating operations must conform to the requirements of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 33-1989.

(c) Acetone and other Category 1-3 flammable liquids shall be transferred only though a closed piping system from a safety can by means of a device drawing through the top or from a container or portable tank by gravity through an approved self-closing valve. The nozzle and container shall be electrically interconnected.

(d) Acetone shall be kept in covered containers when not in use.

(e) Special input and exhaust ventilation shall be provided where employees must be inside or under the item being fabricated (e.g., inside a pipe or boat hull or under a large fabricated shape) to keep air concentrations of hazardous and/or flammable materials at or below 25 percent of the lower explosive limit and employee exposure at or below the permissible exposure limit.

(f) Areas where flammable materials are handled shall either be posted with “No Smoking” signs, or smoking shall be prohibited throughout plant, manufacturing and storage areas.

(g) Storage and handling of flammable liquids not addressed in these rules shall meet the requirements of 1910.106, Flammable Liquids.

(12) Storage and Handling of Organic Peroxide Catalysts.

(a) Organic peroxide catalysts shall be isolated and stored in their original containers in a cool place under 100 degrees F (37.8 degrees C), away from other flammable materials and ignition sources.

(b) Organic peroxide catalyst containers shall be covered or kept closed at all times.

(c) Organic peroxide catalysts shall be brought into the area of use in no more than two consecutive days’ supply.

(d) Larger than 8-pound containers of organic peroxide catalyst shall not be permitted outside designated catalyst storage areas, except for hand layup operations or for filling the catalyst reservoir of chopper gun and gelcoat equipment.

(e) When organic peroxide catalyst is being poured into the catalyst reservoir of chopper gun and gelcoat equipment, the catalyst container shall be equipped with a special curved pouring spout or other device which directs the catalyst into the reservoir without splashing.

(A) A supply of water of not less than 1-gallon shall be permanently installed on the chopper gun or gelcoat apparatus to wet down any catalyst spills which may occur due to overfilling. Catalyst spills shall be absorbed in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations.

(B) Immediately after filling the chopper gun or gelcoat apparatus with catalyst, the empty or partially filled catalyst container shall be removed immediately before commencement of any other operation.

(13) Fire Protection. Areas where flammable materials are handled shall either be posted with “No Smoking” signs, or smoking shall be prohibited throughout plant, manufacturing and storage areas.

(14) Ventilation.

(a) Special input and exhaust ventilation shall be provided where employees must be inside or under the item being fabricated (e.g., inside a pipe or boat hull or under a large fabricated shape) to keep air concentrations of hazardous and/or flammable materials at or below 25 percent of the lower explosive limit and employee exposure at or below the permissible exposure limit.

(b) During cleanup and gun flushing with acetone or other Category 1-3 flammable liquids, sufficient ventilation shall be provided to maintain air concentrations below 25 percent of the lower explosive limit (LEL) and employee exposure at or below the permissible exposure limit.

(c) Where acetone and Category 1-3 flammable solvents are used in physical operations (e.g., mixing), there shall be a minimum ventilation rate of 1 cubic foot per minute per square foot of floor area in the immediate work area.

[Publications: Publications referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 2-1992, f. 2-6-92, cert. ef. 5-1-92; OSHA 6-1994, f. & cert. ef. 9-30-94; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0122

Dipping and Coating.

(1) Scope.

(a) This rule applies to all operations where an object is partially or fully immersed in a liquid, or the vapors of a liquid. Such operations include, but are not limited to, cleaning, coating, altering the surface of an object, or changing the character of an object. Examples of covered operations are paint dipping, electroplating, pickling, quenching, tanning, degreasing, stripping, cleaning, roll coating, flow coating, and curtain coating. This rule also applies to draining or drying an object that has been dipped or coated.

(b) This rule does not apply to tanks that contain only water or a molten material.

(2) Definitions. Adjacent area: Any area within 20 feet (6.1 m) of a vapor area that is not separated from the vapor area by tight partitions. Approved: The equipment is listed or approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory. Autoignition temperature: The minimum temperature required to cause self-sustained combustion, independent of any other source of heat.Dip tank: A container holding a liquid other than water and is used for dipping or coating. An object may be immersed (or partially immersed) in a dip tank or it may be suspended in a vapor coming from the tank. Flammable liquid: A liquid having a flashpoint at or below 199.4 degrees F (93 degrees C). Flashpoint: The minimum temperature at which a liquid gives off a vapor in sufficient concentration to ignite if tested in accordance with the test methods in Appendix B to OAR 437-002-1920.1200 – Physical Hazard Criteria. Lower flammable limit (LFL): The lowest concentration of a material that will propagate a flame. The LFL is usually expressed as a percent by volume of the material in air (or other oxidant). Vapor area: Any space containing a dip tank, including its drain boards, associated drying or conveying equipment, and any surrounding area where the vapor concentration exceeds 25% of the LFL of the liquid in the tank.

(3) Any container used as a dip tank must be strong enough to withstand any expected load.

(4) Ventilation.

(a) Ensure airborne concentrations of materials in any vapor area do not exceed 25% of its LFL.

(b) A tank cover or material that floats on the surface of the liquid in a dip tank to replace or supplement ventilation is acceptable, as long as the airborne concentrations do not exceed 25% of the LFL or any limit established by Division 2, Subdivision Z.

(c) When mechanical ventilation is used, it must conform to design standards based on national consensus standards that meet the following:

(A) The standard specifies the safety requirements for the particular equipment;

(B) The standard is recognized in the United States as providing specifications that result in an adequate level of safety;

(C) The standard was developed by a standards development organization under a method providing for input and consideration of views of industry groups, experts, users, govern- mental authorities, and others having broad experience and expertise in issues related to the design and construction of the particular equipment.

(d) Nonmandatory appendix A of this section contains examples of consensus standards that meet the requirements of paragraph (4)(c) of this section.

(e) When mechanical ventilation is used, each dip tank must have an independent exhaust system unless the combination of substances being removed will not cause a fire, explosion, or chemical reaction.

(f) When mechanical ventilation is used, it must draw the flow of air into a hood or exhaust duct.

(A) Ensure each room with exhaust hoods has make-up airflow that is at least 90% of the volume of air exhausted.

(B) Ensure that make-up air does not damage exhaust hoods.

(C) When air is recirculated, it must meet the requirements of OAR 437-002-0081, “Oregon Ventilation Regulations.”

(g) Inspect hoods and ventilation ductwork for corrosion or damage at least quarterly and prior to operation after a prolonged shutdown.

(h) Ensure the ventilation airflow is adequate at least quarterly and prior to operation after a prolonged shutdown.

(5) Periodically inspect all dipping and coating equipment, including covers, drains, overflow piping, and electrical and fire-extinguishing systems, and promptly correct any deficiencies.

(6) Thoroughly clean dip tanks of solvents and vapors before permitting welding, burning, or open-flame work.

(7) Provide mechanical ventilation or respirators (selected and used as specified in 1910.134, Respiratory Protection) to protect employees in the vapor area from exposure to toxic substances released during welding, burning, or open-flame work.

(8) Medical, first aid, and hygiene facilities.

(a) All employees working with or around dip tanks must know the first-aid procedures appropriate to the dipping and coating hazards to which they are exposed.

(b) When employees work with liquids that may burn, irritate, or otherwise harm their skin:

(A) Obtain a physician’s approval before an employee with a sore, burn, or other skin lesion that requires medical attention can return to work in a vapor area.

(B) Only a properly designated person can provide treatment for any skin abrasion, cut, rash, or open sore.

(C) Keep appropriate first-aid supplies near dipping or coating operations.

(D) Provide employees who work with chromic acid periodic examinations, at least annually, of their exposed body parts, especially their nostrils.

(E) Provide locker space or other storage space to prevent contamination of employee’s street clothes.

(F) Provide at least one basin with hot water for every 10 employees who work with such liquids.

(G) Follow the emergency eyewash and shower facilities requirements of OAR 437-002-0161, Medical & First Aid.

(9) Before cleaning a dip tank:

(a) Drain the tank and open the cleanout doors; and

(b) Ventilate and clear any pockets where hazardous vapors may have accumulated.

(10)Use of flammable or combustible liquids.

(a) Use only dip tanks constructed from non-combustible materials. When drainboards are used, use only drainboards constructed from non-combustible materials.

(b) Overflow piping.

(A) Provide properly trapped overflow piping for dip tanks that have a capacity greater than 150 gallons (568 liters) or a surface area greater than 10 square feet (0.95 square meters).

(B) Overflow piping must discharge to a safe location.

(C) Overflow piping must be at least 3 inches (7.6 cm) diameter and must have sufficient capacity to prevent the tank from overflowing.

(D) The bottom of the overflow connector must be at least 6 inches (15.2 cm) below the top of the dip tank.

(c) Bottom Drains.

(A) Dip tanks containing more than 500 gallons (1893 L) of liquid must have a bottom drain.

(i) A bottom drain is not required if an automatic cover that meets the requirements of paragraph (10)(d)(C) is used.

(ii) A bottom drain is not required if the viscosity of the liquid at normal atmospheric temperature makes this impractical.

(B) Ensure the bottom drain will empty the dip tank in the event of a fire.

(C) Properly trap the bottom drain.

(D) Ensure the bottom drain has pipes that will empty the dip tank within 5 minutes.

(E) Bottom drains must discharge to a safe location.

(F) Bottom drains must be capable of manual and automatic operation. Manual operation must be from a safe and accessible location.

(G) When gravity flow from the bottom drain is impractical, use automatic pumps.

(d) Fire Protection.

(A) Provide portable fire extinguishers that meet the requirements of OAR 437-002-0187 in every vapor area.

(B) Provide an automatic fire extinguishing system:

(i) When the capacity of the dip tank is at least 150 gallons (568 L) or the liquid surface area is 4 square feet (0.38 square meters) or more; or

(ii) When the capacity of a hardening or tempering tank is at least 500 gallons (1893 L) or a liquid surface area of 25 square feet (2.37 square meters) or more.

(C) A cover that is closed by an approved automatic device for the automatic fire-extinguishing system may be used instead of the fire extinguishing system if the cover:

(i) Can also be activated manually;

(ii) Is noncombustible or tin-clad, with the enclosing metal applied with locked joints; and

(iii) Is kept closed when the dip tank is not in use.

(D) In each vapor area and any adjacent area, ensure that:

(i) All electrical wiring and equipment conform to OAR 437, Division 2, Subdivision S (except as specifically permitted in paragraph (15)); and

(ii) There are no flames, spark-producing devices, or other surfaces that are hot enough to ignite vapors.

(E) Electrically bond and ground portable containers used to add liquids to dip tanks to prevent static electrical sparks or arcs.

(F) All vapor areas must be free of combustible debris and as free as practicable of combustible stock.

(G) Deposit all rags or waste impregnated with dipping or coating material in a tightly-closing metal waste can immediately after use. Use only waste cans that are approved or acceptable to the local fire authority.

(H) Empty all waste containers at the end of each shift.

(I) Prohibit smoking in all vapor areas. Post a readily visible “No Smoking” sign near each dip tank or designate the entire area as “No Smoking.”

(e) If a conveyor system is used with a dip tank, it must automatically shut down in the event of a fire. If a ventilation system is used to meet the ventilation requirements of paragraph (4), the conveyor system must automatically shut down if the ventilation system fails.

(f) If a liquid is heated in a dip tank, it must be maintained below the liquid’s boiling point, and it must be maintained at least 100¼ F (37.8¼ C) below the liquid’s autoignition temperature.

(g) Ensure that a heating system that is used in a drying operation and could cause ignition:

(A) Is installed in accordance with NFPA 86A-1969, Standard for Ovens and Furnaces (which is incorporated by reference in 1910.6 of this part); and

(B) Has adequate mechanical ventilation that operates before and during the drying operation; and

(C) Shuts down automatically if any ventilating fan fails to maintain adequate ventilation.

(11) Hardening or Tempering Tanks.

(a) Ensure that hardening or tempering tanks:

(A) Are located as far as practicable from furnaces;

(B) Are on noncombustible flooring;

(C) Have noncombustible hoods and vents (or equivalent devices) for venting to the outside. For this purpose, treat vent ducts as flues and keep them away from combustible materials, particularly roofs.

(b) Equip each tank with an alarm that will sound if the temperature of the liquid comes within 50¼ F (10¼ C) of its flashpoint (the alarm set point).

(c) When practicable, provide each tank with a limit switch to shut down the conveyor supplying work to the tank.

(d) If the temperature of the liquid can exceed the alarm set point, equip the tank with a circulating cooling system.

(e) If the tank has a bottom drain, the bottom drain may be combined with the oil-circulating system.

(f) Do not use air under pressure when filling the dip tank or agitating the liquid in the dip tank.

(12) Flow Coating.

(a) Use a direct low-pressure pumping system or a 10-gallon (38 L) or smaller gravity tank to supply the paint for flow coating. In case of fire, an approved heat-actuated device must shut down the pumping system.

(b) Ensure that the piping is substantial and rigidly supported.

(13) When roll coating, roll spreading, or roll impregnating operations use a flammable or combustible liquid that has a flashpoint below 140¼ F (60¼ C), prevent sparking of static electricity by:

(a) Bonding and grounding all metallic parts (including rotating parts) and installing static collectors; or

(b) Maintaining a conductive atmosphere (for example, one with a high relative humidity) in the vapor area.

(14) Vapor degreasing tanks.

(a) Ensure that the condenser or vapor-level thermostat keeps the vapor level at least 36 inches (91 cm) or one-half the tank width, whichever is less, below the top of the vapor degreasing tank.

(b) When using gas as a fuel to heat the tank liquid, the combustion chamber must be airtight (except for the flue opening) to prevent solvent vapors from entering the air-fuel mixture.

(c) The flue must be made of corrosion-resistant material, and it must extend to the outside. Install a draft diverter if mechanical exhaust is used on the flue.

(d) Do not allow the temperature of the heating element to cause a solvent or mixture to decompose or to generate an excessive amount of vapor.

(15) Ensure that cyanide tanks have a dike or other safeguard to prevent cyanide from mixing with an acid if a dip tank fails.

(16) If a liquid is sprayed in the air over an open-surface cleaning or degreasing tank, control the spraying to the extent feasible by:

(a) Enclosing the spraying operation; and

(b) Using mechanical ventilation to provide enough inward air velocity to prevent the spray from leaving the vapor area.

(17) Electrostatic paint detearing.

(a) Use only approved electrostatic equipment in paint-detearing operations. Electrodes in such equipment must be substantial, rigidly supported, permanently located, and effectively insulated from ground by nonporous, noncombustible, clean, dry insulators.

(b) Use conveyors to support any goods being paint deteared.

(c) Do not manually handle goods being electrostatically deteared.

(d) Maintain a minimum distance of twice the sparking distance between goods being electro- statically deteared and the electrodes or conductors of the electrostatic equipment. This minimum distance must be displayed conspicuously on a sign located near the equipment.

(e) Ensure that the electrostatic equipment has automatic controls that immediately disconnect the power supply to the high-voltage transformer and signal the operator if:

(A) Ventilation or the conveyors fail to operate;

(B) A ground (or imminent ground) occurs anywhere in the high-voltage system; or

(C) Goods being electrostatically deteared come within twice the sparking distance of the electrodes or conductors of the equipment.

(f) Use fences, rails, or guards, made of conducting material and adequately grounded, to separate paint-detearing operations from storage areas and from personnel.

(g) To protect paint-detearing operations from fire, use automatic sprinklers or an automatic fire-extinguishing system conforming to the requirements of OAR 437, Division 2, Subdivision F.

(h) To collect paint deposits, provide drip plates and screens and clean these plates and screens in a safe location.

Stat. Authority: ORS 654.025(2), 656.726(4).
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295.
Hist.: OSHA 9-2007, f. & cert. ef. 12-3-07; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0280

Adoption by Reference

In addition to, and not in lieu of, any other safety and health codes contained in OAR Chapter 437, the Department adopts by reference the following federal regulations printed as part of the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910, in the Federal Register:

(1) 29 CFR 1910.251 Definitions, published 12/14/07, FR vol. 72, no. 240, p. 71061.

(2) 29 CFR 1910.252 General Requirements, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(3) 29 CFR 1910.253 Oxygen-Fuel Gas Welding and Cutting, published 12/14/07, FR vol. 72, no. 240, p. 71061.

(4) 29 CFR 1910.254 Arc Welding and Cutting, published 9/13/05, FR vol. 70, no. 176, p. 53925.

(5) 29 CFR 1910.255 Resistance Welding, published 4/11/90, Federal Register, vol. 55, no. 70, pp. 13710-13711.

These rules are on file with the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, Department of Consumer and Business Services, and the United States Government Printing Office.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 232-1990, f. 9-28-90, cert. ef. 12-1-90; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 3-1998, f. & cert. ef. 7-7-98; OSHA 4-2005, f. & cert. ef 12-14-05; OSHA 7-2008, f. & cert. ef. 5-30-08; OSHA 2-2010, f. & cert. ef. 2-25-10; OSHA 1-2012, f. & cert .ef. 4-10-12; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0288

Health Protection and Ventilation — General

(1) When welding or cutting operations are being performed on the following materials (Table OR Q 1), the protective measures indicated are required unless atmospheric samples taken in the welder’s breathing zone indicate that the concentration does not exceed the limits specified in Division 2/Z, OAR 437-002-0382, Oregon Rules for Air Contaminants.

(2) Nearby workers shall be afforded equivalent, effective, protection from these dangerous fumes. Table.

[ED. NOTE: Tables referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 232-1990, f. 9-28-90, cert. ef. 12-1-90; OSHA 6-1994, f. & cert. ef. 9-30-94; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0360

Adoption by Reference

In addition to, and not in lieu of, any other safety and health codes contained in OAR Chapter 437, the Department adopts by reference the following federal regulations printed as part of the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910, in the Federal Register:

(1) (Reserved) 29 CFR 1910.1000 Air contaminants. NOTE: 29 CFR 1910.1000 was repealed on 11/15/93 by OR OSHA. In Oregon, OAR 437-002-0382 applies.

(2) 29 CFR 1910.1001 Asbestos, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(3) 29 CFR 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles, interpretation of term, published 1/21/83, Federal Register, vol. 43, p. 2768.

(4) 29 CFR 1910.1003 13 Carcinogens, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(5) 29 CFR 1910.1004 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(6) Reserved for 29 CFR 1910.1005.

(7) 29 CFR 1910.1006 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(8) 29 CFR 1910.1007 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(9) 29 CFR 1910.1008 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(10) 29 CFR 1910.1009 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(11) 29 CFR 1910.1010 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(12) 29 CFR 1910.1011 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(13) 29 CFR 1910.1012 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(14) 29 CFR 1910.1013 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(15) 29 CFR 1910.1014 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(16) 29 CFR 1910.1015 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(17) 29 CFR 1910.1016 See §1910.1003, 13 Carcinogens.

(18) 29 CFR 1910.1017 Vinyl chloride, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(19) 29 CFR 1910.1018 Inorganic arsenic, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(20) 29 CFR 1910.1020 Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records, published 6/8/11, Federal Register, vol. 76, no. 110, p. 33590.

Appendix A Sample Authorization Letter.

Appendix B Availability of NIOSH RTECS.

(21) 29 CFR 1910.1025 Lead, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(22) 29 CFR 1910.1026 Chromium (VI), published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(23) 29 CFR 1910.1027 Cadmium, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(24) 29 CFR 1910.1028 Benzene, and Appendices A, B, C, D, and E, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(25) 29 CFR 1910.1029 Coke oven emissions, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(26) 29 CFR 1910.1030 Bloodborne pathogens, published 6/8/11, Federal Register, vol. 76, no. 110. P. 33590.

(27) 29 CFR 1910.1043 Cotton dust, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(28) 29 CFR 1910.1044 1,2 dibromo-3 chloropropane, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(29) 29 CFR 1910.1045 Acrylonitrile, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(30) 29 CFR 1910.1047 Ethylene oxide, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(31) 29 CFR 1910.1048 Formaldehyde, and Appendices A, B, C, D and E, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(32) 29 CFR 1910.1050 Methylenedianiline (MDA), published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(33) 29 CFR 1910.1051 1,3-Butadiene, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(34) 29 CFR 1910.1052 Methylene Chloride, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(NOTE: 29 CFR 1910.1101 Asbestos, was repealed by Federal Register, vol. 57, no. 110, issued 6/8/92, p. 24330.)

(35) 29 CFR 1910.1096 Ionizing radiation, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 31427.

(36) 29 CFR 1910.1200 Hazard communication, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(37) 29 CFR 1910.1201 Retention of DOT Markings, Placards and Labels, published 7/19/94, Federal Register, vol. 59, p. 36700.

(38) 29 CFR 1910.1450 Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(39) 29 CFR 1910.1499 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9245.

(40) 29 CFR 1910.1500 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9245.

These standards are available at the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, and the United States Government Printing Office.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: APD 13-1988, f. 8-2-88 & ef. 8-2-88; APD 14-1988, f. & ef. 9-12-88; APD 18-1988, f. & ef. 11-17-88; APD 4-1989(Temp), f. 3-31-89, ef. 5-1-89; APD 6-1989(Temp), f. 4-20-89, ef. 5-1-89; APD 9-1989, f. & ef. 7-7-89; APD 11-1989, f. 7-14-89, ef. 8-14-89; APD 13-1989, f. & ef. 7-17-89; OSHA 1-1990(Temp), f. & ef. 1-11-90; OSHA 3-1990(Temp), f. & ef. 1-19-90; OSHA 6-1990, f. & ef. 3-2-90; OSHA 7-1990, f. & ef. 3-2-90; OSHA 9-1990, f. 5-8-90, ef. 8-8-90; OSHA 11-1990, f. 6-7-90, ef. 7-1-90; OSHA 13-1990(Temp), f. 6-28-90, ef. 8-1-90; OSHA 14-1990, f. 6-28-90, ef. 8-1-90; OSHA 19-1990, f. & ef. 8-31-90; OSHA 20-1990, f. & ef. 9-18-90; OSHA 21-1990, f. & ef. 9-18-90; OSHA 7-1991, f. & cert. ef. 4-25-91; OSHA 13-1991, f. & cert. ef. 10-10-91; OSHA 15-1991, f. & cert. ef. 12-13-91; OSHA 1-1992, f. & cert. ef. 1-22-92; OSHA 4-1992, f. & cert. ef. 4-16-92; OSHA 5-1992, f. 4-24-92, cert. ef. 7-1-92; OSHA 6-1992, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-92; OSHA 9-1992(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 9-24-92; OSHA 11-1992, f. & cert. ef. 10-9-92; OSHA 12-1992, f. & cert. ef. 10-13-92; OSHA 14-1992, f. & cert. ef. 12-7-92; OSHA 15-1992, f. & cert. ef. 12-30-92; OSHA 1-1993, f. & cert. ef. 1-22-93; OSHA 6-1993(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 5-17-93; OSHA 12-1993, f. 8-20-93, cert. ef. 11-1-93; OSHA 17-1993, f. & cert. ef. 11-15-93; OSHA 4-1994, f. & cert. ef. 8-4-94; OSHA 1-1995, f. & cert. ef. 1-19-95; OSHA 4-1995, f. & cert. ef. 3-29-95; OSHA 5-1995, f. & cert. ef. 4-6-95; OSHA 8-1995, f. & cert. ef. 8-25-95; OSHA 4-1996, f. & cert. ef. 9-13-96; OSHA 6-1996, f. & cert. ef. 11-29-96; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 6-1997, f. & cert. ef. 5-2-97; OSHA 8-1997, f. & cert. ef. 11-14-97; OSHA 1-1998, f. & cert. ef. 2-13-98; OSHA 3-1998, f. & cert. ef. 7-7-98; OSHA 1-1999, f. & cert. ef. 3-22-99; OSHA 2-1999, f. & cert. ef. 4-30-99; OSHA 6-2001, f. & cert. ef. 5-15-01; OSHA 10-2001, f. 9-14-01, cert. ef. 10-18-01; OSHA 12-2001, f. & cert. ef. 10-26-01; OSHA 1-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-12-05; OSHA 4-2006, f. & cert. ef. 7-24-06; OSHA 6-2006, f. & cert. ef. 8-30-06; OSHA 10-2006, f. & cert. ef. 11-30-06; OSHA 5-2009, f. & cert. ef. 5-29-09; OSHA 3-2010, f. 6-10-10, cert. ef. 6-15-10; OSHA 4-2011, f. & cert. ef. 12-8-11; OSHA 5-2011, f. 12-8-11, cert. ef. 7-1-12; OSHA 1-2012, f. & cert .ef. 4-10-12; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0364

Oregon Rules for MOCA (4,4’-Methylene Bis (2-chloro?aniline))

(1) Application. This rule applies to any areas in which MOCA (4,4’-Methylene bis (2-chloroaniline)) (CAS# 101-14-4) is manufactured, processed, repackaged, released, handled, or stored, but shall not apply to transhipment in sealed containers, except for the labeling requirements under OAR 437-002-0364(5)(b), (c), and (d).

(2) Definitions:

“Absolute filter” is one capable of retaining 99.97 percent of a monodisperse aerosol of 0.3 μm particles.

“Administrator” means the Administrator of the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, or any person directed to act for the Administrator.

“Authorized employee” means an employee whose duties require them to be in the regulated area and who has been specifically assigned by the employer.

“Clean change room” means a room where employees put on clean clothing and/or protective equipment in an environment free of MOCA. The clean change room shall be contiguous to and have an entry from a shower room, when the shower room facilities are otherwise required in this rule.

“Closed system” means an operation involving MOCA where containment prevents the release of MOCA into regulated areas, non-regulated areas, or the external environment.

“Decontamination” means the inactivation of MOCA or its safe disposal.

“Disposal” means the safe removal of MOCA from the work environment.

“Emergency” means an unforeseen circumstance or set of circumstances resulting in the release of MOCA which may result in exposure to or contact with MOCA.

“External environment” means any environment external to regulated and non-regulated areas.

“Isolated system” means a fully enclosed structure other than the vessel of containment of MOCA which is impervious to the passage of MOCA and which would prevent the entry of MOCA into regulated areas, non-regulated areas, or the external environment, should leakage or spillage from the vessel of containment occur.

“Laboratory type hood” is a device enclosed on three sides and the top and bottom, designed and maintained so as to draw air inward at an average linear face velocity of 150 feet per minute with a minimum of 125 feet per minute; designed, constructed, and maintained in such a way that an operation involving MOCA within the hood does not require the insertion of any portion of any employee's body other than their hands and arms.

“Non-regulated area” means any area under the control of the employer where entry and exit is neither restricted nor controlled.

“Open-vessel system” means an operation involving MOCA in an open vessel, which is not in an isolated system, a laboratory type hood, nor in any other system affording equivalent protection against the entry of MOCA into regulated areas, non-regulated areas, or the external environment.

“Protective clothing” means clothing designed to protect an employee against contact with or exposure to MOCA.

“Regulated area” means an area where entry and exit is restricted and controlled.

(3) Requirements for areas containing MOCA.

(a) A regulated area shall be established by an employer where MOCA is manufactured, processed, used, repackaged, released, handled or stored. All such areas shall be controlled in accordance with the requirements for the following category or categories describing the operation involved:

(A) Isolated systems. Employees working with MOCA within an isolated system, such as a “glove box” shall wash their hands and arms upon completion of the assigned task and before engaging in other activities not associated with the isolated system.

(B) Closed system operation. Within regulated areas where MOCA is stored in sealed containers, or contained in a closed system, including piping systems, with any sample ports or openings closed while MOCA is contained within:

(i) Access shall be restricted to authorized employees only; and

(ii) Employees shall be required to wash hands, forearms, face and neck upon each exit from the regulated areas, close to the point of exit and before engaging in other activities.

(C) Open vessel system operations. Open vessel system operations as defined in OAR 437-002-0364(2) are prohibited.

(D) Transfer from a closed system, charging or discharging point operations, or otherwise opening a closed system. In operations involving “laboratory type hoods,” or in locations where MOCA is contained in an otherwise “closed system,” but is transferred, charged, or discharged into other normally closed containers, the provisions of this rule shall apply.

(i) Access shall be restricted to authorized employees only.

(ii) Each operation shall be provided with continuous local exhaust ventilation so that air movement is always from ordinary work areas to the operation. Exhaust air shall not be discharged to regulated areas, non-regulated areas or the external environment unless decontaminated. Clean make-up air shall be introduced in sufficient volume to maintain the correct operation of the local exhaust system.

(iii) Employees shall be provided with, and required to wear, clean, full body protective clothing (smocks, coveralls, or long-sleeved shirt and pants), shoe covers and gloves prior to entering the regulated area.

(iv) Employees engaged in MOCA handling operations must be provided and required to wear and use respiratory protection, in accordance with OAR 437, Division 2/I, Personal Protective Equipment, 1910.134, Respiratory Protection.

(v) Prior to each exit from a regulated area, employees shall be required to remove and leave protective clothing and equipment at the point of exit and at the last exit of the day, to place used clothing and equipment in impervious containers at the point of exit for purposes of decontamination or disposal. The contents of such impervious containers shall be identified, as required under OAR 437-002-0364(5)(b), (c) and (d).

(vi) Employees shall be required to wash hands, forearms, face and neck on each exit from the regulated area, close to the point of exit, and before engaging in other activities.

(vii) Employees shall be required to shower after the last exit of the day.

(viii) Drinking fountains are prohibited in the regulated area.

(E) Maintenance and decontamination activities. In cleanup of leaks or spills, maintenance or repair operations on contaminated systems or equipment, or any operations involving work in an area where direct contact with MOCA could result, each authorized employee entering that area shall:

(i) Be provided with and required to wear clean, impervious garments, including gloves, boots and continuous-air supplied hood in accordance with OAR 437, Division 2/I, Personal Protective Equipment;

(ii) Be decontaminated before removing the protective garments and hood; and

(iii) Be required to shower upon removing the protective garments and hood.

(F) Premixed solutions. Where MOCA is present only in a single solution at a temperature not exceeding 220° F, the establishment of a regulated area is not required; however:

(i) Only authorized employees shall be permitted to handle such materials;

(ii) Each day employees shall be provided with and required to wear a clean change of protective clothing (smocks, coveralls, or long-sleeved shirts and pants), gloves, and other protective garments and equipment necessary to prevent contact with the solution in the process used;

(iii) Employees shall be required to remove and leave protective clothing and equipment when leaving the work area at the end of the work day, or at any time solution is spilled on such clothing or equipment. Used clothing and equipment shall be placed in impervious containers for purposes of decontamination or disposal. The contents of such impervious containers shall be identified, as required under OAR 437-002-0364(5)(b), (c) and (d).

(iv) Employees shall be required to wash hands and face after removing such clothing and equipment and before engaging in other activities;

(v) Employees assigned to work covered by OAR 437-002-0364(3)(a)(F) shall be deemed to be working in regulated areas for the purposes of OAR 437-002-0364(4)(a); (b)(A), (B); (c)(C), (D), and 437-002-0364(5) through (7).

(vi) Work areas where solution may be spilled shall be:

(I) Covered daily or after any spill with a clean covering; or

(II) Cleaned thoroughly daily and after any spill.

(4) General Regulated Area Requirements:

(a) Emergencies. In an emergency, immediate measures including, but not limited to, the requirements of sections (A), (B), (C), (D), and (E) below shall be implemented:

(A) The potentially affected area shall be evacuated as soon as the emergency has been determined.

(B) Hazardous conditions created by the emergency shall be eliminated and the potentially affected area shall be decontaminated prior to the resumption of normal operations.

(C) Special medical surveillance by a physician shall be instituted within 24 hours, for employees present in the potentially affected area at the time of the emergency. A report of the medical surveillance and any treatment shall be included in the incident report, in accordance with OAR 437-002-0364(6)(b).

(D) Where an employee has a known contact with MOCA, such employee shall be required to shower as soon as possible, unless contraindicated by physical injuries.

(E) An incident report on the emergency shall be reported as provided in OAR 437-002-0364(6)(b).

(F) Emergency deluge showers and eyewash fountains supplied with running potable water shall be located near, within sight of, and on the same level with locations where a direct exposure to MOCA would be most likely as a result of equipment failure, or improper work practice.

(b) Hygiene Facilities and Practices.

(A) Storage or consumption of food, storage or use of containers of beverages, storage or application of cosmetics, smoking, storage of smoking materials, tobacco products or other products for chewing, or the chewing of such products, are prohibited in regulated areas.

(B) Where employees are required by OAR 437-002-0364 to wash, washing facilities shall be provided in accordance with OAR 437, Division 2/J, 1910.141, Sanitation.

(C) Where employees are required by OAR 437-002-0364 to shower, shower facilities shall be provided in accordance with OAR 437, Division 2/J, 1910.141 Sanitation.

(D) Where employees wear protective clothing and equipment clean change rooms shall be provided in accordance with OAR 437, Division 2/J, 1910.141, Sanitation, for the number of such employees required to change clothes.

(E) Where toilets are in regulated areas, such toilets shall be in a separate room.

(c) Contamination Control.

(A) Regulated areas, except for outdoor systems, shall be maintained under pressure negative with respect to non-regulated areas. Local exhaust ventilation may be used to satisfy this requirement. Clean make-up air in equal volume shall replace air removed.

(B) Any equipment, materials, or other item taken into or removed from a regulated area shall be done so in a manner that does not cause contamination in non-regulated areas or the external environment.

(C) Decontamination procedures shall be established and implemented to remove MOCA from the surfaces of materials, equipment, and the decontamination facility.

(D) Dry sweeping and dry mopping is prohibited.

(5) Signs, Information and Training.

(a) Signs.

(A) Entrances to regulated areas shall be posted with signs bearing the legend:

DANGER

MOCA

(4,4’-METHYLENE BIS (2-CHLOROANILINE))

MAY CAUSE CANCER

AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL ONLY

(B) Entrances to regulated areas containing operations covered in OAR 437-002-0364 (3)(a)(E), shall be posted with signs bearing the legend:

DANGER

MOCA

(4,4’-METHYLENE BIS (2-CHLOROANILINE))

MAY CAUSE CANCER

WEAR RESPIRATORY PROTECTION AND

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING IN THIS AREA

AUTHORIZED PERSONNEL ONLY

(C) Appropriate signs and instructions shall be posted at the entrance to, and exit from, regulated areas, informing employees of the procedures that must be followed in entering and leaving a regulated area.

(b) Container Contents Identification.

(A) Provide impervious containers as required under OAR 437-002-0364(3)(a)(D)(v).

(i) Ensure only authorized employees have access to and handle containers.

(ii) Containers must display the following warning:

DANGER

CONTENTS CONTAMINATED with MOCA

(4,4’-METHYLENE BIS (2-CHLOROANILINE))

MAY CAUSE CANCER

(B) Label all primary and secondary containers of MOCA in accordance with 1910.1200.

(c) Lettering.

(A) Lettering on signs and instructions required by OAR 437-002-0364(5)(a) shall be a minimum letter height of 2 inches.

(B) Labels on containers required under OAR 437-002-0364(5)(b)(A)(ii) shall not be less than 1/2 the size of the largest lettering on the package, and not less than 8 point type in any instance; provided that no such required lettering need be more than 1 inch in height.

(d) Prohibited Statements. No statement shall appear on or near any required sign, label, or instruction which contradicts or detracts from the effect of any required warning, information or instruction.

(e) Training and Indoctrination.

(A) Each employee prior to being authorized to enter a regulated area, shall receive a training and indoctrination program including, but not necessarily limited to:

(i) The nature of the carcinogenic hazards of MOCA including local and systemic toxicity;

(ii) The specific nature of the operation involving MOCA which could result in exposure;

(iii) The purpose for and application of the medical surveillance program, including, as appropriate, methods of self-examination;

(iv) The purpose for and application of decontamination practices and purposes;

(v) The purpose for and significance of emergency practices and procedures;

(vi) The employee’s specific role in emergency procedures;

(vii) Specific information to aid the employee in recognition and evaluation of conditions and situations which may result in the release of MOCA;

(viii) The purpose for and application of specific first aid procedures and practices; and

(ix) A review of OAR 437-002-0364 at the employee’s first training and indoctrination program and annually thereafter.

(B) Specific emergency procedures shall be prescribed, and posted, and employees shall be familiarized with their terms, and rehearsed in their application.

(C) All materials relating to the program shall be provided upon request to authorized representatives of the Administrator.

(6) Reports.

(a) Reserved.

(b) Incidents. Incidents which result in the release of MOCA into any area where employees may be potentially exposed shall be reported in accordance with this rule.

(A) A report of the occurrence of the incident and the facts obtainable at that time, including a report of any medical treatment of affected employees, shall be made within 24 hours to the Administrator.

(B) A written report shall be filed with the Administrator within 15 calendar days thereafter, and shall include:

(i) A description of the area involved, and the extent of known and possible employee exposure and area contamination; and

(ii) A report of any medical treatment of affected employees, and any medical surveillance program implemented; and

(iii) An analysis of the circumstances of the incident, and measures taken or to be taken, with specific completion dates, to avoid further similar releases.

(7) Medical Surveillance. At no cost to the employee, a program of medical surveillance shall be established and implemented for employees considered for assignment to enter regulated areas, and for authorized employees.

(a) Examinations:

(A) Before an employee is assigned to enter a regulated area, a pre-assignment physical examination by a physician shall be provided. The examination shall include the personal history of the employee, family and occupational background, including genetic and environmental factors.

(B) Authorized employees shall be provided periodic physical examinations, not less often than annually, following the pre-assignment examination.

(C) In all physical examinations, the examining physician shall consider whether there exist conditions of increased risk, including reduced immunological competence, those undergoing treatment with steroids or cytotoxic agents, pregnancy and cigarette smoking.

(b) Records:

(A) Employers of employees examined pursuant to this rule shall cause to be maintained complete and accurate records of all such medical examinations. Records shall be maintained for the duration of the employee’s employment. The employer shall comply with the requirements concerning transfer of records set forth in Division 2/Z, 1910.1020(h).

(B) Records required by this rule shall be provided upon request to employees, designated representatives, and the Administrator in accordance with OAR 437, Division 2/Z, 1910.1020, Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records.

(C) Any physician who conducts a medical examination required by this rule shall furnish to the employer a statement of the employee’s suitability for employment in the specific exposure.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: WCB 3-1975, f. 10-6-75, ef. 11-1-75; WCB 4-1979, f. 5-21-79, ef. 7-15-79; WCB 8-1980, f. 11-5-80, ef. 12-1-80; OSHA 12-1993, f. 8-20-93, cert. ef. 11-1-93; OSHA 4-2011, f. & cert. ef. 12-8-11; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0377

Additional Oregon Rules for Hazard Commu?nication

(1) In addition to the provisions of 1910.1200(i)(11), the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division shall have the authority under ORS Chapter 654 to issue a subpoena or any protective orders.

(2) Agency actions under ORS Chapter 654 and these rules may be enforced by the issuance of additional citations and penalties pursuant to ORS 654.071(4), ORS 654.086(1)(d), or ORS 654.086(3). The Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division may refer the matter to the Circuit Court in the county in which the proceedings are pending for enforcement of the subpoena.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: WCB 6-1984, f. 6-25-84, ef. 11-25-85; APD 1-1988, f. & ef. 2-8-88; OSHA 12-1993, f. 8-20-93, cert.; ef. 11-1-93; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0378

Oregon Rules for Pipe Labelling

(1) Scope and Application. This division shall apply to all piping systems containing hazardous substances or that use asbestos as a pipe insulation material in buildings, structures and workplaces. This division does not apply to buried piping.

(2) Definitions.

Hazardous substances: any substance which is a physical or health hazard.

Health Hazard: A chemical which is classified as posing one of the following hazardous effects: acute toxicity (any route of exposure); skin corrosion or irritation; serious eye damage or eye irritation; respiratory or skin sensitization; germ cell mutagenicity; carcinogenicity; reproductive toxicity; specific target organ toxicity (single or repeated exposure); or aspiration hazard. The criteria for determining whether a chemical is classified as a health hazard are detailed in Appendix A to 1910.1200 - Health Hazard Criteria.

Physical Hazard: A chemical that is classified as posing one of the following hazardous effects: explosive; flammable (gases, aerosols, liquids, or solids); oxidizer (liquid, solid or gas); self-reactive; pyrophoric (liquid or solid); self-heating; organic peroxide; corrosive to metal; gas under pressure; or in contact with water emits flammable gas. See Appendix B to 1910.1200 – Physical Hazard Criteria.

Piping system: includes pipes, single or multiple, of any kind and, in addition, valves and pipe coverings.

Pipes: conduits for the transport of gases, liquids, semiliquids or fine particulate dusts.

(3) Purpose. The purpose of this division is to prescribe minimum labelling requirements for all piping systems which contain hazardous substances, transport substances in a hazardous state, or which use asbestos as a pipe insulation material.

(4) Labelling.

(a) Pipes and piping systems which contain hazardous substances or transport substances in a hazardous state shall be labelled in accordance with subsections (A), (B), (C) and (D) or other- wise identified in accordance with subsection (c) of this rule:

(A) Positive identification of the hazardous contents of a piping system shall be by lettered labels. The label shall give the name of the contents in full or abbreviated form.

(B) Contents shall be identified by labelling with sufficient detail to identify the hazard.

(C) Label wording shall be brief, informative and simple.

(D) Labelling shall be accomplished by stencilling, the use of tape, adhesives, markers or approved alternative means.

(b) Pipes or piping systems which use asbestos as a pipe insulation material shall be labelled in accordance with subsection (b)(A), or otherwise identified in accordance with subsection (c) below:

(A) The label for pipe insulation containing asbestos shall include the following:

DANGER

CONTAINS ASBESTOS FIBERS

MAY CAUSE CANCER

CAUSES DAMAGE TO LUNGS

DO NOT BREATHE DUST

AVOID CREATING DUST

(c) The employer may use signs, placards, process sheets, batch tickets, operating procedures, or other such written materials in lieu of affixing labels to individual pipes, as long as the alternative method identifies the pipe(s) to which it is applicable and conveys the information required by this rule. The written materials shall be readily accessible to the employees in their work areas during each shift. (OAR 437, Division 2/Z, Hazard Communication, 1910.1200.)

(5) Location of Labelling.

(a) Labelling shall be applied where confusion may occur, such as close to valves or flanges and adjacent to changes in direction, branches and where pipes pass through walls, floors or ceilings.

(b) Labelling shall be applied, at a minimum, at the beginning and end of continuous pipe runs.

(c) For asbestos insulation, labelling shall be at a minimum, on unobstructed continuous pipe runs, every 75 feet. Illustration.

(6) Visibility.

(a) Where pipes are located above or below the normal line of vision, the lettering shall be placed below or above the horizontal centerline of the pipe.

(b) Where pipes are inaccessible and/or at a distance which precludes clear identification of the letters on labelling, alternatives to the labelling which meet all other requirements of this rule may be used (i.e., schematics posted on walls in work areas). Appendix.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: WCD 8-1986, f. 9-4-86, cert. ef. 10-1-87; OSHA 12-1993, f. 6-20-93, cert. ef. 11-1-93, Renumbered from 437-153-0004-0025; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-002-0391

Additional Oregon Rules for Carcinogens in Laboratories

(1) Definitions.

“Absolute filter” is one capable of retaining 99.97 percent of a monodisperse aerosol of 0.3 μm particles.

For the purposes of OAR 437-002-0391, “carcinogen” is defined as the substances regulated by 29 CFR 1910.1003, 1910.1004, 1910.1006, 1910.1007, 1910.1008, 1910.1009, 1910.1010, 1910.1011, 1910.1012, 1910.1013, 1910.1014, 1910.1015, 1910.1016 and OAR 437-002-0364.

(2) Laboratory activities. The requirements of this section shall apply to research and quality control activities involving the use of a carcinogen.

(a) Mechanical pipetting aids shall be used for all pipetting procedures.

(b) Experiments, procedures and equipment which could produce aerosols shall be confined to laboratory-type hoods or glove boxes.

(c) Surfaces on which a carcinogen is handled shall be protected from contamination.

(d) Contaminated wastes and animal carcasses shall be collected in impervious containers which are closed and decontaminated prior to removal from the work area. Such wastes and carcasses shall be incinerated in such a manner that no carcinogenic products are released.

(e) All other forms of a carcinogen shall be inactivated prior to disposal.

(f) Laboratory vacuum systems shall be protected with disposable absolute filters. Exhaust systems containing such filters shall be provided with suitable ports or openings to enable determination of whether the filter in its operating location, does meet the efficiency requirements defined in OAR 437-002-0391(1). Determination of filter efficiency shall be by measurement, with a forward light scattering photometer, of passage of a polydisperse dioctyl phthalate aerosol.

(g) Employees engaged in animal support activities shall be:

(A) Provided with, and required to wear, a complete protective clothing change, clean each day, including coveralls or pants and shirt, foot covers, head covers, gloves, and appropriate respiratory protective equipment or devices; and

(B) Required to remove and leave protective clothing and equipment at the point of exit prior to each exit from a regulated area and at the last exit of the day, to place used clothing and equipment in impervious containers at the point of exit for purposes of decontamination or disposal. The contents of such impervious containers must display the following warning:

DANGER

CONTAMINATED

MAY CAUSE CANCER

(C) Required to wash hands, forearms, face and neck upon each exit from the regulated area close to the point of exit, and before engaging in other activities; and

(D) Required to shower after the last exit of the day.

(h) Employees, other than those engaged only in animal support activities, each day shall be:

(A) Provided with and required to wear a clean change of appropriate laboratory clothing, such as a solid front gown, surgical scrub suit, or full buttoned laboratory coat.

(B) Required to remove and leave protective clothing and equipment at the point of exit prior to each exit from a regulated area and at the last exit of the day, to place used clothing and equipment in impervious containers at the point of exit for purposes of decontamination or disposal. The contents of such impervious containers must display the following warning:

DANGER

CONTAMINATED

MAY CAUSE CANCER

(C) Required to wash hands, forearms, face and neck upon each exit from the regulated area close to the point of exit, and before engaging in other activities.

(i) Air pressure in laboratory areas and animal rooms where a carcinogen is handled and bio- assay studies are performed shall be negative in relation to the pressure in surrounding areas. Exhaust air shall not be discharged to regulated areas, non-regulated areas or the external environment unless decontaminated.

(j) There shall be no connection between regulated areas and any other areas through the ventilation system.

(k) A current inventory of carcinogens shall be maintained.

(l) Ventilated apparatus such as laboratory type hoods, shall be tested at least semi-annually or immediately after ventilation modification or maintenance operations, by personnel fully qualified to certify correct containment and operation.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: WCB 3-1975, f. 10-6-75, ef. 11-1-75; OSHA 12-1993, f. 6-20-93, cert. ef. 11-1-93; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-003-0001

Adoption by Reference

In addition to, and not in lieu of, any other safety and health codes contained in OAR Chapter 437, the Department adopts by reference the following federal regulations printed as part of the Code of Federal Regulations, in the Federal Register:

(1) Subdivision A – GENERAL

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1 Purpose and Scope, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.2 Variances from safety and health standards, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.3 Inspections – right of entry, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.4 Rules of practice for administrative adjudications for enforcement of safety and health standards, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.6 Incorporation by reference, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(2) Subdivision B – GENERAL INTERPRETATIONS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.10 Scope of subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.11 Coverage under section 103 of the act distinguished, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.12 Reorganization plan No. 14 of 1950, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.13 Interpretation of statutory terms, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.14 Federal contracts for ‘mixed’ types of performance, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.15 Relationship to the service contract act; Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.16 Rules of construction, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(3) Subdivision C – GENERAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROVISIONS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.20 General safety and health provisions, published 12/12/08, FR vol. 73, no. 240, pp. 75568-75589.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.21 Safety training and education, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.22 Recording and reporting of injuries (Reserved)

(d) 29 CFR 1926.23 First aid and medical attention, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.24 Fire protection and prevention, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.25 Housekeeping, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.26 Illumination, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.27 Sanitation, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.28 Personal protective equipment, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.29 Acceptable certifications, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.30 Shipbuilding and ship repairing, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9249.

(l) 29 CFR 1926.31 (Reserved).

(m) 29 CFR 1926.32 Definitions, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35078.

(n) 29 CFR 1926.33 Access to employee exposure and medical records, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 31427.

(o) 29 CFR 1926.34 Means of egress, published 6/30/93, Federal Register, vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35083.

(4) Subdivision D – OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.50 Medical services and first aid, published 12/27/11, FR vol. 76, no. 248, p. 80735.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.51 Sanitation, published 6/8/11, Federal Register, vol. 76, no. 110, p. 33590.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.52 Occupational noise exposure, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.53 Ionizing radiation, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.54 Nonionizing radiation, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.55 Gases, vapors, fumes, dusts, and mists, published 1/10/97, FR vol. 62, no. 7, p. 1619.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.56 Illumination, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.57 Ventilation, published 1/8/98, FR vol. 63, no. 5, p. 1295.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.58 Reserved, §1926.58, Asbestos, tremolite, anthophyllite and actinolite is redesignated as §1926.1101, Asbestos, and §1926.58 is reserved (8/10/94, FR vol. 59, no. 153, pp. 41131-62).

(j) 29 CFR 1926.59 Hazard Communication, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427; amended with Oregon OSHA Admin. Order 5-2012, f. 9/25/12, ef. 9/25/12.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.60 Methylenedianiline (MDA), published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(l) 29 CFR 1926.61 Retention of DOT markings, placards and labels, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(m) 29 CFR 1926.62 Lead, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

NOTE: Cadmium has been redesignated as §1926.1127.

(n) 29 CFR 1926.65 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response

NOTE: Division 2/H, 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, applies to Construction.

(5) Subdivision E – PERSONAL PROTECTIVE AND LIFE SAVING EQUIPMENT

(a) 29 CFR 1926.95 Criteria for personal protective equipment, published 11/15/07, FR vol. 72, no. 220, p. 64342.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.100 Head protection, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.101 Hearing protection, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.102 Eye and face protection, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35160.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.103 Respiratory protection, published 1/8/98, FR vol. 63, no. 5, p. 1297.

NOTE: 29 CFR 1926.104 Removed, 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40729.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.105 Reserved, 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40729.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.106 Working over or near water, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.107 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40729.

(6) Subdivision F – FIRE PROTECTION AND PREVENTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.150 Fire protection, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.151 Fire prevention, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, p. 25318.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.152 Flammable and combustible liquids, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.153 Liquefied petroleum gas (LP-Gas), published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35170.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.154 Temporary heating devices, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.155 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(7) Subdivision G – SIGNS, SIGNALS, AND BARRICADES

(a) 29 CFR 1926.200 Accident prevention signs and tags, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35173; amended with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 2-2003, f. 1/30/03, ef. 1/30/03.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.201 Signaling, REPEALED with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 2-2003, f. 1/30/03, ef. 1/30/03.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.202 Barricades, REPEALED with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 2-2003, f. 1/30/03, ef. 1/30/03.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.203 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940; amended with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 2-2003, f. 1/30/03, ef. 1/30/03.

(8) Subdivision H – MATERIALS HANDLING, STORAGE, USE AND DISPOSAL

(a) 29 CFR 1926.250 General requirements for storage, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35173.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.251 Rigging equipment for material handling, published 6/8/11, Federal Register, vol. 74, no. 110, p. 33590.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.252 Disposal of waste materials, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(9) Subdivision I – TOOLS – HAND AND POWER

(a) 29 CFR 1926.300 General requirements, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9250.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.301 Hand tools, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.302 Power operated hand tools, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35175.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.303 Abrasive wheels and tools, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35175.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.304 Woodworking tools, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9251.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.305 Jacks - lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic, published Federal Register vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35176.

(10) Subdivision J – WELDING AND CUTTING

(a) 29 CFR 1926.350 Gas welding and cutting, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35179.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.351 Arc welding and cutting, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, p. 25318.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.352 Fire prevention, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.353 Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting, and heating, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35179.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.354 Welding, cutting, and heating in way of preservative coatings, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(11) Subdivision K – ELECTRICAL

(a) 29 CFR 1926.400 Introduction, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.401 (Reserved)

(c) 29 CFR 1926.402 Applicability, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.403 General requirements, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.404 Wiring design and protection, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335; amended with AO 5-2002, repeal (b)(1), f. 6/28/02, ef. 10/1/03.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.405 Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.406 Specific purpose equipment and installations, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.407 Hazardous (classified) locations, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.408 Special systems, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.409 (Reserved)

(k) 29 CFR 1926.415 (Reserved)

(l) 29 CFR 1926.416 General requirements, published 8/12/96, FR vol. 61, no. 156, p. 41738.

(m) 29 CFR 1926.417 Lockout and tagging of circuits, published 8/12/96, FR vol. 61, no. 156, p. 41739.

(n) 29 CFR 1926.418 (Reserved)

(o) 29 CFR 1926.430 (Reserved)

(p) 29 CFR 1926.431 Maintenance of equipment, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(q) 29 CFR 1926.432 Environmental deterioration of equipment, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(r) 29 CFR 1926.433 - 29 CFR 1926.440 (Reserved)

(s) 29 CFR 1926.441 Battery locations and battery charging, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(t) 29 CFR 1926.442 - 29 CFR 1926.448 (Reserved)

(u) 29 CFR 1926.449 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(12) Subdivision L – SCAFFOLDING

(a) 29 CFR 1926.450 Scope, application and definitions applicable to this subpart, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.451 General requirements, published 11/25/96, FR vol. 61, no. 228, p. 59831.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.452 Additional requirements applicable to specific types of scaffolds, published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46113.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.453 Aerial lifts, published 11/25/96, FR vol. 61, no. 228, p. 59832.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.454 Training, published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46117.

(f) Appendix A to Subpart L Scaffold Specifications, published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46117.

(g) Appendix B to Subpart L Criteria for determining the feasibility of providing safe access and fall protection for scaffold erectors and dismantlers (Reserved), published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46122.

(h) Appendix C to Subpart L List of National Consensus Standards, published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46122.

(i) Appendix D to Subpart L List of training topics for scaffold erectors and dismantlers, published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46122.

(j) Appendix E to Subpart L Drawing and illustrations, published 11/25/96, FR vol. 61, no. 228, p. 59832.

(13) Subdivision M – FALL PROTECTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.500 Scope, application, and definitions applicable to this subpart, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.501 Duty to have fall protection, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40732-40733; amended with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.502 Fall protection systems criteria and practices, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40733-40738; amended with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.503 Training requirements. REPEALED with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02, replaced with OI.

(e) Appendix A to Subpart M Determining Roof Widths, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40738-40742.

(f) Appendix B to Subpart M Guardrail Systems, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40743.

(g) Appendix C to Subpart M Personal Fall Arrest Systems, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40743-40746.

(h) Appendix D to Subpart M Positioning Device Systems, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40746.

(14) Subdivision N – HELICOPTERS, HOISTS, ELEVATORS, AND CONVEYORS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.550 (Reserved).

(b) 29 CFR 1926.551 Helicopters, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.552 Material hoists, personnel hoists, and elevators, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.553 Base-mounted drum hoist, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.554 Overhead hoists, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.555 Conveyors, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(15) Subdivision O – MOTOR VEHICLES, MECHANIZED EQUIPMENT, AND MARINE OPERATIONS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.600 Equipment, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.601 Motor vehicles, REPEALED by OR-OSHA Admin. Order 6-2007, f. 9/26/07, ef. 9/26/07.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.602 Material handling equipment, published 12/1/98, FR vol. 63, no. 230, p. 66274; amended by AO 7-2003, f. 12/5/03, ef. 12/5/03.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.603 Pile driving equipment, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.604 Site clearing, published 7/22/77, FR vol. 42, p. 37674.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.605 Marine operations and equipment, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.606 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(16) Subdivision P – EXCAVATIONS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.650 Scope, application, and definitions applicable to this subdivision, published 10/31/89, FR vol. 54, no. 209, pp. 45959-45961.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.651 General requirements, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40730.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.652 Requirements for protective systems, published 10/31/89, FR vol. 54, no. 209, pp. 45961-45962.

(d) Appendices A-F to Subdivision P, Excavations, published 10/31/89, FR vol. 54, no. 209, pp. 45962-45991.

(17) Subdivision Q – CONCRETE AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.700 Scope, application and definitions applicable to this subpart, published 10/18/90, FR vol. 55, no. 202, p. 42326.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.701 General requirements, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40730.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.702 Requirements for equipment and tools, published 6/16/88, FR vol. 53, p. 22612.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.703 Requirements for cast-in-place concrete, published 6/16/88, FR vol. 53, p. 22612.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.704 Requirements for precast concrete, published 10/5/89, FR vol. 54, no. 192, p. 41088.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.705 Requirements for lift-slab construction operations, published 10/18/90, FR vol. 55, no. 202, p. 42326.

(g) Appendix A to 1926.705 Lift-slab operations, published 10/18/90, FR vol. 55, no. 202, p. 42326.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.706 Requirements for masonry construction, published 6/16/88, FR vol. 53, p. 22612; amended with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 1-2003, f. 1/30/03, ef. 4/30/03.

(18) Subdivision R – STEEL ERECTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.750 Scope, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.751 Definitions, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137; amended with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02; amended with AO 8-2003, f. 12/30/03, ef. 1/1/04.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.752 Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction sequence, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.753 Hoisting and rigging, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.754 Structural steel assembly, published 4/3/06, FR vol. 71, no. 63, p. 16669.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.755 Column anchorage, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.756 Beams and columns, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.757 Open web steel joists, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137; amended with AO 8-2003, f. 12/30/03, ef. 1/1/04.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.758 Systems-engineered metal buildings, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.759 Falling object protection, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.760 Fall protection, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137; amended with AO 8-2003, f. 12/30/03, ef. 1/1/04.

(l) 29 CFR 1926.761 Training, published 12/12/08, FR vol. 73, no. 240, pp. 75568-75589.

(m) Appendix A to Subpart R Guidelines for establishing the components of a site-specific erection plan: Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with §1926.752(e), published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(n) Appendix B to Subpart R Reserved.

(o) Appendix C to Subpart R Illustrations of bridging terminus points: Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with §1926.757(a)(10) and §1926.757(c)(5), published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(p) Appendix D to Subpart R Illustration of the use of control lines to demarcate controlled decking zones (CDZs): Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with §1926.760(c)(3), REPEALED with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02; amended with AO 8-2003, f. 12/30/03, ef. 1/1/04.

(q) Appendix E to Subpart R Training: Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with §1926.761, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(r) Appendix F to Subpart R Perimeter columns: Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with §1926.756(e) to Protect the Unprotected Side or Edge of a Walking/Working Surface, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(s) Appendix G to Subpart R Fall protection systems criteria and practices from §1926.502: Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with Complying with §1926.760(d), REPEALED with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02; amended with AO 8-2003, f. 12/30/03, ef. 1/1/04.

(t) Appendix H to Subpart R Double connections: Illustration of a clipped end connection and a staggered connection: Non-Mandatory Guidelines for Complying with Complying with §1926.756(c)(1), published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(19) Subdivision S – UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION, CAISSONS, COFFERDAMS, AND COMPRESSED AIR

(a) 29 CFR 1926.800 Tunnels and shafts, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp.47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.801 Caissons, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.802 Cofferdams, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.803 Compressed air, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, p. 25318.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.804 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) Appendix A to Subpart S Decompression Tables, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(20) Subdivision T – DEMOLITION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.850 Preparatory operations, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.851 Stairs, passageways, and ladders, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.852 Chutes, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.853 Removal of materials through floor openings, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.854 Removal of walls, masonry sections, and chimneys, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.855 Manual removal of floors, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.856 Removal of walls, floors, and materials with equipment, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.857 Storage, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.858 Removal of steel construction, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.859 Mechanical demolition, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.860 Selective demolition by explosives, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(21) Subdivision U – BLASTING AND USE OF EXPLOSIVES

(a) 29 CFR 1926.900 General provisions, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.901 Blaster qualifications, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.902 Surface transportation of explosives, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35311.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.903 Underground transportation of explosives, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.904 Storage of explosives and blasting agents, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35311.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.905 Loading of explosives or blasting agents, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35184.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.906 Initiation of explosive charges – electric blasting, published 6/18/98, FR vol. 63, no. 117, p. 33469.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.907 Use of safety fuse, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.908 Use of detonating cord, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.909 Firing the blast, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.910 Inspection after blasting, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(l) 29 CFR 1926.911 Misfires, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(m) 29 CFR 1926.912 Underwater blasting, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(n) 29 CFR 1926.913 Blasting in excavation work under compressed air, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(o) 29 CFR 1926.914 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35184, 35311.

(22) Subdivision V – POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.950 General requirements, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.951 Tools and protective equipment, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40730.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.952 Mechanical equipment, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.953 Material handling, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.954 Grounding for protection of employees, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.955 Overhead lines, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.956 Underground lines, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.957 Construction in energized substations, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.958 External load helicopters, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.959 Lineman’s body belts, safety straps, and lanyards, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.960 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(23) Subdivision W – ROLLOVER PROTECTIVE STRUCTURES: OVERHEAD PROTECTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1000 Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling equipment, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.1001 Minimum performance criteria for rollover protective structure for designated scrapers, loaders, dozers, graders, and crawler tractors, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.1002 Protective frame (ROPS) test procedures and performance requirements for wheel-type agricultural and industrial tractors used in construction, published 7/20/06, FR vol. 71, no. 139, p. 41127..

(d) 29 CFR 1926.1003 Overhead protection for operators of agricultural and industrial tractors, published 2/28/06, FR vol. 71, no. 39, p. 9909.

(24) Subdivision X – STAIRWAYS AND LADDERS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1050 Scope, application and definitions applicable to this Subdivision, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.1051 General requirements, published 11/14/90, FR vol. 55, no. 220, p. 47688.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.1052 Stairways, published 8/23/91, FR vol. 56, no. 164, pp. 41793-41794.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.1053 Ladders, published 8/23/91, FR vol. 56, no. 164, pp. 41793-41794.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.1054 (Reserved)

(f) 29 CFR 1926.1055 (Reserved)

(g) 29 CFR 1926.1056 (Reserved)

(h) 29 CFR 1926.1057 (Reserved)

(i) 29 CFR 1926.1058 (Reserved)

(j) 29 CFR 1926.1059 (Reserved)

(k) 29 CFR 1926.1060 Training requirements, published 11/14/90, FR vol. 55, no. 220, p. 47691.

(25) Subdivision Z – TOXIC AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1101 Asbestos, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.1126 Chromium (VI), published; 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.1127 Cadmium, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.1152 Methylene Chloride, published 12/18/97, FR vol. 62, no. 243, p. 66275.

(26) Subdivision AA – (Reserved)

(27) Subdivision BB – (Reserved)

(28) Subdivision CC – Cranes and Derricks in Construction

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1400 Scope, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.1401 Definitions, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.1402 Ground conditions, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152. Pp. 47906-48177.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.1403 Assembly/Disassembly – selection of manufacturer or employer procedures, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.1404 Assembly/Disassembly – general requirements (applies to all assembly and disassembly operations), published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.1405 Disassembly – additional requirements for dismantling of booms and jibs (applies to both the use of manufacturer procedures and employer procedures), published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152. Pp. 47906-48177.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.1406 Assembly/Disassembly – employer procedures – general requirements, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV) – assembly and disassembly, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.1408 Power line safety (up to 350 kV) – equipment operations, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.1409 Power line safety (over 35 kV), published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, vol. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.1410 Power line safety (all voltages) – equipment operations closer than the Table A zone, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(l) 29 CFR 1926.1411 Power line safety – while traveling, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(m) 29 CFR 1926.1412 Inspections, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(n) 29 CFR 1926.1413 Wire rope – inspection, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(o) 29 CFR 1926.1414 Wire rope – selection and installation criteria, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(p) 29 CFR 1926.1415 Safety devices, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(q) 29 CFR 1926.1416 Operational aids, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(r) 29 CFR 1926.1417 Operation, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(s) 29 CFR 1926.1418 Authority to stop operation, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(t) 29 CFR 1926.1419 Signals – general requirements, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(u) 29 CFR 1926.1420 Signals – radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(v) 29 CFR 1926.1421 Signals – voice signals – additional requirements, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(w) 29 CFR 1926.1422 Signals – hand signal chart, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(x) 29 CFR 1926.1423 Fall protection, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(y) 29 CFR 1926.1424 Work area control, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(z) 29 CFR 1926.1425 Keeping clear of the load, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(aa) 29 CFR 1926.1426 Free fall and controlled load lowering, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(bb) 29 CFR 1926.1427 Operator qualification and certification, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(cc) 29 CFR 1926.1428 Signal person qualifications, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(dd) 29 CFR 1926.1429 Qualifications of maintenance & repair employees, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(ee) 29 CFR 1926.1430 Training, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp.47906-48177.

(ff) 29 CFR 1926.1431 Hoisting personnel, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(gg) 29 CFR 1926.1432 Multiple-crane/derrick lifts – supplemental requirements, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(hh) 29 CFR 1926.1433 Design, construction and testing, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(ii) 29 CFR 1926.1434 Equipment modifications, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(jj) 29 CFR 1926.1435 Tower cranes, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(kk) 29 CFR 1926.1436 Derricks, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(ll) 29 CFR 1926.1437 Floating cranes/derricks and land cranes/derricks on barges, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(mm) 29 CFR 1926.1438 Overhead & gantry cranes, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(nn) 29 CFR 1926.1439 Dedicated pile drivers, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(oo) 29 CFR 1926.1440 Sideboom cranes, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(pp) 29 CFR 1926.1441 Equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds of less, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(qq) 29 CFR 1926.1442 Severability, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(rr) Appendix A to Subdivision CC of 1926 – Standard Hand Signals, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(ss) Appendix B to Subdivision CC of 1926 – Assembly/Disassembly – Sample Procedures for Minimizing the Risk of Unintended Dangerous Boom Movement, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(tt) Appendix C to Subdivision CC of 1926 – Operator Certification – Written Examination – Technical Knowledge Criteria, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(29) Subdivision DD – Cranes and Derricks Used in Demolition and Underground Construction, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1500 Scope, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp.47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.1501 Cranes and Derricks, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

These standards are available at the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, and the United States Government Printing Office.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4).
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295.
Hist.: APD 5-1989(Temp), f. 3-31-89, ef. 5-1-89; APD 8-1989, f. & ef. 7-7-89; APD 14-1989(Temp), f. 7-20-89, ef. 8-1-89; APD 15-1989, f. & ef. 9-13-89; OSHA 3-1990(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 1-19-90; OSHA 7-1990, f. & cert. ef. 3-2-90; OSHA 8-1990, f. & cert. ef. 3-30-90; OSHA 13-1990(Temp), f. 6-28-90, ef. 8-1-90; OSHA 19-1990, f. & cert. ef. 8-31-90; OSHA 27-1990, f. 12-12-90, cert. ef. 2-1-91; OSHA 6-1991, f. 3-18-91, cert. ef. 4-15-91; OSHA 7-1991, f. & cert. ef. 4-25-91; OSHA 15-1991, f. & cert. ef. 12-13-91; OSHA 16-1991, f. 12-16-91, cert. ef. 1-1-92; OSHA 6-1992, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-92; OSHA 11-1992, f. & cert. ef. 10-9-92; OSHA 1-1993, f. & cert. ef. 1-22-93; OSHA 16-1993, f. & cert. ef. 11-1-93; OSHA 4-1994, f. & cert. ef. 8-4-94; OSHA 1-1995, f. & cert. ef. 1-19-95; OSHA 3-1995, f. & cert. ef. 2-22-95; OSHA 4-1995, f. & cert. ef. 3-29-95; OSHA 5-1995, f. & cert. ef. 4-6-95; OSHA 6-1995, f. & cert. ef. 4-18-95; OSHA 8-1995, f. & cert. ef. 8-25-95; OSHA 5-1996, f. & cert. ef. 11-29-96; OSHA 6-1996, f. & cert. ef. 11-29-96; OSHA 2-1997, f. & cert. ef. 3-12-97; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 6-1997, f. & cert. ef. 5-2-97; OSHA 7-1997, f. & cert. ef. 9-15-97; OSHA 3-1998, f. & cert. ef. 7-7-98; OSHA 6-1998, f. & cert. ef. 10-15-98; OSHA 7-1998, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-98; OSHA 2-1999, f. & cert. ef. 4-30-99; OSHA 6-1999, f. & cert. ef. 5-26-99; OSHA 3-2000, f. & cert. ef. 2-8-00; OSHA 3-2001, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-01; OSHA 3-2002, f. 4-15-02, cert. ef. 4-18-02; OSHA 5-2002, f. 6-28-02 cert. ef. 10-1-03; OSHA 6-2002, f. & cert. ef. 7-19-02; OSHA 1-2003, f. 1-30-03 cert. ef. 4-30-03; OSHA 2-2003, f. & cert. ef. 1-30-03; OSHA 7-2003, f. & cert. ef. 12-5-03; OSHA 8-2003, f. 12-30-03 cert. ef. 1-1-04; OSHA 1-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-12-05; OSHA 2-2006, f. & cert. ef. 4-28-06; OSHA 4-2006, f. & cert. ef. 7-24-06; OSHA 5-2006, f. 8-7-06, cert. ef. 1-1-07; OSHA 6-2006, f. & cert. ef. 8-30-06; OSHA 10-2006, f. & cert. ef. 11-30-06; OSHA 6-2007, f. & cert. ef. 9-26-07; OSHA 5-2008, f. 5-1-08, cert. ef. 5-15-08; OSHA 5-2009, f. & cert. ef. 5-29-09; OSHA 3-2010, f. 6-10-10, cert. ef. 6-15-10; OSHA 1-2011, f. & cert. ef. 2-9-11; OSHA 4-2011, f. & cert. ef. 12-8-11; OSHA 5-2011, f. 12-8-11, cert. ef. 7-1-12; OSHA 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 4-10-12; OSHA 3-2012, f. & cert. e.f 8-20-12; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12

437-005-0001

Adoption by Reference

In addition to, and not in lieu of, any other safety and health codes contained in OAR Chapter 437, the Department adopts by reference the following federal regulations printed as part of the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1915, in the Federal Register:

(1) Subdivision A

(a) 29 CFR 1915.1. Purpose and authority, published 4/20/82, Federal Register (FR) vol. 47, p. 16984.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.2. Scope and application, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.3. Responsibility, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.4. Definitions, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.5. Incorporation by reference, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.6. Commercial diving operations, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(g) 29 CFR 1915.7. Competent person, published 7/25/94, FR vol. 59, p. 37856.

(h) 29 CFR 1915.9. Compliance duties owed to each employee, published 12/12/08, FR vol. 73, no. 240, pp. 75568-75589.

(2) Subdivision B

(a) 29 CFR 1915.11. Scope, application and definitions applicable to this Subpart, published 7/25/94, FR vol. 59, p. 37857.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.12. Precautions before entering confined and enclosed spaces and other dangerous atmospheres, published 3/16/95, FR vol. 60, no. 51, p. 14218.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.13. Cleaning and other cold work, published 7/25/94, FR vol. 59, p. 37859.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.14. Hot work, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.15. Maintenance of safe conditions, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.16. Warning signs and labels, published 7/25/94, FR vol. 59, p. 37861.Appendix A to Subpart B published 6/8/11, Federal Register, vol. 76, no. 110, p. 33590. Appendix B to Subpart B published 7/25/94, FR vol. 59, p. 37816.

(3) Subdivision C

(a) 29 CFR 1915.31. Scope & application of subdivision, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.32. Toxic cleaning solvents, published 5/24/96, FR vol. 61, no. 102, p. 26351.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.33. Chemical paint & preservative remover, published 5/24/96, FR vol. 61, no. 102, p. 26351.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.34. Mechanical paint removers, published 5/24/96, FR vol. 61, no. 102, p. 26351.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.35. Painting, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.36. Flammable liquids, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(4) Subdivision D

(a) 29 CFR 1915.51. Ventilation & protection in welding, cutting and heating, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.52. Fire prevention. REMOVED 9/15/04, FR vol. 69, p. 55667.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.53. Welding, cutting and heating of hollow metal containers & structure not covered by 1915.12, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.55. Gas welding & cutting, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.56. Arc welding and cutting, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.57. Uses of fissionable material in ship repairing and shipbuilding, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(5) Subdivision E

(a) 29 CFR 1915.71. Scaffolds or staging, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.72. Ladders, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.73. Guarding of deck openings and edges, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.74. Access to vessels, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.75. Access to and guarding of dry docks and marine railways, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.76. Access to cargo spaces and confined spaces, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(g) 29 CFR 1915.77. Working surfaces, published amended 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(6) Subdivision F

(a) 29 CFR 1915.80 Scope, application, definitions and effective dates, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.81 Housekeeping, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.82 Lighting, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.83 Utilities, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.84 Working alone, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.85 Vessel radar and communication systems, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(g) 29 CFR 1915.86 Lifeboats, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(h) 29 CFR 1915.87 Medical services and first aid, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(i) 29 CFR 1915.88 Sanitation, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(j) 29 CFR 1915.89 Control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout), published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(k) 29 CFR 1915.90 Safety color code for marking physical hazards, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(l) 29 CFR 1915.91. Accident prevention signs and tags, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(m) 29 CFR 1915.92. Retention of DOT markings, placards, and labels, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(n) 29 CFR 1915.93. Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation, and maintenance, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(o) 29 CFR 1915.94. Servicing of multi-piece and single-piece rim wheels, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(7) Subdivision G

(a) 29 CFR 1915.111. Inspection, published 4/20/ 82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.112. Ropes, chains and slings, published 6/8/11, Federal Register, vol. 76, no. 110, p. 33590.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.113. Shackles and hooks, published 6/8/11, Federal Register, vol. 76, no. 110, p. 33590.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.114. Chain falls and pull lifts, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.115. Hoisting and hauling equipment, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.116. Use of gear, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(g) 29 CFR 1915.117. Qualifications of operators, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(h) 29 CFR 1915.118. Tables, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(8) Subdivision H

(a) 29 CFR 1915.131. General precautions, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.132. Portable electric tools, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.133. Hand tools, published 4/20/ 82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.134. Abrasive wheels, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.135. Powder actuated fastening tools, published 5/24/96, FR vol. 61, no. 102, p. 26351.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.136. Internal combustion engines other than ship’s equipment, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(9) Subdivision I

(a) 29 CFR 1915.151. Scope, application and definitions, published 5/24/96, FR vol. 61, no. 102, p. 26352.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.152. General requirements, published 6/8/11, Federal Register, vol. 76, no. 110, p. 33590.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.153. Eye and face protection, published 9/9/09, FR vol. 74, no. 173, pp. 46350-46361.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.154. Respiratory protection, published 5/24/96, FR vol. 61, no. 102, p. 26354.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.155. Head protection, published 9/9/09, FR vol. 74, no. 173, pp. 46350-46361.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.156. Foot protection, published 9/9/09, FR vol. 74, no. 173, pp. 46350-46361.

(g) 29 CFR 1915.157. Hand and body protection, published 5/24/96, FR vol. 61, no. 102, p. 26354.

(h) 29 CFR 1915.158. Lifesaving equipment, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(i) 29 CFR 1915.159. Personal fall arrest systems (PFAS), published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(j) 29 CFR 1915.160. Positioning device systems, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541. Appendix A to Subpart I, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.Appendix B to Subpart I, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(10) Subdivision J

(a) 29 CFR 1915.161. Scope and application of subdivision, published 4/20/ 82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.162. Ship’s boilers, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.163. Ship’s piping systems, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.164. Ship’s propulsion machinery, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.165. Ship’s decking machinery, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(11) Subdivision K

(a) 29 CFR 1915.171. Scope and application of subdivision, published 4/20/ 82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.172. Portable air receiver and other unfired pressure vessels, published 7/3/02, FR vol. 67, no. 128, p. 44541.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.173. Drums and containers, published 4/20/82, FR vol. 47, p. 16984.

(12) Subdivision L

(a) 29 CFR 1915.181. Electrical circuits and distribution boards, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576.

(13) Subdivisions M O (Reserved)

(14) Subdivision P

(a) 29 CFR 1915.501. General provisions, published 9/15/04, FR vol. 69, p. 55667.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.502. Fire safety plan, published 9/15/04, FR vol. 69, p. 55667.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.503. Precautions for hot work, published 9/15/04, FR vol. 69, p. 55667.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.504. Fire watches, published 9/15/04, FR vol. 69, p. 55667.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.505. Fire response, published 10/17/06, FR vol. 71, no. 200, p. 60843.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.506. Hazards of fixed extinguishing systems on board vessels and vessel sections, published 9/15/04, FR vol. 69, p. 55667.

(g) 29 CFR 1915.507. Land-side fire protection systems, published 10/17/06, FR vol. 71, no. 200, p. 60843.

(h) 29 CFR 1915.508. Training, published 9/15/04, FR vol. 69, p. 55667.

(i) 29 CFR 1915.509. Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 9/15/04, FR vol. 69, p. 55667.

Appendix A to Subpart P, published 9/15/04, FR vol. 69, p. 55667.

(15) Subdivision Q-Y (Reserved)

(16) Subdivision Z

(a) 29 CFR 1915.1000, Air Contaminants, published 12/27/11, FR vol. 76, no. 248, p. 80735.

(b) 29 CFR 1915.1001, Asbestos, published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

Appendix A to 1915.1001, published 6/29/95, FR vol. 60, p. 33972.

Appendix B to 1915.1001, published 6/29/95, FR vol. 60, p. 33972.

Appendix C to 1915.1001, published 6/8/11, Federal Register, vol. 76, no. 110, p. 33590.

Appendix D to 1915.1001, published 8/10/94, FR vol. 59, p. 40964.

Appendix E to 1915.1001, published 6/29/95, FR vol. 60, p. 33972.

Appendix F to 1915.1001, published 6/29/95, FR vol. 60, p. 33972.

Appendix G to 1915.1001, published 8/10/94, FR vol. 59, p. 40964.

Appendix H to 1915.1001, published 6/29/95, FR vol. 60, p. 33972.

Appendix I to 1915.1001, published 8/10/94, FR vol. 59, p. 40964.

Appendix J to 1915.1001, published 8/10/94, FR vol. 59, p. 40964.

Appendix K to 1915.1001, published 6/29/95, FR vol. 60, p. 33972.

Appendix L to 1915.1001, published 8/23/96, FR vol. 61, p. 43454.

(c) 29 CFR 1915.1002. Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(d) 29 CFR 1915.1003. 13 Carcinogens (4 Nitrobiphenyl, etc.), published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(e) 29 CFR 1915.1004. alpha Naphthylamine, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(f) 29 CFR 1915.1005. (Reserved)

(g) 29 CFR 1915.1006. Methyl chloromethyl ether, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(h) 29 CFR 1915.1007. 3,3’Dichlorobenzidiene (and its salts), published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(i) 29 CFR 1915.1008. bis Chloromethyl ether, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(j) 29 CFR 1915.1009. beta Naphthylamine, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(k) 29 CFR 1915.1010. Benzidine, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(l) 29 CFR 1915.1011. 4 Aminodiphenyl, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(m) 29 CFR 1915.1012. Ethyleneimine, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(n) 29 CFR 1915.1013. beta Propiolactone, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(o) 29 CFR 1915.1014. 2 Acetylaminofluorene, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(p) 29 CFR 1915.1015. 4 Dimethylaminoazobenzene, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(q) 29 CFR 1915.1016. N Nitrosodimethylamine, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(r) 29 CFR 1915.1017. Vinyl chloride, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(s) 29 CFR 1915.1018. Inorganic arsenic, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(t) 29 CFR 1915.1020 Access to employee exposure and medical records, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(u) 29 CFR 1915.1025. Lead, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(v) 29 CFR 1915.1026 Chromium (VI), published 3/26/12, FR vol. 77, no. 58, p. 17574.

(w) 29 CFR 1915.1027. Cadmium, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(x) 29 CFR 1915.1028. Benzene, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(y) 29 CFR 1915.1030. Bloodborne pathogens, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(z) 29 CFR 1915.1044. 1,2 dibromo 3 chloropropane, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(aa) 29 CFR 1915.1045. Acrylonitrile, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(bb) 29 CFR 1915.1047. Ethylene oxide, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(cc) 29 CFR 1915.1048. Formaldehyde, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(dd) 29 CFR 1915.1050. Methylenedianiline, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(ee) 29 CFR 1915.1052 Methylene Chloride, published 1/10/97, Federal Register, vol. 62, no. 7, p. 1619.

(ff) 29 CFR 1915.1120 Access to employee exposure and medical records has been redesignated to §1915.1020.

(Note: 29 CFR 1915.99, Hazard Communication was redesignated as 1915.1200 on 7/1/93, FR vol. 58, no. 125, p. 35514.)

(gg) 29 CFR 1915.1200. Hazard communication, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(hh) 29 CFR 1915.1450. Occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 10-1992, f. 9-24-92, cert. ef. 11-1-92; OSHA 1-1993, f. & cert. ef. 1-22-93; OSHA 19-1993, f. & cert. ef. 12-29-93; OSHA 4-1994 f. & cert. ef. 8-4-94; OSHA 1-1995, f. & cert. ef. 1-19-95; OSHA 2-1995, f. & cert. ef. 1-25-95; OSHA 4-1995, f. & cert. ef. 3-29-95; OSHA 5-1995, f. & cert. ef. 4-6-95; OSHA 8-1995, f. & cert. ef. 8-25-95; OSHA 5-1996, f. & cert. ef. 11-29-96; OSHA 6-1996, f. & cert. ef. 11-29-96; OSHA 3-1997, f. & cert. ef. 3-28-97; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 6-1997, f. & cert. ef. 5-2-97; OSHA 7-1998, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-98; OSHA 6-1999, f. & cert. ef. 5-26-99; OSHA 4-2001, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-01; OSHA 4-2003, f. & cert. ef. 5-6-03; OSHA 8-2004, f. & cert. ef. 12-30-04; OSHA 1-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-12-05; OSHA 4-2006, f. & cert. ef. 7-24-06; OSHA 6-2006, f. & cert. ef. 8-30-06; OSHA 10-2006, f. & cert. ef. 11-30-06; OSHA 1-2007, f. 1-9-07 cert. ef. 1-16-07; OSHA 5-2008, f. 5-1-08, cert. ef. 5-15-08; OSHA 5-2009, f. & cert. ef. 5-29-09; OSHA 2-2010, f. & cert. ef. 2-25-10; OSHA 3-2010, f. 6-10-10, cert. ef. 6-15-10; OSHA 3-2011, f. & cert. ef. 11-1-11; OSHA 4-2011, f. & cert. ef. 12-8-11; OSHA 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 4-10-12; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12


 

Rule Caption: Adopt changes to confined space rules in general industry and construction.

Adm. Order No.: OSHA 6-2012

Filed with Sec. of State: 9-28-2012

Certified to be Effective: 4-1-13

Notice Publication Date: 4-1-2012

Rules Adopted: 437-002-0146

Rules Amended: 437-002-0100, 437-002-0140, 437-002-0182, 437-002-0256, 437-002-0300, 437-002-0312, 437-003-0001

Subject: Oregon OSHA adopts new rule, OAR 437-002-0146 Confined Spaces, which replaces 1910.146 Permit-Required Confined Spaces, in Division 2/J General Environmental Controls. This expands the scope of the new rule to include the construction industry.

 During the 2011 proposal, several issues were discovered that needed to be resolved. We reconvened our stakeholder groups to resolve those issues and addressed any other areas for clarification. The identified issues include: revising and including several definitions, language for closing permits, ensuring employee access to written materials, ensuring all actions required by the permit are followed, and clarifying when alternate entry cannot be used.

 Other areas amended for clarification include:

 Permit Space Program.

 • Changed the requirement to catalog all confined spaces to catalog all permit spaces.

 • If the permit program needs to be revised, the language was changed that prohibiting entry into any space; to any space that is affected by that revision until the revision is complete.

 Evacuation. Added language on what to do if entrants need to evacuate a permit space.

 Decontamination. There was language requiring patient decontamination. The group consensus was to move this language to the appendix on rescue. In its place, language was added requiring MSDSs and providing them to the medical providers.

 Rescue.

 • For non-entry rescue — modified the language to include a rescue person, as the rescue “team” may only consist of the attendant retrieving the entrant from the space.

 • For entry rescue — language change from ensuring the rescue team can proficiently perform rescues to ensuring rescue teams can efficiently perform rescues.

 • Added language requiring that, if a third-party rescue service is used, that the agreement is in writing.

 Alternate Entry.

 • Changed the language in the exception for alternate entry.

 • Added language to specify which parts of the rule don’t apply when one uses alternate entry.

 • Added a condition on when the space must be evacuated during alternate entry (new hazard or conditions change).

 Training. Moved the awareness training piece to the bottom of the training section to avoid confusion and clarified that it is only for employees who work around permit spaces.

 Records. Modified the record retention section to refer back to the rule that requires a review of the permit program.

 The requirements of this standard are similar to the requirements of the existing general industry standard, but are written to clarify employer obligations and eliminate confusing requirements.

 This rulemaking amends Oregon-initiated rules OAR 437-002-0182, 437-002-0256, and 437-002-0312 to update the rule reference to the new Oregon rule 437-002-0146 Confined Spaces. Also amended to reflect the new Confined Spaces rules are 1910.120 Appendix E, and 1910.269 that currently refer the reader to 1910.146. We also repeal 1926.21(b)(6) in Division 3/C, and place a note referring the reader to Division 2/J, 437-002-0146 Confined Spaces.

 Please visit our web site www.orosha.org

 Click ‘Rules/Compliance’ in the left vertical column and view our proposed, adopted, and final rules.

Rules Coordinator: Sue C. Joye—(503) 947-7449

437-002-0100

Adoption by Reference

In addition to, and not in lieu of, any other safety and health codes contained in OAR Chapter 437, the Department adopts by reference the following federal regulations printed as part of the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910, in the Federal Register:

(1) 29 CFR 1910.101 Compressed gases (General requirements), published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9236.

(2) 29 CFR 1910.102 Acetylene. Repealed. Oregon OSHA Admin. Order 1-2010, f. 2/19/10, ef. 2/19/10. In Oregon, OAR 437-002-2102 applies.

(3) 29 CFR 1910.103 Hydrogen, published 12/14/07, FR vol. 72, no. 240, p. 71061.

(4) 29 CFR 1910.104 Oxygen, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9237.

(5) 29 CFR 1910.105 Nitrous oxide, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9237.

(6) 29 CFR 1910.106 Flammable and combustible liquids, published 9/13/05, FR vol. 70, no. 176, p. 53925.

(7) 29 CFR 1910.107 Spray finishing using flammable and combustible materials, amended with AO 3-2003, removed 1910.107, and Oregon note added, f. and ef. 4/21/03.

(8) 29 CFR 1910.108 Reserved. Published 3/23/99, Federal Register, vol. 64, no. 55, p. 13909.

(9) 29 CFR 1910.109 Explosives and blasting agents, published 6/18/98, FR vol. 63, no. 117, p. 33466.

(10) 29 CFR 1910.110 Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases, published 12/14/07, FR vol. 72, no. 240, p. 71061.

(11) 29 CFR 1910.111 Storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia, published amended with AO 12-2001, Oregon note added, f. and ef. 10/26/01; 12/14/07, FR vol. 72, no. 240, p. 71061.

(12) Reserved for 29 CFR 1910.112 (Reserved)

(13) Reserved for 29 CFR 1910.113 (Reserved)

(14) 29 CFR 1910.114 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9238.

(15) 29 CFR 1910.115 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9238.

(16) 29 CFR 1910.116 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9238.

(17) 29 CFR 1910.119 Process safety management of highly hazardous chemicals, (NOTE: Excepted rules adopted by reference by OR-OSHA by Admin. Order 6-1994 on 9/30/94.) Amended 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9238; amended with AO 12-2001, Oregon note added, f. and ef. 10/26/01.

(18) 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous waste operations and emergency response, amended with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 6-2012, f. 9/28/12, ef. 4/1/13.

(19) 29 CFR 1910.121 Reserved. Published 3/23/99, Federal Register, vol. 64, no. 55, p. 13909.

(20) 29 CFR 1910.122 Table of contents. Repealed with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 9-2007, f. and ef. 12/3/07.

(21) 29 CFR 1910.123 Dipping and coating operations: Coverage and definitions. Repealed with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 9-2007, f. and ef. 12/3/07.

(22) 29 CFR 1910.124 General requirements for dipping and coating operations. Repealed with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 9-2007, f. and ef. 12/3/07.

(23) 29 CFR 1910.125 Additional requirements for dipping and coating operations that use flammable or combustible liquids. Repealed with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 9-2007, f. and ef. 12/3/07.

(24) 29 CFR 1910.126 Additional requirements for special dipping and coating applications. Repealed with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 9-2007, f. and ef. 12/3/07.

These standards are on file with the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, and the United States Government Printing Office.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: APD 19-1988, f. & ef. 11-17-88; APD 12-1989, f. & ef. 7-14-89; OSHA 22-1990, f. 9-28-90, cert. ef. 10-1-90; OSHA 3-1992, f. & cert. ef. 2-6-92; OSHA 3-1993, f. & cert. ef. 2-23-93; OSHA 6-1994, f. & cert. ef. 9-30-94; OSHA 3-1995, f. & cert. ef. 2-22-95; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 3-1998, f. & cert. ef. 7-7-98; OSHA 2-1999, f. & cert. ef. 4-30-99; OSHA 8-1999, f. & cert. ef. 8-6-99; OSHA 12-2001, f. & cert. ef. 10-26-01; OSHA 4-2002, f. & cert. ef. 5-30-02; OSHA 3-2003, f. & cert. ef. 4-21-03; OSHA 4-2004, f. & cert. ef. 9-15-04; OSHA 4-2005, f. & cert. ef 12-14-05; OSHA 4-2006, f. & cert. ef. 7-24-06; OSHA 9-2007, f. & cert. ef. 12-3-07; OSHA 7-2008, f. & cert. ef. 5-30-08; OSHA 1-2010, f. & cert. ef. 2-19-10; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12; OSHA 6-2012, f. 9-28-12, cert. ef. 4-1-13

437-002-0140

Adoption by Reference

In addition to and not in lieu of, any other safety and health codes contained in OAR Chapter 437, the Department adopts by reference the following federal regulations printed as part of the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910, in the Federal Register:

(1) 29 CFR 1910.141 Sanitation, published 6/8/11, Federal Register, vol. 76, no. 110, p. 33590.

(2) Reserved for 29 CFR 1910.142 Temporary labor camps.

(3) 29 CFR 1910.143 Nonwater carriage disposal systems (Reserved).

(4) 29 CFR 1910.144 Safety color code for marking physical hazards, published 12/14/07, FR vol. 72, no. 240, p. 71061.

(5) 29 CFR 1910.145 Specifications for accident prevention signs and tags, published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576; 7/25/11, FR vol. 76, no. 142, p. 44265.

(6) 29 CFR 1910.146 Permit-required confined spaces. Repealed with Oregon OSHA AO 6-2012, f. 9/28/12, ef. 4/1/13. In Oregon, OAR 437-002-0146 applies.

(7) 29 CFR 1910.147 The control of hazardous energy, (lockout/tagout); published 5/2/11, Federal Register vol. 76, no. 84, p. 24576; 7/25/11, FR vol. 76, no. 142, p. 44265.

(8) 29 CFR 1910.148 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9239.

(9) 29 CFR 1910.149 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9239.

(10) 29 CFR 1910.150 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9239.

These federal standards are on file with the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, Department of Consumer and Business Services and the United States Government Printing Office.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 2-1990, f. 1-19-90, cert. ef. 3-1-90; OSHA 4-1991, f. 2-25-91, cert. ef. 3-15-91; OSHA 13-1992, f. 12-7-92, cert. ef. 2-1-93; OSHA 8-1993, f. & cert. ef. 7-1-93; OSHA 5-1994, f. & cert. ef. 9-30-94; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 2-1999, f. & cert. ef. 4-30-99; OSHA 5-1999, f. & cert. ef. 5-26-99; OSHA 12-2001, f. & cert. ef. 10-26-01; OSHA 7-2008, f. & cert. ef. 5-30-08; OSHA 3-2011, f. & cert. ef. 11-1-11; OSHA 4-2011, f. & cert. ef. 12-8-11; OSHA 6-2012, f. 9-28-12, cert. ef. 4-1-13

437-002-0146

Confined Spaces

(1) Purpose and application. This rule applies to all activities in confined spaces and provides requirements to protect employees from the hazards of entering and working in confined spaces.

(2) Exceptions. This standard does not apply to the following:

(a) Construction work regulated by Division 3/P Excavations, except for existing sanitary sewers and new sanitary sewers when connected to an existing sanitary sewer.

(b) Construction work regulated by Division 3/S Underground Construction, Caissons, Cofferdams and Compressed Air, except for sewers.

(c) Enclosed spaces regulated by 1910.269 in Division 2/R Electric Power Generation, Transmission And Distribution, except when that standard requires compliance with this standard.

(d) Manholes and vaults regulated by 1910.268(o) in Division 2/R Telecommunications, except when those provisions are insufficient to render the space safe to enter.

(e) Welding in confined spaces regulated by Division 2/Q Welding, Cutting & Brazing, when the only hazards are related to the welding process.

(f) Grain bins, silos, tanks, and other grain storage structures regulated by 1910.272, Grain Handling Facilities.

(g) Diving operations regulated by Division 2/T, Commercial Diving Operations.

(h) Except for (a) through (g) above, when any other applicable standard addresses work in confined spaces or additional hazards that may be present, you must comply with the provisions of that standard and this standard. Where the requirements of one standard are more restrictive than the other, follow the more stringent requirements.

(3) Definitions. Acceptable entry conditions: The conditions that must exist in a permit-required confined space to allow safe entry and work. Alternate entry – An alternative process for entering a permit space under very specific conditions. The space remains a permit space even when entered using alternate entry. Atmospheric hazard (see the definition of hazardous atmosphere). Authorized – Approved by the employer or controlling contractor. Attendant — An individual stationed outside one or more permit spaces to monitor the authorized entrants and who performs all attendants duties assigned in the employer’s permit space program. Atmospheric testing — see “Testing.” Authorized entrant — An employee who is authorized by the employer to enter a permit space. Barrier — A physical obstruction that blocks or limits access. Calibration — The checking of a direct-reading instrument against an accurate standard (such as a calibration gas) to determine any deviation and correct for errors.

Note: A similar process may also be referred to as a “bump test” in which an instrument is tested with an accurate standard to ensure it is still reading correctly. For the purposes of this rule, a “bump test” performed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions can be used to verify calibration.

(a) Confined space – A space that meets all of the following: Large enough and so configured that an employee can fully enter the space and perform work. Has limited or restricted means for entry and/or exit. Is not designed for continuous human occupancy. Continuous system — a confined space that meets all of the following: Part of, and contiguous with, a larger confined space (for example, storm sewers, sanitary sewers, or steam tunnels) Cannot be isolated from the larger confined space Subject to a potential release from the larger confined space that can overwhelm control measures and/or personal protective equipment, resulting in a hazard that is immediately dangerous to life and health. Control — The action taken to reduce the level of any hazard inside a confined space using engineering methods (for example, by isolation or ventilation), and then using these methods to maintain the reduced hazard level. Control also refers to the engineering methods used for this purpose. Personal protective equipment is not a control. Controlling contractor — The employer that has overall responsibility for construction at a worksite.

Note: A controlling contractor who owns or manages a property is both a controlling contractor and a host employer.

(b) Emergency — Any occurrence (including any failure of hazard control or monitoring equipment) or event internal or external to the permit space that could endanger entrants. Engulfment hazard — A physical hazard consisting of a liquid or flowable solid substance that can surround and capture an individual. Engulfment hazards may cause death or serious physical harm if: the individual inhales the engulfing substance into the respiratory system (drowning, for example); the substance exerts excessive force on the individual’s body resulting in strangulation, constriction, or crushing; or the substance suffocates the individual. Entrant (see the definition of authorized entrant). Entry — The action by which any part of an employee’s body breaks the plane of an opening into a confined space. Entry (or entry operations) also refers to the period during which an employee occupies a confined space. Entry Permit — Written authorization from the employer, controlling contractor, or host employer to enter a permit-required confined space and perform work. Entry supervisor: The person (such as the employer, foreman, or crew chief, or any other designated employee) responsible for: Determining if acceptable entry conditions are present at a permit space where entry is planned; and Authorizing entry and overseeing entry operations; and Terminating entry as required Hazard — A physical hazard or hazardous atmosphere. Hazardous atmosphere — An existing or potential atmosphere that may expose employees to the risk of death, incapacitation, impairment of ability to self-rescue (that is, escape unaided from a permit space), injury, or acute illness from one or more of the following: A flammable gas, vapor, or mist in excess of 10 percent of its lower flammable limit. An airborne combustible dust at a concentration that meets or exceeds its lower explosive limit.

Note: This concentration may be approximated as a condition in which the dust obscures vision at a distance of 5 feet (1.52 meters) or less.

An atmospheric oxygen concentration below 19.5 percent (oxygen deficient) or above 23.5 percent (oxygen enriched).

An airborne concentration of a substance that exceeds the dose or exposure limit specified by an Oregon OSHA requirement.

Note: An atmospheric concentration of any substance that is not capable of causing death, incapacitation, impairment of ability to self-rescue, injury, or acute illness due to its health effects is not covered by this provision.

An atmosphere that presents an immediate danger to life or health (IDLH). Host employer — An employer who owns or manages the property on which confined space work is taking place. Immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) means any condition that poses an immediate or delayed threat to life or that would cause irreversible adverse health effects or that would interfere with an individual’s ability to escape unaided from a permit space.

Note: Some materials — hydrogen fluoride gas and cadmium vapor, for example — may produce immediate transient effects that, even if severe, may pass without medical attention, but are followed by sudden, possibly fatal collapse 12 - 72 hours after exposure. The victim “feels normal” from recovery from transient effects until collapse. Such materials in hazardous quantities are considered to be “immediately” dangerous to life or health.

(c) Inerting — The displacement of the atmosphere in a permit space by a noncombustible gas (such as nitrogen) to such an extent that the resulting atmosphere is noncombustible.

Note: This procedure produces an IDLH oxygen-deficient atmosphere.

(d) Isolation: The process by which a permit-required confined space is removed from service and completely protected against the release of energy and material into the space by such means as: Blanking or blinding. Misaligning or removing sections of lines, pipes, or ducts. A double block and bleed system. Lockout or tagout of all sources of energy. Blocking or disconnecting all mechanical linkages. Mobile worker — An employee who performs their work in multiple locations such as customer sites, company offices, private homes, vendor offices, or construction sites. Monitor or monitoring — The process used to identify and evaluate the atmosphere in a permit space after an authorized entrant enters the space. This is a process of checking for changes in the atmospheric conditions within a permit space and is performed in a periodic or continuous manner after the completion of the initial testing of that space. (See also “testing.”) Non-entry rescue – Retrieval of entrants from a permit space without entering the permit space. Permit-required confined space (permit space) – A confined space that has one or more of the following characteristics: Contains, or has a potential to contain, a hazardous atmosphere. Contains a material that has the potential to engulf an entrant. Has an internal configuration such that an entrant could become trapped or asphyxiated by inwardly converging walls or by a floor which slopes downward and tapers to a smaller cross-section. Contains any other recognized serious safety or health hazard that can inhibit an entrants ability to self-rescue. Physical hazard: An existing or potential hazard that can cause death or serious physical harm in or near a confined space, or a hazard that has a reasonable probability of occurring in or near a confined space, and includes, but is not limited to: Explosives; mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, and pneumatic energy; radiation; temperature extremes; engulfment; noise; and inwardly converging surfaces; and Chemicals that can cause death or serious physical harm through skin or eye contact (rather than through inhalation). Potential hazards — All reasonably anticipated conditions within the space and outside the space that can adversely affect conditions within the space. Rescue — Retrieving employees who are unable to remove themselves from a permit space. Rescue service — The onsite or offsite personnel who the employer designates to engage in non-entry and/or entry rescue of employees from a permit space. Retrieval system — The equipment, including mechanical retrieval devices, used for non-entry rescue of authorized entrants from a permit space. Serious physical harm — An impairment in which a body part is made functionally useless or is substantially reduced in efficiency. Such impairment may include loss of consciousness or disorientation, and may be permanent or temporary, or chronic or acute. Injuries involving such impairment would usually require treatment by a physician or other licensed health-care professional while an illness resulting in serious physical harm could shorten life or substantially reduce physical or mental efficiency by impairing a normal bodily function or body part. Testing: The process of identifying and evaluating the atmospheric hazards that entrants may be exposed to in a permit-required confined space. Testing includes specifying the initial tests that are to be performed in the permit space. (See also “monitor or monitoring”)

Note: Testing enables employers both to devise and implement adequate control measures for the protection of authorized entrants and to determine if acceptable entry conditions are present immediately prior to and during entry.

Ventilate or ventilation - Controlling a hazardous atmosphere using powered equipment, such as fans and blowers, to continuously move air. You – The employer. Table.

(4) Evaluation.

(a) You must determine if there are confined spaces in your workplace. Ensure all confined spaces are part of this determination.

(A) Exceptions:

(i) Employers of mobile workers where the employer or controlling contractor is not the property owner are not required to perform this evaluation, but must follow the requirements of (4)(c) through (4)(e).

(ii) On sites where confined spaces are being built, the host employer or controlling contractor is not responsible for performing this determination unless:

(I) Any of their employees enter that space.

(II) An agent of the employer enters that space.

(III) Employees of an employer responsible to that controlling contractor or host employer enter that space.

(IV) They assume control over that space.

(B) Before employees of another employer enter a confined space under your control, and you have information related to paragraph (4)(b), you must provide it to that employer.

(b) You must evaluate all of your confined spaces to determine if they are permit-required confined spaces. This evaluation must include:

(A) Any known or anticipated hazard.

(B) The determination from any previous evaluation of that space.

(C) Any precautions and procedures previously implemented for entering the space.

(c) When your employees are mobile, you must determine if they will be exposed to confined spaces at their assigned work locations, and if those spaces are subject to any hazards. This determination must include information, if any, from the host employer or controlling contractor.

(A) Determine if the space meets the definition of a confined space.

(B) Identify any physical and atmospheric hazards that make the space a permit-required confined space.

(d) When a space has hazards that make it a permit space:

(A) Develop and implement a means so employees can identify that space. Signs, labels, or tags are methods that can be used to accomplish this.

(B) Allow employees or their representatives to observe the evaluation or re-evaluation of the space.

(C) When conditions within a confined space or a permit space change, re-evaluate it.

(D) Take all necessary measures to prevent unauthorized employees from entering permit spaces.

(e) Ensure employees do not enter any unevaluated confined space until it is fully evaluated.

(5) Permit-Required Confined Space Entry Program and Permits.

(a) When employees must enter a permit space, develop and implement a written program that describes the means, practices, and procedures to safely identify and enter permit spaces.

(b) Ensure this program includes:

(A) Documentation of entry permit procedures.

(B) Measures taken to prohibit unauthorized persons from entering permit spaces.

(C) Designation of employee roles, such as entrants, attendants, entry supervisors, rescuers, or those who test or monitor the atmosphere in a permit space.

(D) Identification of designated employee duties.

(E) Training on the written program and entry permits.

(F) Training employees on their designated roles.

(G) Instructions to identify and evaluate hazards.

(H) Methods to eliminate and/or control hazards.

(I) Instructions on equipment use and maintenance.

(J) Instructions to coordinate entry with another employer.

(K) Procedures necessary for concluding the entry and canceling the permit after entry operations have been completed.

(b) On fixed sites, ensure this program also includes:

(A) The location of all permit spaces.

(B) The reason for the classification of each permit space or each type of permit space.

Note: Where there are multiple permit spaces of the same type that have the same hazards, such as sewers, water vaults, or valve pits, the exact location of each space does not need to be identified so long as there is enough information so that employees can readily identify each type of space and its hazards at each location.

(C) Exception: The location of permit spaces at remote unmanned locations do not need to be added to the program until the first time employees go to that location after the effective date of this rule.

(c) Ensure employees and their representatives have access to the written program.

(d) Ensure procedures are developed and implemented for issuing permits. Ensure these procedures include how to:

(A) Evaluate the hazards of the space.

(B) Evaluate hazards of the work to be performed.

(C) Identify safe entry conditions.

(e) Ensure entry permits include the following information:

(A) The space to be entered.

(B) The purpose of the entry.

(C) The date, start, and stop times of the permit.

(D) The hazards of the space.

(E) Acceptable entry conditions.

(F) Results of initial tests and periodic monitoring performed to evaluate and identify the hazards and conditions of the space, or the period for continuous monitoring, accompanied by the names or initials of the testers and by an indication of when the tests were performed.

(G) Appropriate measures used before entry to isolate the space and eliminate or control hazards. Examples of appropriate measures include the de-energizing and lockout or tagging of equipment, and procedures for purging, inerting, ventilating, and flushing permit spaces.

(H) Names of entrants and current attendants.

(I) The signature of the original supervisor authorizing entry.

(J) The current entry supervisor.

(K) Communication procedures for entrants and attendants to maintain contact during the entry.

(L) Equipment provided for safe entry, such as:

(i) Personal protective equipment (PPE)

(ii) Testing and monitoring equipment

(iii) Communications equipment

(iv) Alarm systems

(v) Rescue equipment

(M) Rescue services available, and how to contact them.

(N) Other information needed for safety in the particular permit space

(O) Additional permits issued for work in the space, such as for hot work.

(P) Any problems, if any, encountered during the entry.

(f) Ensure entrants or their authorized representatives have access to the completed permit before entry so they can confirm that pre-entry preparations have been completed.

(g) Review the permit program when there is any reason to believe that employees are not adequately protected, and revise it as necessary.

(A) Situations that require this review include:

(i) Unauthorized entry of a permit space.

(ii) A previously unrecognized hazard is discovered.

(iii) A condition prohibited by the permit or permit program exists.

(iv) An injury or near-miss occurs during entry.

(v) An employee reports concerns about the effectiveness of the program.

(vi) Any other condition that affects employee safety or health.

(B) When revising the permit program to correct hazard-related deficiencies, do not allow entries into affected permit spaces to be made until the revisions are complete.

(C) Ensure employees and their representatives have access to the revised permit program.

(h) Review permits within one year of their cancellation to evaluate:

(A) The permit program.

(B) The protection provided to employees entering permit spaces.

(6) Permit Entry.

(a) Perform initial testing for atmospheric hazards, where necessary, before entry is made.

(b) Provide each entrant or their authorized representative with the results of any initial testing before they enter the space.

(c) Ensure safe entry conditions are maintained for the duration of the entry.

(A) When the space is too large to isolate, or is part of a continuous system, such as a sewer, ensure continuous monitoring where entrants are working for the duration of the entry

(B) When an entrant or their authorized representative has reason to believe that the testing or monitoring was inadequate, re-test the space.

(d) Ensure all actions and precautions identified on the permit are followed.

(e) When conditions require the space to be evacuated, do not allow re-entry unless you:

(A) Re-assess the conditions of the space to ensure it is safe for re-entry and ensure the permit reflects the evacuation and subsequent re-assessment; or

(B) Issue a new permit.

(f) Allow entrants or their authorized representatives the opportunity to observe monitoring, testing, and all other actions taken to eliminate or control the hazards of the space.

(7) Equipment.

(a) When employees enter permit spaces, provide the following equipment as necessary:

(A) Testing and monitoring equipment.

(B) Ventilating equipment, when needed, used to obtain and maintain acceptable entry conditions.

(C) Communication equipment, such as a two-way radio, for effective communication between the attendant and all entrants, and to initiate rescue when necessary.

(D) Lighting equipment needed to ensure employees can see well enough to work safely and exit the space quickly in the event of an emergency.

(E) Barriers or shields to protect entrants from external hazards, such as pedestrians and vehicles.

(F) Ladders or other equipment to safely enter and exit the space.

(G) Rescue and emergency equipment necessary to safely and effectively rescue entrants.

(H) Any other equipment necessary to safely enter and exit the space.

(I) Personal protective equipment as mandated by any applicable Oregon OSHA standard.

(b) Provide all necessary equipment at no cost to employees.

(c) Ensure all equipment is maintained and used in accordance with the instructions from the manufacturer.

(d) Ensure all employees who use equipment are trained in the use of that equipment.

(8) Personnel.

(a) Before employees enter permit spaces, designate entrants, attendants, and entry supervisors.

Note: The entry supervisor can also be either the attendant or entrant.

(b) Entrants must:

(A) Know the hazards that may be faced during entry, including information on the type of hazard, as well as signs, symptoms, and consequences of exposure to those hazards.

(B) Communicate with the attendant as necessary so the attendant can monitor the entrant’s status and to enable the attendant to alert entrants of the need to evacuate the space.

(C) Alert the attendant whenever the entrant detects a dangerous or hazardous condition or warning sign or symptom of exposure to a dangerous situation.

(D) Exit from the permit space as quickly as possible whenever:

(i) An order to evacuate is given by the attendant or the entry supervisor, or

(ii) The entrant recognizes any warning sign or symptom of exposure to a dangerous situation, or

(iii) The entrant detects a dangerous or hazardous condition, or

(iv) An evacuation alarm is activated.

(c) Attendants must:

(A) Know the hazards that may be faced during entry, including information on the type of hazard, as well as signs, symptoms, and consequences of exposure to those hazards.

(B) Be aware of possible behavioral effects of hazard exposure in authorized entrants.

(C) Continuously maintain an accurate count of authorized entrants in the permit space and ensure that the means used to identify authorized entrants accurately identifies who is in the permit space.

(D) Remain outside the permit space during entry operations until relieved by another attendant.

(E) Communicate with authorized entrants as necessary to monitor entrant status and to alert entrants of the need to evacuate the space.

(F) Monitor activities inside and outside the space to determine if it is safe for entrants to remain in the space and order the authorized entrants to evacuate the permit space immediately under any of the following conditions:

(i) If the attendant detects a dangerous or hazardous condition;

(ii) If the attendant detects the behavioral effects of hazard exposure in an authorized entrant;

(iii) If the attendant detects a situation outside the space that could endanger the authorized entrants; or

(iv) If the attendant cannot effectively and safely perform all the duties required of the attendant

(G) Summon rescue and other emergency services as soon as the attendant determines that authorized entrants may need assistance to escape from permit space hazards;

(H) Take the following actions when unauthorized persons approach or enter a permit space while entry is underway:

(i) Warn the unauthorized persons that they must stay away from the permit space;

(ii) Advise the unauthorized persons that they must exit immediately if they have entered the permit space; and

(iii) Inform the authorized entrants and the entry supervisor if unauthorized persons have entered the permit space;

Note: The employer can give the attendant the authority to remove unauthorized individuals who enter or who attempt to enter the permit space during entry operations, so long as the attendant does not enter the space.

(I) Perform non-entry rescues as specified by the employer’s rescue procedure; and

(J) Perform no duties that might interfere with the attendant’s primary duty to monitor and protect any authorized entrant.

NOTE: An attendant may monitor more than one space at a time, but the duties in relation to one space may not interfere with the duties for any other spaces. If an attendants’ attention is focused on one space, such as to initiate the rescue procedures, all other spaces that the attendant is monitoring must be evacuated or another attendant must take over those duties first.

(d) Entry supervisors must:

(A) Know the hazards that may be faced during entry, including information on the type of hazard, as well as signs, symptoms, and consequences of exposure to those hazards

(B) Understand the means and methods to control and/or eliminate the hazards of the permit space

(C) Verify, by checking that the appropriate entries have been made on the permit, that all tests specified by the permit have been conducted and that all procedures and equipment specified by the permit are in place before endorsing the permit and allowing entry to begin

(D) Inform entrants and attendants of the hazards and conditions associated with the space and the methods used to eliminate and/or control those hazards

(E) Terminate the entry and cancel the permit as required by the permit entry program

(F) Verify that rescue services are available and that the means for summoning them are operable

(G) Remove unauthorized individuals who enter or who attempt to enter the permit space during entry operations.

(H) Reevaluate the conditions within the space whenever responsibility for a permit space entry operation is transferred and at intervals dictated by the hazards and operations performed within the space.

(9) Rescue.

(a) Before employees enter a permit space, develop and implement procedures to remove entrants in the event of an emergency or when they are unable to self-rescue. These procedures must include:

(A) The process for summoning rescue services.

(B) The process for summoning emergency medical services or transporting injured entrants to a medical facility.

(C) If an injured entrant is exposed to a substance for which a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) or other similar written information is required to be kept at the worksite, that MSDS or written information must be made available to the medical facility treating the exposed entrant.

(b) Where feasible, use non-entry retrieval systems or methods whenever an authorized entrant enters a permit space, unless it would increase the overall risk to the entrant or would not contribute to the rescue of the entrant.

(A) Non-entry Rescue.

(i) Use a retrieval system that meets the following requirements.

(I) Each authorized entrant must use a chest or full body harness, with a retrieval line attached at the center of the entrant’s back near shoulder level, above the entrant’s head, or at another point which you can establish presents a profile small enough for the successful removal of the entrant. Wristlets or ankle straps or other equally effective means may be used in lieu of the chest or full body harness if you can demonstrate that the use of a chest or full body harness is infeasible or creates a greater hazard and that the use of other methods are the safest and most effective alternative.

(II) Attach the other end of the retrieval line to a mechanical device or fixed point outside the permit space so that rescue can begin as soon as the attendant becomes aware that rescue is necessary. Ensure a mechanical device is available to retrieve personnel from vertical type permit spaces more than 5 feet (1.52 m) deep.

(ii) Designate a rescue person or team to perform rescues in a timely manner.

Note: The response time is based on the hazards of the space. For example, IDLH hazards require an immediate response, and responders would need to be available on-site during the duration of the entry.

(iii) Ensure all rescuers are trained in basic first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). At least one member must be certified in first aid and CPR.

(iv) Rescuers must practice performing permit space rescues at least once every 12 months.

(I) The practice rescue must include every type of space in which the rescue team may perform rescues.

(II) The practice rescue must include removing persons, dummies, or manikins from the actual permit spaces or representative spaces that have similar opening size, configuration, and accessibility issues as the actual permit spaces where rescue may be performed.

(III) Exception: Rescuers do not need to perform annual practice rescues when mobile workers enter a permit space when, prior to beginning entry operations, the employees designated to perform non-entry rescue (including attendants, if applicable):

(i) Have access to the permit space to be entered or to a simulated permit space; and

(ii) Develop appropriate rescue plans; and

(iii) Conduct practice rescue operations in accordance with (8)(b)(A)(iv)(II).

(B) Entry Rescue.

(i) Where non-entry rescue is not feasible or would increase the overall risk to the entrant, designate a rescue team before employees enter any permit space.

(ii) Ensure the rescue team:

(I) Can respond to a rescue call in a timely manner. Timeliness is based on the identified hazards of the space. Rescuers must be able to reach potential victims within an appropriate time frame based on the identified hazards of the permit space.

(II) Can efficiently rescue employees from permit spaces.

(III) Has the appropriate equipment to rescue employees from all permit spaces employees enter.

(iii) Inform each rescue team or service about the hazards they may confront when called to perform rescue.

(iv) Provide the rescue team or service with access to all permit spaces from which rescue may be necessary.

(v) Provide rescue team members with personal protective equipment (PPE) needed for safe entry and any other equipment required to safely conduct rescues.

(vi) Use and maintain all equipment according to the instructions from the manufacturer.

(vii) Rescue teams must practice performing permit space rescues at least once every 12 months.

(I) The practice rescue must include the different kinds of spaces in which the rescue team may perform rescues.

(II) The practice rescue must include removing persons, dummies, or manikins from the actual permit spaces or representative spaces that have similar opening size, configuration, and accessibility issues as the actual permit spaces where rescue may be performed.

(III) Exception: The rescue team does not need to perform annual practice rescues when mobile workers enter a permit space when, prior to beginning entry operations, the employees designated to perform rescue:

(i) Have access to the permit space to be entered or to a simulated permit space; and

(ii) Develop appropriate rescue plans; and

(iii) Conduct practice rescue operations in accordance with (8)(b)(B)(vii)(II).

(viii) Rescue team personnel must have the same training and proficiencies as a permit space entrant, attendant, and/or entry supervisor.

(ix) Ensure all rescue team members are trained in basic first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). At least one member must be certified in first aid and CPR.

Note: Additional medical training, such as oxygen administration, the use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs), and personnel decontamination should be considered.

(x) When a third-party rescue service is used, ensure that the service is:

(I) Aware that they are so designated and agree to it in writing prior to entry.

(II) Capable of performing all required rescue operations.

(III) Trained in first aid and CPR, and at least one member is certified in first aid and CPR.

(C) Third-party entry rescue providers.

(i) In addition to the requirements of this rule, employers that provide entry rescue services must:

(I) Obtain information required by paragraph (4) regarding every permit space in which entry rescue by your employees may be necessary.

(II) Be familiar with the policies and procedures as described in paragraph (9)(a).

(ii) When activated to perform a rescue, without entering the space and using the entry permit, evaluate the space to:

(I) Identify all physical and atmospheric hazards.

(II) Determine the precautions and procedures to follow for entry into the space.

(10) Alternate Entry.

(a) Permit spaces may be entered without a permit when:

(A) All hazards have been eliminated; or

(B) All physical hazards, if any, have been eliminated and all atmospheric hazards are controlled with continuous forced-air ventilation.

Note: For purposes of this rule, “hazard elimination” means that the conditions which caused the hazard no longer exist within the space.

Note: Continuous forced-air ventilation does not eliminate atmospheric hazards. It only controls the hazards.

(b) Exception: Alternate entry cannot be used to enter a continuous system unless you can positively isolate the area to be entered from the rest of the space or can demonstrate and document that the conditions which caused the hazard no longer exist within the system during the entry.

(c) When employees enter permit spaces under alternate entry, you do not need to comply with the requirements of paragraphs (5), (6), (8), (9), and (12) of this rule for those entries.

(d) Develop and implement procedures for each space that can be entered with alternate entry procedures. These procedures must address:

(A) The hazards of the space.

(B) The methods used to eliminate hazards.

(C) The methods used to ensure that the hazards have been eliminated.

(D) The methods used to test the atmosphere within the space, where applicable, for all atmospheric hazards.

(E) The methods used to determine if unsafe conditions arise before or during entry.

(F) The criteria and conditions for evacuating the space during entry.

(G) The methods for training employees in these procedures.

(H) The methods for ensuring employees follow these procedures.

(e) When using ventilation to control atmospheric hazards:

(A) Use only properly calibrated direct-reading meters to test the atmosphere.

(B) Ensure direct-reading instruments are used and tested according to the instructions and recommendations from the instrument manufacturer.

(C) Test the atmosphere for all identified atmospheric hazards before entering the space.

(D) Ensure employees only enter after testing verifies that all atmospheric hazards are adequately controlled by the ventilation.

(E) Perform continuous monitoring for all atmospheric hazards during the entry.

(F) Immediately evacuate the space:

(i) When monitoring indicates the return of atmospheric hazards

(ii) Upon any failure with the direct-reading instrument.

(iii) Upon any failure with the ventilation.

(iv) When a new hazard is introduced or conditions within the space change.

(f) Ensure all employees or their representatives who will conduct the entry have the opportunity to observe all activities used to comply with this section.

(g) Ensure all employees who conduct entry have an effective means of communication, such as a two-way radio, cell phone, or voice if other employees are present, to summon help while within the space.

(h) When a space is evacuated, it cannot be re-entered as an alternate entry unless:

(A) The conditions that necessitated the evacuation are corrected; and

(B) The re-entry is treated and documented as a new entry.

(i) Document each entry. This documentation must include:

(A) The location of the space.

(B) The hazards of the space.

(C) The measures taken to eliminate the hazards.

(D) When applicable, the measures used to control the atmospheric hazards

(E) When applicable, the identity of the direct-reading instruments used to test the atmosphere, including the date of calibration.

(F) When applicable, the results of the atmospheric testing.

(G) The date of the entry.

(H) The duration of the entry.

(I) When applicable, any and all conditions that required the evacuation of the space.

(J) The name, title, and signature of the person responsible for ensuring the safe entry conditions.

(j) Maintain this documentation for the duration of the entry at the location of the entry.

(11) Training.

(a) Train each employee involved in permit space activities so they acquire the understanding, knowledge, and skills necessary to safely perform their duties, according to their assigned responsibilities.

(A) Provide training:

(i) For all new employees

(ii) Before an employee is assigned permit space duties

(iii) Before there is a change in an employee’s assigned duties

(iv) When there is a hazard for which the employee hasn’t already been trained

(v) When there are changes to the permit program

(vi) When the permit audit shows deficiencies

(vii) Whenever there is a deviation from the established procedures or employee knowledge of the procedures is inadequate

(b) Document employee training. Ensure the documentation:

(A) Contains the employee’s name, the name and signature of the trainer, and the date of training.

(B) Contains the responsibilities for which they were trained.

(C) Is available for inspection by employees and their authorized representative.

(c) Ensure each employee is proficient in their assigned duties.

(d) Awareness training:

(A) Provide awareness training to all employees whose work operations are or may be in an area where permit spaces are present to explain:

(i) The permit space program

(ii) The entry permit system

(iii) The alternate entry procedures, if used

(iv) How to recognize permit spaces in their work area

(B) Provide this training:

(i) For all new affected employees

(ii) For all employees whose duties change to include work in areas with permit spaces

(iii) When inadequacies in an employee’s knowledge indicate that the employee has not retained the requisite understanding

(iv) When there is a change in the permit program

(v) When there are new or previously unidentified permit spaces

(12) Multi-employer worksites.

(a) Unless you fall within an exemption under paragraph (4)(A)(a), before employees of another employer enter permit spaces under your control, you must:

(A) Inform the employer and their employees:

(i) That the workplace contains permit spaces and can be entered only when the applicable requirements of this rule are met

(ii) Of the identified hazards and your experience with each permit space they will enter

(iii) Of any precautions or procedures you require to protect employees in or near spaces where the work will be performed

(B) Coordinate entry operations with the employer, when employees of different employers will be working in or near the same permit spaces.

(C) Discuss entry operations with the employer after they are complete. This discussion must include:

(i) The program followed during permit space entry: and

(ii) Any hazards confronted or created

(b) When your employees enter a permit space under the control of another entity, at the conclusion of entry operations, inform the controlling contractor and host employer about the precautions and procedures you followed and any hazards that were present or that developed during entry operations.

(13) Records. Keep cancelled permits for at least one year from the date the permit expires for review (see paragraph (5)(i)).

Note: Additional record retention requirements may apply under OAR 437-002-1910.1020. “Access to Employee Medical and Exposure Records.”

Appendices.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 6-2012, f. 9-28-12, cert. ef. 4-1-13

437-002-0182

Oregon Rules for Fire Fighters.

(1) Scope and Application.

(a) These rules apply to all activities, operations and equipment of employers and employees providing fire protection services, emergency first response, and related activities that are subject to the provisions of the Oregon Safe Employment Act. These rules do not apply to the following exempted fire fighting activities:

(A) Aircraft fire fighting and rescue;

(B) Forest and uncultivated, wildland fire fighting;

(C) Private industry fire brigades.

(D) Marine Fire Fighting and rescue.

EXCEPTION: When a public fire department elects to participate in one or more of the exempted fire fighting activities, that fire department must comply with all of the provisions of OAR 437-002-0182.

(b) The provisions of OAR 437-002-0182 must be supplemented by the provisions of other applicable safety and health rules of Oregon OSHA.

(2) Definitions.

Aerial device: An aerial ladder, elevating platform, aerial ladder platform, or water tower that is designed to position personnel, handle materials, provide egress and discharge water. Afterflame: The time a test specimen continues to flame after the flame source has been removed. ANSI: American National Standards Institute. Apparatus: A mobile piece of fire fighting equipment such as pumper, water tender, etc. Confined space means a space that: Is large enough and so configured that a person can bodily enter and perform assigned work; and Has limited or restricted means for entry or exit (for example, tanks, vessels, silos, storage bins, hoppers, vaults, and pits are spaces that may have limited means of entry); and

Is not designed for continuous occupancy.

Drill tower: A structure, which may or may not be attached to the station that is over two stories high and primarily used for nonclassroom training of the fire fighters in fire service techniques. Emergency incident: Any situation where the fire department delivers emergency services, rescue, fire suppression, medical treatment, and other forms of hazard control and mitigation. Emergency scene: The site where the suppression of a fire or the emergency exists. Fire chief: An employer representative responsible for managing the fire department’s operation.

Fire fighter: A person involved in performing fire department duties and responsibilities, including fire suppression. A fire fighter may be a career or volunteer member of a fire department and may occupy any position or rank within the fire department. Fire retardant: A material to reduce, stop or prevent flame spread. Fire training: Training received by fire fighters to maintain proficiency in performing their assigned duties.

Flame-resistance: The property of materials, or combinations of component materials, to retard ignition and restrict the spread of flame.

Hazardous material incident: The accidental release of hazardous materials from their containers. Helmet: A head protective device consisting of a rigid shell, energy absorption system, and chin strap intended to protect the head against impact, flying or falling objects, electric shock, penetration, heat, and flame. Hose tower: A vertical structure where a hose is hung to dry.

Immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH): Any condition that poses a threat to life, could cause irreversible adverse health effects, or could interfere with an individual’s ability to escape unaided from a confined space. IFSTA: International Fire Service Training Association.

Lifeline: The rope that secures employees when in extremely hazardous areas. Live fire training: Any fire set within a structure, tank, pipe, pan, etc., under controlled conditions to facilitate the training of fire fighters under actual fire conditions. MSHA: Mine Safety and Health Administration. NFPA: National Fire Protection Association.

Nondestructive testing: A test to determine the characteristics or properties of a material or substance that does not involve its destruction or deterioration. Private Industry Fire Brigades: A group of employees within an industry who are required to fight interior structural fires at their place of employment. Protective clothing: The clothing or equipment worn to protect the head, body, and extremities from chemical, physical, and health hazards. Rescue saw (Cutoff saw): A powered saw with a large circular cutting blade covered in part by a movable guard used to cut metal, wood, or concrete enclosures. Respirators: Atmosphere-supplying respirator is a respirator that supplies the respirator user with air from a source independent of the ambient atmosphere, and includes supplied-air respirators (SARs) and self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) units.

Air-purifying respirator is a respirator with an air-purifying filter, cartridge, or canister that removes specific air contaminants by passing ambient air through the air-purifying element. Positive Pressure demand respirator is a respirator in which the pressure inside the respiratory inlet covering exceeds the ambient air pressure outside the respirator.

Pressure demand respirator is a positive pressure atmosphere-supplying respirator that admits air to the facepiece when the positive pressure is reduced inside the facepiece by inhalation. SCBA is a self-contained breathing apparatus designed to provide the wearer with a supply of respirable air carried in and generated by the breathin apparatus. This apparatus requires no intake of oxygen from the outside atmosphere, and can be designed to be a demand or pressure demand type respirator.

Supplied-air respirator (SAR) or airline respirator is an atmosphere-supplying respirator for which the source of breathing air is not designed to be carried by the user. Responding: Answering an emergency call or other alarm. Scabbard: A guard that prevents injury and covers the blade and pick of an axe or other sharp instrument when worn by the fire fighter.

Station (Fire station): Structure to house the fire service apparatus and personnel. Tailboard: Standing space at rear of an engine or pumper apparatus where fire fighters ride.

Training: Instruction with hands-on practice in the operation of equipment, including respiratory protection equipment, that is expected to be used and in the performance of assigned duties.

Warning light: A flashing or rotating light.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

(3) Organizational statement. The employer must prepare and maintain a statement or written policy that includes basic organizational structure and functions of the organization, in addition to the type, amount, and frequency of training to be provided to fire fighters. This statement must be made available for inspection by the administrator and by employees or their designated representatives.

(4) Personnel.

(a) The employer must review and evaluate the physical capability of each employee annually to determine their ability to perform duties that may be assigned. The review and evaluation will be accomplished through physical examination, stress testing, or satisfactory performance demonstrated during the performance of their assigned duties.

(b) The employer must not permit an employee with known medical condition that would significantly impair their ability to engage in fire suppression activities at the emergency scene unless a physician’s certificate of the employees’ fitness to participate in such activities is provided. This will not limit the employer’s ability to assign personnel to support activities (versus fire suppression activities).

(5) Employer’s Responsibility.

(a) Each employer must comply with the provisions of this division to protect the life, safety, and health of employees.

(b) It is the responsibility of the employer to establish and supervise:

(A) A safe and healthful working environment, as it applies to nonemergency conditions or to emergency conditions at the scene after the incident has been terminated, as determined by the officer in charge.

(B) Programs for training employees in the fundamentals of accident prevention.

(C) A safe and healthful working environment as it applies to live fire training exercises.

(c) The employer must maintain all equipment in a safe condition.

(d) The employer must see that employees who participate in exempted fire fighting activities listed in OAR 437-002-0182(1) are properly trained, protected, clothed, and equipped for the known hazards of that particular emergency operation. The following note refers to the Respiratory Protection Standard, 1910.134(g)(3) and (4), Procedures for Interior Structural Fire Fighting (“two-in/two-out rule”) adopted in Oregon on July 7, 1998.

NOTE: If, upon arriving at the scene, members find an imminent life threatening situation where immediate action may prevent the loss of life or serious injury, the requirements for personnel in the outside standby mode may be suspended, when notification is given by radio to incoming companies that they must provide necessary support and backup upon their arrival.

(6) Employee’s Responsibility.

(a) Each fire fighter must comply with the sections of OAR 437-002-0182 that are applicable to their own actions and conduct in the course of their employment.

(b) Fire fighters must notify the appropriate employer or safety committee representative of unsafe practices, equipment, or workplaces.

(c) All fire fighters, at regularly scheduled times, must attend required training and orientation programs designed to increase their competency in occupational safety and health.

(d) Fire fighters and other employees must apply the principles of accident prevention in their work. They must use all required safety devices and protective equipment.

(e) Each fire fighter must take proper care of their protective equipment.

(f) Fire fighters who are expected to perform fire fighting operations must notify their employer when health conditions arise that will limit their capability of performing those duties.

(7) Safety Committee.

(a) Fire departments must have a separate safety committee or hold safety meetings according to the requirements of OAR 437-001-0765 in Division 1, General Administrative Rules.

(b) When applicable, the representation on the safety committee must include both career and volunteer fire fighters.

(8) Incident Management. An incident management system that meets the requirements of NFPA standard 1561, on Fire Department Incident Management, must be established with written standard operating procedures, applying to all members involved in emergency operations. All members involved in emergency operations must be familiar with the system.

(9) Accountability.

(a) The fire department must establish written standard operating procedures for a personnel accountability system according to Section 2-6, 1995 of NFPA 1561, standard on Fire Department Incident Management System, that provides for the tracking and inventory of all members operating at an emergency incident.

(b) It is the responsibility of all members operating at an emergency incident to actively participate in the personnel accountability system.

(10) Fire Fighting Training and Education.

(a) The employer or employer representative must establish and implement a policy for educating and training throughout the fire fighting classifications (ranks). Such education and training must be provided to fire fighters before they perform assigned duties on a continuing basis.

(b) Before fire fighters participate in structural fire fighting activities, or in live fire training in a structure, they must meet the training levels prescribed by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training’s (DPSST) ‘Entry-level Firefighter’ or have equivalent training.

(c) When live fire training occurs, it must be conducted under the direction of the fire department training officer, or employer authorized representative. All live fire training must be conducted following the requirements of Appendix C of this standard.

(d) During live fire training, fire fighters must wear the protective equipment normally required for that type of fire fighting.

(e) When rope rescue training occurs, it must be conducted under the direction of the fire department training officer or department-designated authority according to the equipment manufacturers’ recommendations. The training officer must keep records of the manufacturers’ training requirements, and must comply with all such requirements.

(f) All fire hoses used by fire departments for training and fire combat must meet the service testing requirements noted in Chapter 5 of NFPA 1962, 1993 edition.

(g) The employer must provide training for the purpose, proper selection, fitting, and limitations of personal protective equipment.

(h) The employer must ensure that each employee is informed of the procedure of reporting unsafe work conditions or equipment.

(11) General Requirements for Protective Clothing.

(a) The employer must provide employees all required protective clothing, except that an employee may opt to supply protective clothing. The employer must provide the protective clothing at no cost to employees. The protective clothing must meet the requirements in OAR 437-002-0182(11) through (16), whether supplied by the employer or employee.

(b) The employer must ensure that new protective clothing intended for structural fire fighting that is ordered, used, or purchased after the effective date of this division, meets the requirements contained in OAR 437-002-0182(11) through (16). The employer must ensure that fire fighters wear this clothing when performing structural fire fighting.

(c) In situations other than structural fire fighting, the employer must ensure that protective clothing appropriate for the known hazards of that particular emergency operation is worn.

(d) The employer must ensure that appropriate protective clothing protects the head, body, and extremities. It must consist of at least the following components: foot and leg protection, hand protection, body protection, and eye, face, and head protection.

(12) Body Protection. To ensure full body protection for the wearer coats and trousers used by structural fire fighters shall be at least equivalent to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standard, No. 1971, 1991 edition, entitled “Protective Clothing for Structural Fire Fighting.” (See also Appendix A.)

(13) Head Protection.

(a) Head protection must consist of a protective head device, ear protection, flaps, and chin strap, which meet the requirements of NFPA Standard 1971-2000, Protective Ensemble for Structural Fire Fighting.

(b) Use, care, alterations, and maintenance instructions for protective headgear must be supplied for each helmet.

(c) Care, maintenance, and alteration of helmets must conform to the manufacturer’s recommendations.

(d) During structural fire fighting helmet accessories designed to provide or maintain protection from health and safety hazards must be worn in the manufacturer’s recommended position. (See also Appendix A.)

(e) A flame-resistant protective hood that will not adversely affect the seal of a respirator facepiece and meeting the requirements of NFPA Standard 1971, 1996 edition, must be worn during interior structural fire fighting operations to protect the sides of the face and hair.

(14) Hand Protection. Hand protection for fire fighting activities must consist of protective gloves or glove system that will provide protection against cut, puncture, and heat penetration. Gloves or glove system must meet the requirements of NFPA Standard 1973, 1988 edition, titled “Gloves for Structural Fire Fighting.”

(15) Foot and Leg Protection.

(a) Foot and leg protection must meet the requirements of OAR 437-002-0182(15)(a)(A) and (B) and may be achieved by either of the following methods:

(A) Fully extended boots, which provide protection for the legs; or

(B) Protective shoes or boots worn in combination with protective trousers that meet the requirements of OAR 437-002-0182(12).

(b) Protective footwear must meet the requirements of NAPA Standard 1971, 1996 edition, titled “Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting.”

(c) Fire fighters’ boots may be resoled but must meet the requirements of this rule.

(16) Eye and Face Protection. Eye and face protection worn by fire fighters at the fire ground must comply with the following regulations:

(a) General requirements. Face protection must be required where there is a reasonable probability of injury that can be prevented by such protection. When such face protection does not protect the eyes from foreign objects, additional eye protection must be provided.

(b) When self-contained respiratory equipment is being used by fire fighters, additional eye and face protection will not be required. Employers must make conveniently available a type of protection suitable for the work performed, and employees must use such protectors. Protectors must meet the following minimum requirements.

(A) They must provide adequate protection against the particular hazards for which they are designed.

(B) They must be reasonably comfortable when worn under the designated conditions.

(C) They must be durable.

(D) They must be capable of being disinfected.

(E) They must be easy to clean.

(F) Protectors that can be worn over corrective lenses must be available for those who need them, and should be kept clean and in good repair.

(c) Face shields.

(A) Face shields must be clear transparent or colored transparent.

(B) Disinfection. When a person is assigned protective equipment, this equipment must be cleaned and disinfected regularly.

(C) Face shields must be an integral part of the fire helmet and may be installed in a fixed position or hinged allowing adjustment of the shields.

(D) In the event a breathing apparatus within a face mask is being used, the face mask will be considered an acceptable face shield.

(d) Goggles, flexible, or cushioned fitting. Goggles must consist of a fully flexible frame, a lens holder or a rigid frame with integral lens or lenses, and a separate cushioned fitting surface on the full periphery of the facial contact area.

(A) Materials used must be chemical-resistant, nontoxic, nonirritating and slow-burning.

(B) There must be support on the face, such as an adjustable headband of suitable material or other appropriate support to hold the frame comfortably and snugly in front of the eyes.

(e) Design, construction, testing, and use of eye and face protection must be according to ANSI Z87.1, Occupational Eye and Face Protection (1979).

NOTE: Fire fighters must be protected from noise that exceeds the levels deemed safe in OAR 437, Division 2/G, 1910.95, Occupational Noise Exposure.

(17) Requirements for Respiratory Protection. See OAR 437, Division 2/I, 1910.134, Respiratory Protection.

(18) Criteria for Approved Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus.

(a) All compressed air cylinders used with self-contained breathing apparatus must meet Department Of Transportation and NIOSH criteria. In emergency and lifesaving situations, approved self-contained compressed-air breathing apparatus may be used with approved cylinders from other approved self-contained compressed-air breathing apparatus provided that such cylinders are of the same capacity and pressure rating. Once the emergency is over, return SCBA’s to their original approved condition.

(b) Self-contained breathing apparatus must be provided with an indicator that automatically sounds an alarm when the remaining air supply of the apparatus is reduced to within a range of 20 to 25 percent of its rated service time.

(19) (Reserved)

(20) Personal Alert Safety System (PASS). Each member involved in rescue, fire suppression, or other hazardous duties, must be provided with and must use a PASS device in the hazardous area when self-contained breathing apparatus is in use. PASS devices must meet the requirements of NFPA 1982, Standard on Personal Alert Safety Systems for Fire Fighters. Each PASS device must be tested at least monthly and must be maintained according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

(21) (Reserved)

(22) (Reserved)

(23) (Reserved)

(24) Breathing Air Compressors and Cylinders. In addition to the requirements contained in 1910.134(i), air samples must be taken every six months from the compressor and analyzed by the employer or an independent laboratory for Grade D breathing air. Air samples must also be tested when the system is installed or repaired. Analysis must be conducted according to ANSI/CGA Standard G7.1-1989 edition, Commodity Specification for Air.

(25) Identification of Hazardous Material Locations.

(a) A means must be provided for identifying nonresidential premises where hazardous materials are stored, as defined in the Uniform Fire Code, 1991 edition, Articles 4 and 80, and in quantities as set forth in the hazardous material permit required by Article 4 of the Uniform Fire Code.

(b) Hazardous chemicals required to be identified defined in Article 9, Section 9.110, and Article 80, Section 80.101 of the Uniform Fire Code.

(26) Hazardous Material Response Plan.

(a) Fire departments that expect or plan to respond to hazardous material incidents must develop a written response plan.

(b) The written response plan must contain the policies and procedures on:

(A) Pre-emergency planning and coordination with outside parties,

(B) Personnel roles, lines of authority, training, and communication,

(C) Emergency recognition and prevention,

(D) Safe distances,

(E) Scene security and control,

(F) Evacuation procedures,

(G) Decontamination,

(H) Emergency medical treatment and first aid,

(I) Personnel withdrawal procedures,

(J) Critique of response and follow-up,

(K) Personal protective equipment and emergency equipment and response procedures.

(c) The incident commander must be responsible for:

(A) Identifying the hazardous substance and condition,

(B) Implementing emergency operations,

(C) Ensuring personal protective equipment is worn,

(D) Limiting access of hot zone to those with a specific mission assignment,

(E) Implementing decontamination procedures,

(F) Designating a safety officer,

(G) Using appropriately trained personnel,

(H) Providing on-scene medical surveillance for emergency responders.

FIRE FIGHTING APPARATUS

(27) Fire Apparatus Area.

(a) Walkways around apparatus must be kept free of obstructions.

(b) The station’s apparatus floors must be kept free of grease, oil, and tripping hazards.

(c) Class I or II flammable liquids must not be used to remove grease or dirt from apparatus.

(d) Exhaust gases from diesel or gasoline apparatus within buildings must be maintained within the limits of OAR 437, Division 2/Z, OAR 437-002-0382, Oregon Air Contaminant Rules.

(28) Design and Construction of Fire Apparatus.

(a) All fire apparatus with the exception of specialized apparatus must conform to OAR 437, Division 2/N, Oregon Rules for Commercial and Industrial Vehicles.

(b) Employers who have purchased used fire apparatus or used military equipment prior to the effective date of this division are not required to bring them under a more stringent code than the one in force at the time the apparatus was manufactured. The exception to this rule is regarding seat belts and communication systems between the tailboard and driver compartment as required by OAR 437-002-0182(29) (Automotive Fire Apparatus Equipment) and roll bars on all open top off-road vehicles as required by OAR 437-002-0182(28)(f).

(c) Fire fighters’ vehicle tailboards must not project out of the vehicle sides or fenders and must be designed to provide safe footing.

(d) Exhaust systems must be installed and properly maintained and must be designed to minimize the exposure of exhaust gases by the fire fighter.

(e) The loaded gross weight and empty height of the vehicle must be posted in the vehicle such that it can be clearly read by the driver.

(f) Roll bars must be in place on all open top off-road vehicles for rollover protection.

(29) Automotive Fire Apparatus Equipment.

(a) All equipment on a vehicle must be adequately secured when the vehicle is in motion.

(b) Workers being transported by fire department vehicles must ride only in designated secure positions. Safety restraints must be provided for fire fighters riding the tailboard. (See also OAR 437, Division 2/N, Oregon Rules for Commercial and Industrial Vehicles.)

(c) Vehicles with obstructed view to the rear of the vehicle when backing, must be equipped with:

(A) An automatic back-up alarm that must sound when backing; or

(B) A fire fighter, who is visible in the driver’s left-side mirror, must stand to the rear of the truck to guide the driver while backing.

(d) Fire fighting vehicles must come to a full stop before workers disembark.

(e) If workers are required to ride the tailboard, an electrical signal system or voice communication system must be installed between the tailboard and the driver’s compartment. A code of signals must be used for controlling the movement of the vehicle.

(f) When traffic flow is inhibited, vehicles equipped with emergency warning lights must be used to control traffic at emergency scenes. The use of traffic cones, fire department personnel, police, or other traffic control measures must be used as soon as practical.

(30) Automotive Apparatus Maintenance and Repair. Each employer must establish written records and procedures whereby apparatus has:

(a) A scheduled monthly maintenance check; or

(b) A maintenance check each time the apparatus is returned following an emergency response, drill, or test drive.

(31) Tires. Tires that are excessively worn, cracked, deteriorated or damaged in any way must not be used. All tires must have a minimum tread depth of 2/32-inch.

(32) Aerial Devices.

(a) Aerial devices used for fire fighting must be inspected and tested by a person competent in performing such tests and inspections according to the recommendations of NFPA Standard 1914, 1991 edition, at least annually.

(b) Where defects are found in critical components of an aerial device, the repairs must be tested and certified according to NFPA Standard 1914, 1991 edition, by a registered professional engineer or manufacturer of the apparatus or an American Welding Society (AWS) Certified Welding Inspector. A permanent record of such tests and repairs must be maintained for each unit.

HOSE DRYING AND DRILL TOWERS

(33) Hose Drying Towers.

(a) Floor openings on hose tower platforms must be equipped with a guardrail meeting the requirements of OAR 437, Division 2/D, 1910.23, Guarding Floor and Wall Openings and Holes.

(b) The toeboard requirements for elevated work platforms in hose drying towers must not apply unless hand tools or objects other than hoses are carried onto the platforms.

(c) The requirements for ladders must meet the requirements of OAR 437, Division 2/D, 437-002-0027, Fixed Ladders.

(d) Ropes used to hoist hose in the hose towers must have a breaking strength to safe load strength (rated working load) ratio of 3 to 1.

(34) Drill Towers. Permanent fixed ladders on the outside of drill towers and drill buildings are exempt from the requirements of offset platform landings and ladder cage guards.

FIRE SERVICE EQUIPMENT

(35) Testing, Maintenance and Inspection of Fire Service Equipment. The employer must maintain and inspect fire service equipment at least annually and perform any tests recommended by the manufacturers at the date of manufacture, or the recommendations of NFPA or IFSTA.

(36) Confined Space Rescue

(a) Employers subject to this section must comply with 1910.146 for their own confined spaces.

(b) Employers subject to this section must comply with 1910.146(k)(2) when they agree to serve as a designated rescue service provider.

(c) Employers subject to this section that will respond to emergency calls for rescue from confined spaces must:

(A) Train responders to recognize inherent confined space hazards before assigning or attempting any related duties in confined space rescues.

(i) Provide responders with understanding, knowledge, and skills necessary for safe performance of confined space rescues.

(ii) Practice a confined space rescue operation at least once every year from a real or simulated confined space.

(B) Certify responders in writing to Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) Fire Fighter 1 levels or equivalent.

(C) Use the Incident Management System during confined space rescue incidents that meet the requirements of the NFPA Standard 1561, Fire Department Incident Management.

(D) Assess the situation and determine if it qualifies as a confined space incident.

(i) Classify the operation as a rescue or body recovery.

(ii) Assess and secure physical hazards related to the incident or rescue.

(iii) Assess atmospheric hazards.

(I) Use calibrated direct-reading instruments to test the atmosphere in confined spaces for oxygen content, flammable gases and vapors, and toxic air contaminates.

(II) When calibrated direct-reading instruments are not available, the Incident Commander must assume the situation is immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH) and assure that responders who enter are equipped with appropriate respiratory protective equipment.

(iv) Determine if the space should be ventilated.

(E) Provide the appropriate rescue, emergency, and personal protective equipment for safe entry into and rescue from confined spaces.

(F) Provide necessary equipment to facilitate non-entry retrieval for responders, unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk or would not contribute to the rescue operations.

[ED. NOTE: Appendices referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 10-1993, f. 7-29-93, cert. ef. 9-15-93; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 2-2000, f. & cert. ef. 1-28-00; OSHA 12-2001, f. & cert. ef. 10-26-01; OSHA 3-2005, f. & cert. ef. 6-10-05; OSHA 9-2008, f. 9-19-08, cert. ef. 1-1-09; OSHA 8-2009, f. 7-9-09, cert. ef. 10-1-09; OSHA 1-2012, f. & cert .ef. 4-10-12; OSHA 6-2012, f. 9-28-12, cert. ef. 4-1-13

437-002-0256

Stationary Compactors, Self-Contained Compactors and Balers.

This applies to all stationary compactors, self-contained compactors, and balers.

You must comply with:

Subdivision 2/D Walking/Working Surfaces, for ladders, stairs and other walking/working surfaces.

Subdivision 2/J 1910.147, Control of Hazardous Energy, for maintenance, servicing, and repair activities.

Subdivision 2/J 437-002-0146 Confined Spaces for confined space hazards.

Subdivision 2/O Machine Guarding for any guarding hazard not covered in these rules.

YOUR RESPONSIBILITY:

To protect employees from hazards associated with stationary compactors, self-contained compactors, and balers.

Operators and other employees

(1) You must:

Train and supervise equipment operators. Training must include information from the operation manual, when available, and these rules.

Document the name(s) of the trainer and trainees along with the date of the training.

Provide supervision to ensure employees follow correct operating procedures.

Instruct all employees how to identify and report exposure to hazards.

Prohibit wearing loose clothing, jewelry, or long loose hair that can become entangled in the equipment.

Installation, inspection and maintenance

(2) You must:

Install the equipment according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Keep the equipment in safe working order.

Maintain the equipment according to manufacturer’s recommendations when available.

Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for inspecting and testing. If there are no manufacturer’s recommendations available, inspect and test annually.

Keep a record of inspections for a minimum of two years.

Make sure that modifications do not diminish the original level of safety.

Add safety precautions, resulting from modifications, to the operation manual, when available, and to the training information.

Not allow the use of damaged, malfunctioning, or defective equipment.

Ensure only qualified employees, trained and authorized by your management, or authorized service technicians are allowed to maintain and repair the equipment. Qualified employees must demonstrate a proficiency in maintaining and repairing the equipment.

Guard moving parts

(3) You must:

Have guards that prevent body parts from getting caught by moving parts during the equipment’s cycle.

Use sustained manual pressure controls when not using point of operation guarding.

Make certain the point of operation is visible to the operator when using sustained manual pressure controls.

Make sure the equipment manufactured with interlocks will not function with the gate or door open.

Controls

(4) You must:

Clearly label the function of each control.

Make sure controls are not subject to unintentional activation.

Have stop controls that are red, a different size than other controls, and not recessed.

Keep emergency stop controls readily accessible to the operator, or within 3 feet of the operating feed area or chute opening at equipment location.

Provide a way to stop the complete operation of the baler or compactor at any point in the cycle.

Require horizontal balers equipped with an automatic start, to have a minimum 5-second audible and visual warning when the startup control is activated. Before the main motor starts, there must be visual warning lasting for not less than 10 additional seconds.

No alarm or delay is required when the horizontal baler is restarting from sleep mode.

Access points for Maintenance or Repairs

(5) You must:

Make sure access covers

Have functional interlocks or locks that require hand tools for removal.

Have warning signs on compactors that read:

Restricted Area, Authorized Employees Only,

Warning – Stand Clear When Tailgate or Container is in Motion and During Loading and Unloading,

Warning – This Compactor Starts Automatically,

Warning – Gate Must Be Closed Before Operating This Compactor.

Have warning signs on balers that read:

CAUTION – Stand clear When Bale is Ejected,

WARNING – This Baler Starts Automatically,

DANGER – High Voltage,

DANGER – Disconnect and Lock Out Power Before Opening This Panel

Replace missing or defaced signs.

Note: Additional sign requirements are in ANSI Z245-2-1997 7.10 compactors and ANSI Z245.5 –1997 5.1.6. balers.

Immediate work area

(6) You must:

Not allow clutter or waste material that causes a safety hazard or obstructs safe operation to accumulate around the operator station.

Include warning signs at all loading points and the point of operation on automatic cycling equipment indicating that the baler or compactor starts automatically.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: APD 22-1988, f. 12-30-88, cert. ef. 1-1-89; OSHA 6-1994, f. & cert. ef. 9-30-94, Renumbered from 437-002-0242(1); OSHA 7-2009, f. 7-7-09, cert. ef. 7-21-09; OSHA 6-2012, f. 9-28-12, cert. ef. 4-1-13

437-002-0300

Adoption by Reference

In addition to and not in lieu of, any other health and safety codes contained in OAR Chapter 437, the Department adopts by reference the following federal regulations printed as part of the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910, in the Federal Register:

(1) Reserved for 29 CFR 1910.261 Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills

(2) 29 CFR 1910.262 Textiles, published 6/18/98, FR vol. 63, no. 117, p. 33467.

(3) 29 CFR 1910.263 Bakery Equipment, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9241.

(4) 29 CFR 1910.264 Laundry Machinery and Operations, published 11/7/78, FR vol. 43, p. 51760.

(5) 29 CFR 1910.265 Sawmills, published 9/13/05, FR vol. 70, no. 176, p. 53925.

(6) Reserved for 29 CFR 1910.266 Pulpwood Logging.

(NOTE: In Oregon, Pulpwood Logging rules are Oregon-initiated rules provided in Division 7, Forest Activities.)

(7) Reserved for 29 CFR 1910.267 Agricultural Operations

(8) 29 CFR 1910.268 Telecommunications, published 6/18/98, FR vol. 63, no. 117, p. 33467.

(9) 29 CFR 1910.269 Electric power generation, transmission and distribution, published amended with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 6-2012, f. 9/28/12, ef. 4/1/13.

(10) 29 CFR 1910.272 Grain Handling Facilities, and Appendices A, B and C, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9242.

(11) 29 CFR 1910.274 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9242.

(12) 29 CFR 1910.275 Removed. Published 3/7/96, Federal Register, vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9242.

NOTE: These standards are available from the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (OR-OSHA), Department of Consumer and Business Services; and the United States Government Printing Office.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: APD 10-1988, f. & ef. 7-7-88; OSHA 23-1990, f. 9-28-90, ef. 12-1-90; OSHA 27-1990, f. 12-12-90, ef. 2-1-91; OSHA 14-1991, f. 10-10-91, cert. ef. 11-1-91; OSHA 7-1993, f. 6-8-93, cert. ef. 8-1-93; OSHA 11-1993, f. 8-4-93, cert. ef. 10-1-93; OSHA 3-1994, f. & cert. ef. 8-1-94; OSHA 6-1995, f. 4-18-95, cert. ef. 6-1-95; OSHA 3-1996, f. & cert. ef. 7-22-96; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 3-1998, f. & cert. ef. 7-7-98; OSHA 2-1999, f. & cert. ef. 4-30-99; OSHA 3-1999, f. & cert. ef. 4-30-99; OSHA 5-2001, f. & cert. ef. 4-6-01; OSHA 4-2004, f. & cert. ef. 9-15-04; OSHA 4-2005, f. & cert. ef 12-14-05; OSHA 1-2012, f. & cert .ef. 4-10-12; OSHA 6-2012, f. 9-28-12, cert. ef. 4-1-13

437-002-0312

Oregon Rules for Pulp, Paper and Paperboard Mills

(1) General Requirements.

(a) Application. This section applies to establishments where pulp, paper, and paperboard are manufactured or converted. This section does not apply to logging and the transportation of logs to pulp, paper, and paperboard mills.

(b) Standards incorporated by reference. Standards covering issues of occupational safety and health which have general application without regard to any specific industry are incorporated by reference in sections (2) through (14) of this rule and in subsections (c) and (d) of this rule and made applicable under this rule. Such standards shall be construed according to the rules set forth in §1910.5, Applicability of Standards, in Subdivision A.

(c) General incorporation of standards. Establishments subject to this section shall comply with the following standards of the American National Standards Institute:

(A) Safety Requirements for Floor and Wall Openings, Railings, and Toeboards, A10.18-1983.

(B) Scheme for the Identification of Piping Systems, A13.1-1981 (R1993).

(C) Safety Code for Portable Wood Ladders, A14.1-1990.

(D) Safety Code for Portable Metal Ladders, A14.2-1990.

(E) Safety Code for Fixed Ladders, A14.3-1990.

(F) Safety Code for Cranes, Derricks, and Hoists, B30.2-1990.

(G) Overhead and Gantry Cranes, B30.17-1992.

(H) Crawler, Locomotive, and Truck Cranes, B30.8-1993.

(I) Safety Code for Woodworking Machinery, ANSI O1.1-1992.

(J) Method of Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors – Physical Attenuation of Ear Muffs, ANSI S3.19-1974 (R1990).

(K) Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection, ANSI Z87.1-1989.

(L) Requirements for Sanitation in Places of Employment, ANSI Z4.1-1986.

(M) Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems, Z9.2-1979 (R 1991).

(N) Practices for Respiratory Protection, ANSI Z88.2-1992.

(O) Safety Requirements for Industrial Head Protection, ANSI Z89.1-1986.

(P) Safety Color Code, ANSI Z535.1-1991.

(Q) Practice for the Inspection of Elevators (Inspector’s Manual), ANSI/ASME A17.2-1988.

(R) Safety Code for Elevators, Dumbwaiters, and Moving Walks, ANSI/ASME A17.1-1990.

(S) Safety Code for Mechanical Power-Transmission Apparatus, ANSI/ASME B15.1-1992.

(T) Safety Code for Conveyors, Cableways, and Related Equipment, ANSI/ASME B20.1- 1993.

(U) Power Piping, ANSI/ASME B31.1-1992.

(V) Safety Code for Powered Industrial Trucks, ANSI/ASME B56.1.

(W) Practice for Industrial Lighting, ANSI/IES RP-990.

(X) Installation of Blower and Exhaust Systems for Dust, Stock, and Vapor Removal or Conveying, ANSI/NFPA 91-1992.

(Y) Fire Department Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus Program, ANSI/NFPA 1404-1989.

(Z) Safety Code for Ventilation and Operation of Open-Surface Tanks, ANSI/UL 641-1985.

(d) Other standards. The following standards shall be considered standards under this section:

(A) ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Unfired Pressure Vessels 1992, including addenda.

(B) Building Exits Code for Life Safety from Fire, NFPA 101-1991.

(C) NFPA Code for Prevention of Sulfur Fires and Explosions, NFPA 655-1993.

(D) Safety in the Transportation, Storage, Handling and Use of Explosives, IME Pamphlet No. 17, March 1987, Institute of Makers of Explosives.

(2) Employee Training.

(a) Employees shall not be permitted to operate any machine or equipment until they have received proper training and are familiar with safe operating procedures.

(b) Employees shall be trained in proper lifting or moving techniques and methods. Mechanical devices should be used or employees should ask for assistance in lifting or moving heavy objects.

(c) In each area where hazardous substances may be encountered, personnel shall be trained to cope with emergencies arising from breaks, ruptures, or spills which would create a hazardous condition.

(d) Any faulty equipment or hazardous condition shall be promptly reported to the person in charge.

(e) When an employee is assigned to work alone in a remote or isolated area, a system shall be instituted whereby such employee reports to someone or a designated person shall check on his or her safety. The procedure shall designate the method of contact and the frequency. All persons will be trained on the procedures.

(3) Safe Practices.

(a) Guards. All driving mechanisms, power transmission apparatus, and prime movers shall be constructed, guarded, and used in conformity with Subdivision O, Machinery and Machine Guarding.

(b) Inspection of controls and safety devices. Brakes, back stops, antirunaway devices, overload releases, and other safety devices shall be inspected and tested frequently to insure that all are operative and maintained in good repair.

(c) Personal protective clothing and equipment. Personal protective clothing and equipment shall be provided and worn in accordance with Subdivision I, Personal Protective Equipment. Respiratory protection must conform to the requirements of §1910.134 of Subdivision I.

(d) Floors and platforms. Floors, platforms, and work surfaces shall be guarded and maintained in accordance with §1910.23, in Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(e) Lockouts. Lockout/tagout shall be in accordance with the requirements of §1910.147, in Subdivision J, with the exception that:

(A) There will be no tagouts allowed in lieu of lockout for that which can be locked out. Tags are provided for identification and information purposes only.

(B) Persons engaged in repair, inspection, maintenance, or clean-up shall lockout the affected equipment, retain possession of the keys to the locks, and personally remove the lock and tag upon completion of the work.

(C) Group lockout. (See Appendices A and B.)

(i) When servicing and/or maintenance is performed by a crew, craft, department or other group, they shall utilize a procedure which affords the employees a level of protection equivalent to that provided by the implementation of a personal lockout device.

(ii) Group lockout devices shall be used in accordance with the procedures required by §1910.147(c)(4) including, but not necessarily limited to, the following specific requirements.

(I) Primary responsibility is vested in an authorized employee for a set number of employees working under the protection of a group lockout device (such as an operations lock);

(II) Provision for the authorized employee to ascertain the exposure status of individual group members with regard to the lockout of the machine or equipment; and

(III) When more than one crew, craft, department, etc. is involved, assignment or overall job-associated lockout control responsibility to an authorized employee designated to coordinate affected work forces and ensure continuity of protection; and

(IV) Each authorized employee shall affix a personal lockout device to the group lock-out device, group lockbox, or comparable mechanism when he or she begins work, and shall remove those devices when he or she stops working on the machine or equipment being serviced or maintained; and

(V) Any person involved in the lockout process shall have the right to place their own lock at each lockout location where group lockout procedures have been allowed.

(f) Confined space entry. Confined space entry shall be in accordance with 437-002-0146 Confined Spaces, in Subdivision J.

(g) Industrial power trucks.

(A) All industrial power trucks and operations shall conform to §1910.178, Powered Industrial Trucks, Subdivision N, Material Handling and Storage. All forklift trucks shall be provided with overhead guards. Design requirements shall provide protection for the liquid petroleum gas tank. All guards shall be designed in compliance with §1910.178, Powered Industrial Trucks, in Subdivision N.

(B) Mirrors or other methods to ensure visibility shall be installed at blind corners or intersections which will allow operators to observe oncoming traffic.

(C) Every power truck operated from an end platform or standing position shall be equipped with a platform extending beyond the operator’s position, strong enough to withstand a compression load equal to the weight of the loaded vehicle applied along the longitudinal axis of the truck with the outermost projection of the platform against the flat vertical surface.

(D) Pushing of vehicles or rail cars with the forks or clamps of a lift truck is prohibited.

(h) Emergency lighting.

(A) Emergency lighting shall be provided wherever it is necessary for employees to remain at their machines or stations to shut down equipment in case of power failure. Emergency lighting shall be provided at stairways and passageways or aisleways used by employees for emergency exit in case of power failure. Emergency lighting shall be provided in all plant first aid and medical facilities.

(B) Emergency lighting shall be maintained in accordance with the manufacturer or engineering specifications, and shall be checked at least every 30 days for defects.

(i) Electrical equipment. All electrical installations and electrical utilization equipment shall comply with the National Electrical Code requirements and the provisions of Subdivision S, Electrical.

(4) Handling and Storage of Pulpwood and Pulp Chips.

(a) Handling pulpwood with forklift trucks. Where large forklift trucks, or lift trucks with clam-jaws, are used in the yard, the operator’s enclosed cab shall be provided with an escape hatch, whenever the hydraulic arm blocks escape through the side doors.

(b) Handling pulpwood with cranes or stackers.

(A) Where locomotive cranes are used for loading or unloading pulpwood, the pulpwood shall be piled so as to allow a clearance of not less than 24 inches between the pile and the end of the cab of any locomotive crane in use, when the cab is turned in any working position.

(B) The minimum distance of the pulpwood pile from the centerline of a standard-gage track shall be maintained at not less than 8-1/2 feet.

(C) Logs shall be piled in an orderly and stable manner, with no projection into walkways or roadways.

(D) Rail cars shall not be spotted on tracks adjacent to the locomotive cranes unless a 24 inch clearance is maintained, as required in section (4)(b)(A) of this rule.

(E) The handling and storage of other materials shall conform to sections (4)(b)(A) and (B) of this rule with respect to clearance.

(F) Equipment and practices shall conform to American National Standards B30.2-1990 and B30.2.0-1967.

(G) Personal protective equipment for such uses as foot, head, and eye protection shall be required for workers on a job basis.

(H) No person shall be permitted to walk beneath a suspended load, bucket, or hook.

(c) Pulpwood storage and handling.

(A) Unauthorized vehicles and unauthorized foot traffic shall not be allowed in any active sorting, storing, loading, or unloading areas.

(B) Unloading lines shall be so arranged that it is not necessary for the workers to attach them on the pond or dump side of the load.

(C) Jackets or vests of fluorescent or other high visibility material shall be worn by persons working on dry land log storage.

(D) Wire rope doglines used for towing or rafting shall not be used when:

(i) They acquire jaggers to the extent that they present a hazard to the workers handling them; or

(ii) When they are weakened to the extent that they are hazardous.

(E) Boom sticks shall be capable of safely supporting the weight imposed upon them.

(F) Stiff booms shall be made by fastening not less than two boom sticks together. The width of the stiff boom shall be not less than 36 inches measured from outside to outside of the outer logs. The boom sticks shall be fastened together with not less than 4-inch by 6-inch cross ties or cable lashing properly recessed into notches in the boom sticks and secured.

(G) Pike poles shall be kept in good repair. Conductive pike poles shall not be used where it is possible that they may come in contact with electrical conductors.

(H) All log dumps shall be periodically cleared of bark and other debris.

(I) When cutting bands on bundled logs, workers shall position themselves in a safe location. Double-bitted axes shall not be used for cutting bands. Caution shall be used to prevent being struck by ends of bands being cut and, if needed, personal protective equipment shall be worn.

(J) Storing or sorting on water, or any boom work other than boom boat operations, shall require a minimum of two persons.

(d) Handling pulpwood from ships.

(A) Ladders and gangplanks with railings to boat docks shall meet the requirements of American National Standards A10.18-1983, A14.1-1990, A14.2-1990, and A14.3-1990, and shall be securely fastened in place.

(B) The hatch tender shall be required to signal the hoisting engineer to move the load only after the employees working in the hold are in the clear.

(C) The air in the ship’s hold, tanks, or closed vessels shall be tested for oxygen deficiency and for toxic, explosive and combustible gases and vapors.

(e) Handling pulpwood from flatcars and all other rail cars.

(A) Railroad flatcars for the conveyance of pulpwood loaded parallel to the length of the car shall be equipped with safety-stake pockets.

(B) Where pulpwood is loaded crosswise on a flatcar sufficient stakes of sizes not smaller than 4 by 4 inches shall be used to prevent the load from shifting.

(C) When it is necessary to cut stakes, those on the unloading side should be partially cut through first, and then the binder wires cut on the opposite side. Wire cutters equipped with long extension handles shall be used. No person shall be permitted along the dumping side of the car after the stakes have been cut.

(D) When steel straps without stakes are used, the steel straps shall be cut from a safe area to prevent employees from being struck by the falling logs.

(E) Flatcars and all other cars shall be chocked during unloading. Where equipment is not provided with hand brakes, rail clamping chocks shall be used.

(F) A derail shall be used to prevent movement of other rail equipment into cars where persons are working.

(f) Handling pulpwood from trucks.

(A) Cutting of stakes and binder wires shall be done in accordance with section (4)(e)(C) of this rule.

(B) Where binder chain and steel stakes are used, the binder chains shall be released and the stakes tripped from the opposite side of the load spillage.

(C) Where binder chains and crane slings are used, the crane slings shall be attached and taut before the binder chains are released. The hooker shall see that the helper is clear before signaling for the movement of the load.

(D) The truck driver shall leave the truck cab and be in the clear, in a designated area, and shall be in clear view of the unloading equipment operator while the unloader is approaching the loaded truck.

(E) The truck driver shall remain outside the cab and clear of the load while logs are being unloaded except that, after a complete load is lifted as a unit and held stationary, the driver may enter the cab and drive forward from under the suspended load.

(F) Log unloaders shall not be moved about the premises with loads raised higher than absolutely necessary.

(g) Handling pulp chips from rail cars.

(A) All cars shall be securely fastened in place and all employees in the clear before dumping is started.

(B) Personal protective equipment for such uses as foot, head, and eye protection shall be provided, and employees shall wear the equipment when working in the woodyard. Ear protection shall be provided when the noise level may be harmful.

(C) When a rollover-type unloading device is used for removing chips from cars, the cars shall be properly secured in place, and all employees shall be in the clear before dumping operation is started.

(h) Handling pulp chips and hog fuel from trucks and trailers.

(A) All trucks and trailers shall be secure and all employees in the clear before dumping is started.

(B) Personal protective equipment necessary to protect workers from hazards shall be provided and worn.

(C) Elevating platform-type or cable-lift type unloading devices shall have adequate back bumper stops.

(D) Side rails or other positive means to prevent the truck and/or trailer from falling shall be used while unloading the single trailer units.

(E) All persons shall be clear of all hoisting or elevating mechanisms before dumping commences.

(F) No person shall remain in any truck while the truck is being elevated.

(G) A safe area and suitable device shall be provided for the chip tester to use while taking chip samples.

(H) Rolled chip nets shall not be positioned where they cover the ladders on rail cars or trucks.

(I) Chip and hog fuel storage.

(i) When mobile equipment is used on top of hog fuel or chip piles, a roll-over protection system shall be installed on the equipment. If the cab is of the enclosed type, windshield wipers shall be installed.

(ii) Hog fuel bins shall be provided with standard railed platform or walkways near the top or other equally effective means shall be provided for use by employees engaged in dislodging hog fuel.

(iii) Extreme care shall be taken to prevent chips or hog fuel from creating an overhang or bridging.

(iv) Employees shall be prohibited from working under overhangs or bridges.

(J) Chip and sawdust bins. Steam or compressed-air lances, or other facilities, shall be used for breaking down the arches caused by jamming in chip lofts. No worker shall be permitted to enter a bin unless done in accordance with 437-002-0146 Confined Spaces, in Subdivision J.

(i) Crane operations.

(A) Crane boom and load capacities as specified by the manufacturer shall be posted in the cab of the crane in accordance with §1910.180, Crawler, Locomotive and Truck Cranes, in Subdivision N, Material Handling and Storage.

(B) A safety device such as a heavy chain or cable at least equal in strength to the lifting cables shall be fastened to the boom and to the frame of the boom crane (if it is other than locomotive) at the base. Alternatively, a telescoping safety device shall be fastened to the boom and to the cab frame, so as to prevent the boom from snapping back over the cab in the event of lifting cable breakage.

(C) A crane shall not be operated where any part thereof may come within 10 feet of overhead powerlines (or other overhead obstructions) unless the powerlines have been de-energerized, or clearances are maintained as specified in §1910.303, General Requirements, in Subdivision S, Electrical.

(D) Standard signals for the operation of cranes shall be established for all movements of the crane, in accordance with American National Standards B30.2-1990 and B30.8-1988.

(E) Only one member of the crew shall be authorized to give signals to the crane operator.

(F) All cranes shall be equipped with a suitable warning device such as a horn or whistle.

(G) A sheave guard shall be provided beneath the head sheave of the boom.

(H) Grapples, tongs, and buckets shall not be left suspended when not in use.

(j) Traffic warning signs or signals.

(A) A flagger shall direct the movement of cranes or locomotives being moved across railroad tracks or roads, and at any points where the vision of the operator is restricted. The flagger must always remain in sight of the operator when the crane or locomotive is in motion. The blue flag policy shall be used to mark stationary cars day and night. This policy shall include marking the track in advance of the spotted cars (flag for daytime, light for darkness).

(B) After cars are spotted for loading or unloading, warning flags or signs shall be placed in the center of the track at least 50 feet away from the cars and a derail set to protect workers in or on the car.

(k) Rail car operations and railroad warning devices.

(A) On a dead end spur, a blue signal may be displayed adjacent to the switch opening while cars are being loaded or unloaded. When such warning devices are displayed, the equipment shall not be coupled to or moved.

(B) Equipment which would obscure the blue signal shall not be placed on the track.

(C) Each maintenance crew shall display and remove its own set of blue signals.

(D) A flashing warning light or other device shall be installed near any opening which leads to a passageway crossing railroad tracks adjacent to the building. Such light or device shall be activated prior to any switching or movement of railroad equipment to warn workers of the dangerous condition in the area.

(E) Workers shall not crawl under or pass between coupled rail cars to cross tracks.

(F) An audible whistle, horn, or bell shall be sounded by the locomotive engineer to give adequate warning prior to switching across any road crossing.

(G) When switching railroad equipment in congested areas or across roadways or walkways, “flying switches” shall be prohibited.

(H) All freight car doors shall be inspected before workers open or close them. A safe method shall be used to open or close the door.

(l) Illumination. Artificial illumination shall be provided when loading or unloading is performed after dark, in accordance with American National Standard ANSI/IES-RP-1990, Practice for Industrial Lighting.

(m) Bridge or dock plates.

(A) The construction and use of bridge or dock plates shall conform to requirements of §1910.30(a), Walking-Working Surfaces, in Subdivision D.

(B) The sides of bridge or dock plates shall have an upturn or lip of at least 4 inches covering the area between the edge of the loading dock and edge of car or truck floor whenever the distance exceeds 18 inches to prevent wheeled equipment from running off the sides.

(C) Bridge or dock plates shall have at least 6 inches bearing surface on the loading dock.

(D) Bridge or dock plates intended to be moved by mechanized equipment shall be designed for this purpose or attachments for safe handling shall be used.

(n) Hand tools. Handles of wood hooks shall be locked to the shank to prevent them from rotating.

(o) Removal of pulpwood.

(A) The ends of a woodpile shall be properly sloped and cross-tiered into the pile. Upright poles shall not be used at the ends of woodpiles. To knock down wood from the woodpile, mechanical equipment shall be used to permit employees to keep in the clear of loosened wood.

(B) If dynamite is used to loosen the pile, only authorized personnel shall be permitted to handle and discharge the explosive. An electric detonator is preferable for firing; if a fuse is used, it shall be an approved safety fuse with a burning rate of not less than 120 seconds per yard and a minimum length of 3 feet, in accordance with “Safety in the Transportation, Storage, Handling and Use of Explosives”, IME Pamphlet No. 17, March 1987.

(p) Log hauls, slips and carriages.

(A) Controls shall be arranged to operate from a position where the operator will at all times be in the clear of logs, machinery, lines, and rigging.

(B) Controls shall be marked to indicate their function.

(C) An effective method of disengaging the head rig saws from the power unit shall be installed on all head rigs where the power unit is not directly controlled by the sawyer. The saws shall be disengaged from the source of power which shall be locked out before repairs or changes are made.

(D) When needed for protection of personnel, an automatic stop or interlocking device shall be installed on log hauls or slips.

(E) A barricade or other positive stop of adequate strength shall be provided to protect the sawyer from rolling logs.

(F) A guard shall be provided to prevent logs from rolling off the log deck into the well.

(G) The sawyer shall be safeguarded either by his or her location or by use of substantial screens or approved safety glass.

(H) A substantial stop or bumper shall be installed at each end of the carriage run.

(I) Canting gear or other equipment shall not be allowed to hang over the log deck in such a manner as to endanger employees.

(J) Canting gear controls shall be marked to indicate their function.

(K) The sawyer shall be primarily responsible for the safety of the carriage crew and off- bearers. He or she shall exercise due care in the operation of the carriage and log turning devices.

(L) A control device shall be provided so that the sawyer may stop the head rig section of the mill without leaving his or her stand.

(M) The feed control lever of friction or belt-driven carriage feed works shall be designed to operate away from the saws or carriage track.

(N) Feed works and log turning control levers shall be so arranged that they may be secured when not in use and shall be adequately guarded against accidental activation.

(O) Carriages upon which persons are required to work shall be solidly decked over and the employees properly protected.

(P) Substantial sweeps shall be installed in front of each carriage wheel. Such sweeps shall extend to within 1/4 inch of the rails.

(Q) Where power-operated log turners are used, carriage knees shall be provided with goosenecks or other substantial means of protecting the carriage crew.

(q) Belt conveyors.

(A) The sides of the conveyor shall be constructed so that the pulpwood will not fall off.

(B) Where conveyors cross passageways or roadways, a horizontal platform shall be provided under the conveyor extending out from the sides of the conveyor a distance equal to 1 1/2 times the length of the wood handled. The platform shall extend the width of the road plus 2 feet on each side and shall be kept free of wood and rubbish. The edges of the platform shall be provided with toeboards or other protection to prevent wood from falling, in accordance with American National Standard A10.18-1983.

(C) All conveyors for pulpwood shall have the in-running nips between chain and sprockets guarded; also, turning drums shall be guarded.

(D) Every belt conveyor shall have an emergency stop cable extending the length of the conveyor so that it may be stopped from any location along the line, or conveniently located stop buttons within 10 feet of each work station, in accordance with American National Standard ANSI/ASME B20.1-1993.

(r) Signs. Where conveyors cross walkways or roadways in the yards, signs reading “Danger – Overhead Conveyor” or an equivalent warning shall be erected, in accordance with American National Standard for Safety Color Code, ANSI Z535.1-1991.

(5) Handling and Storage of Raw Materials Other Than Pulpwood or Pulp Chips.

(a) Personal protective equipment.

(A) Whenever possible, all dust, fumes, and gases incident to handling materials shall be controlled at the source, in accordance with OAR 437-002-0382, Oregon Rules for Air Contaminants, in Subdivision Z. Where control at the source is not possible, respirators with goggles or protective masks shall be provided, and employees shall wear them when handling alum, clay, soda ash, lime, bleach powder, sulfur, chlorine, and similar materials, and when opening rag bales.

(B) When handling liquid acid or alkali, workers shall be provided with approved eye and face protection and protective clothing, in accordance with Subdivision I, Personal Protective Equipment.

(b) Clearance.

(A) When materials are being piled inside a building and upon platforms, an aisle clearance at least 3 feet greater than the widest truck in use shall be provided.

(B) Baled paper and rags stored inside a building shall not be piled closer than 18 inches to walls, partitions, or sprinkler heads.

(c) Piling and unpiling pulp.

(A) Piles of wet lap pulp (unless palletized) shall be stepped back one-half the width of the sheet for each 8 feet of pile height. Sheets of pulp shall be interlapped to make the pile secure. Pulp shall not be piled over pipelines to jeopardize pipes, or so as to cause overloading of floors, or to within 18 inches below sprinkler heads.

(B) Piles of pulp shall not be undermined when being unpiled.

(C) Floor capacities shall be clearly marked on all floors.

(d) Chocking rolls.

(A) Where rolls are pyramided two or more high, chocks shall be installed between each roll on the floor and at every row. Where pulp and paper rolls are stored on smooth floors in processing areas, rubber chocks with wooden core shall be used.

(B) When rolls are decked two or more high, the bottom rolls shall be chocked on each side to prevent shifting in either direction.

(6) Preparing Pulpwood.

(a) Gang and slasher saws. A guard shall be provided in front of all gang and slasher saws to protect workers from wood thrown by saws. A guard shall be placed over tail sprockets.

(b) Slasher tables. Saws shall be stopped and power switches shall be locked out and tagged whenever it is necessary for any person to be on the slasher table.

(c) Slasher drive belts, pulleys, and shafts. All belts, pulleys, and shafts shall be guarded in accordance with American National Standard ANSI/ASME B15.1-1992.

(d) Runway to the jack ladder. The runway from the pond or unloading dock to the table shall be protected with standard handrails and toeboards. Inclined portions shall have cleats or equivalent nonslip surfacing, in accordance with Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces. Protective equipment shall be provided for persons working over water.

(e) Guards below table. Where not protected by the frame of the machine, the underside of the slasher saws shall be enclosed with guards.

(f) Conveyors. The requirements of section (4)(q) of this rule shall apply.

(g) Circular saws (not slasher saws). Saws shall be provided with standard guards, in accordance with American National Standard ANSI O1.1-1992.

(h) Fixed chain saws, circular cut-off saws, drag and swing saws.

(A) Saws shall be so arranged that they will not project into any passageway when in an idle or working position. When existing conditions do not leave clear passage the saws shall be fenced off in order to make it impossible for anyone to walk into them.

(B) Drag saws and fixed chain saws shall be equipped with a device that will safely lock them in an “UP” position.

(C) All persons shall be in the clear before starting operations of a drag, chain, or swing saw.

(D) Log decks shall be equipped with a device to hold the material stable while being cut.

(i) Barker feed. Each barker shall be equipped with a feed and turnover device which will make it unnecessary for the operator to hold a bolt or log by hand during the barking operation. Eye, ear, and head protection shall be provided for the operator, in accordance with section (3)(c) of this rule.

(j) Guards. A guard shall be installed around barkers to confine flying particles, in accordance with ANSI/ASME B15.1-1992.

(k) Stops. All control devices shall be locked out and tagged when knives are being changed.

(l) Speed governor. Water wheels, when directly connected to barker disks or grinders, shall be provided with speed governors, if operated with gate wide open.

(m) Continuous barking drums.

(A) When platforms or floors allow access to the sides of the drums, a standard railing shall be constructed around the drums. When two or more drums are arranged side by side, proper walkways with standard handrails shall be provided between each set, in accordance with section (3)(d) of this rule.

(B) Sprockets and chains, gears, and trunnions shall have standard guards, in accordance with section (3)(a) of this rule.

(C) Whenever it becomes necessary for a worker to go within a drum, the driving mechanism shall be locked and tagged, at the main disconnect switch, in accordance with section (3)(e) of this rule.

(D) This subsection (m) also applies to barking drums employed in the yard.

(n) Intermittent barking drums. In addition to motor switch, clutch, belt shifter, or other power disconnecting device, intermittent barking drums shall be equipped with a device which may be locked to prevent the drum from moving while it is being emptied or filled.

(o) Hydraulic barkers.

(A) Hydraulic barkers shall be enclosed with strong baffles at the inlet and the outlet. The operator shall be protected by at least five-ply laminated glass.

(B) The high pressure hoses of hydraulic barkers shall be secured in such a manner that the hose connection ends will be restrained if a hose connection fails.

(p) Splitter block. The block upon or against which the wood is rested shall have a corrugated surface or other means provided that the wood will not slip. Wood to be split, and also the splitting block, shall be free of ice, snow, or chips. The operator shall be provided with eye and foot protection. A clear and unobstructed view shall be maintained between equipment and workers around the block and the workers’ help area.

(q) Power control. Power for the operation of the splitter shall be controlled by a clutch or equivalent device.

(r) Knot cleaners. The operators of knot cleaners of the woodpecker type shall wear eye protection equipment.

(s) Chipper spout. The feed system to the chipper spout shall be arranged in such a way that the operator does not stand in a direct line with the chipper spout. All chipper spouts shall be enclosed to a height of at least 42 inches from the floor or operator’s platform. When other protection is not sufficient, the operator shall be protected from falling into the chipper by the use of a safety belt and lanyard. Ear protection equipment shall be worn by the operator and others in the immediate area if there is any possibility that the noise level may be harmful (see §1910.95, Occupational Noise Exposure, in Subdivision G).

(t) Feeding material/clearing jams in machines. Appropriate safety belts and lanyards and face protection shall be used by employees who manually feed material or clear jams in machines unless other provisions are made which will protect the employees.

(u) Carriers for knives. Carriers shall be provided and used for transportation of knives.

(7) Rag and Old Paper Preparation.

(a) Ripping and trimming tools.

(A) Hand knives and scissors shall have blunt points, shall be fastened to the table with chain or thong, and shall not be carried on the person but placed safely in racks or sheaths when not in use.

(B) Hand knives and sharpening steels shall be provided with guards at the junction of the handle and the blade. Utility knives with blade exposure of 2-1/2 inches or less are exempted from this requirement.

(b) Shredders, cutters, and dusters.

(A) Rotating heads or cylinders shall be completely enclosed except for an opening at the feed side sufficient to permit only the entry of stock. The enclosure shall extend over the top of the feed rolls. It shall be constructed either of solid material or with mesh or openings not exceeding 1/2-inch and substantial enough to contain flying particles and prevent accidental contact with moving parts. The enclosure shall be bolted or locked into place.

(B) A smooth-pivoted idler roll resting on the stock or feed table shall be provided in front of feed rolls except when arrangements prevent the operator from standing closer than 36 inches to any part of the feed rolls.

(C) Any manually fed cutter, shredder, or duster shall be provided with an idler roll as per section (7)(b)(B) of this rule or the operator shall use special hand-feeding tools.

(D) Hoods of cutters, shredders, and dusters shall have exhaust ventilation, in accordance with §1910.94, Ventilation, in Subdivision G.

(c) Blowers.

(A) Blowers used for transporting rags shall be provided with feed hoppers having outer edges located not less than 48 inches from the fan.

(B) The arrangement of the blower discharge outlets and work areas shall be such as to prevent material from falling on workers.

(d) Conveyors. Conveyors and conveyor drive belts and pulleys shall be fully enclosed or, if open and within 7 feet of the floor, shall be constructed and guarded in accordance with section (4)(q) of this rule, and Subdivision N, Material Handling and Storage.

(e) Guarding requirements.

(A) Traveling sections of conveyors and other equipment with wheels which run on rails or guides shall be guarded by sweep guards, installed in front of the traveling wheels in all areas where workers may be exposed to contact. Sweep guards shall have not greater than 1/4 inch clearance above the rail or guide.

(B) When using mechanical equipment to elevate the front end of the chip containers for dumping into a hopper, the shear area between the floor and the elevated section shall be safeguarded.

(f) Dust. Measures for the control of dust shall be provided, in accordance with American National Standard ANSI/NFPA 91-1992 and Subdivision I, Personal Protective Equipment.

(g) Rag cookers.

(A) When cleaning, inspection, or other work requires that persons enter rag cookers, all steam and water valves, or other control devices, shall be locked and tagged in the closed or “off” position. Blank flanging of pipelines is acceptable in place of closed and locked valves.

(B) When cleaning, inspection, or other work requires that persons must enter the cooker, one person shall be stationed outside in a position to observe and assist in case of emergency, in accordance with section (3)(f) of this rule.

(C) Rag cookers shall be provided with safety valves in accordance with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Unfired Pressure Vessels – 1992.

(8) Chemical Processes of Making Pulp.

(a) Industrial kiln guns and ammunition. Management shall develop written instructions, including safety procedures, for storing and operating industrial kiln guns and ammunition. All persons working with this equipment shall be instructed in these procedures and shall follow them.

(b) Sulfur burners.

(A) Sulfur-burner houses shall be safely and adequately ventilated, and every precaution shall be taken to guard against dust explosion hazards and fires, in accordance with American National Standard Z9.2-1979 (R1991), and NFPA 655-1993.

(B) Nonsparking tools and equipment shall be used in handling dry sulfur.

(C) Sulfur storage bins shall be kept free of sulfur dust accumulation, in accordance with American National Standard ANSI Z9.2-1979 (R1991).

(D) Electric equipment shall be of the explosion-proof type, in accordance with the requirements of Subdivision S, Electrical.

(E) Sulfur-melting equipment shall not be located in the burner room.

(c) Protection for employees (acid plants).

(A) Gas masks, fitted with canisters containing absorbents for the particular acids, gases, or mists involved, shall be provided for employees of the acid department.

(B) Supplied air respirators shall be strategically located for emergency and rescue use.

(C) During inspection, repairs, or maintenance of acid towers, the worker shall be provided with eye protection, a supplied air respirator, a safety belt, and an attached lifeline. The line shall be extended to an attendant stationed outside the tower opening.

(d) Acid tower structure. Outside elevators shall be inspected daily during winter months when ice materially affects safety. Elevators, runways, stairs, etc., for the acid tower shall be inspected monthly for defects that may occur because of exposure to acid or corrosive gases.

(e) Tanks (acid). Entering acid tanks shall be in accordance with 437-002-0146 Confined Spaces, in Subdivision J.

(f) Clothing. Where lime slaking takes place, employees shall be provided with rubber boots, rubber gloves, protective aprons, and eye protection. A deluge shower and eye fountain shall be provided to flush the skin and eyes to counteract lime or acid burns.

(g) Lead burning. When lead burning is being done within tanks, fresh air shall be forced into the tanks so that fresh air will reach the face of the worker first and the direction of the current will never be from the source of the fumes toward the face of the workers. Supplied air respirators (constant-flow type) shall be provided.

NOTE: (For specifics refer to Subdivision Q, Welding, Cutting and Brazing; and §1910.1025, Lead, in Subdivision Z.)

(h) Hoops for acid storage tanks. Hoops of tanks shall be made of rods rather than flat strips and shall be safely maintained by scheduled inspections.

(i) Quicklime stoppages. Water shall not be used to unplug quicklime stops or plugs in pipes or confined spaces.

(j) Digester building exits. At least one unobstructed exit at each end of the room shall be provided on each floor of a digester building.

(k) Digester building escape respirators. Escape respirators shall be available for escape purposes only. These respirators shall meet the requirements of §1910.134 in Subdivision I, including the requirement to be inspected at frequent intervals, not to exceed one month.

(l) Elevators.

(A) Elevators shall be constructed in accordance with American National Standard A17.1-1990.

(B) Elevators shall be equipped with escape respirators for the maximum number of passengers.

(C) Elevators shall be equipped with an alarm system to advise of failure.

(m) Blowoff valves and piping.

(A) The blowoff valve of a digester shall be arranged so as to be operated from another room, remote from safety valves.

(B) All fasteners used to secure digester piping shall conform to ANSI/ASME B31.1-1992.

(C) Digester blow valves shall be pinned or locked in closed position throughout the entire cooking period. This rule applies only to manually operated valves in batch digestors.

(n) Blow lines.

(A) When blow lines from more than one digester lead into one pipe, the cock or valve of the blow line from the tank being inspected or repaired shall be locked and tagged out, or the line shall be disconnected and blocked off.

(B) Test holes in piping systems. Test holes in blow lines of piping systems shall not be covered with insulation or other materials.

(o) Inspection and repair of tanks. All piping leading to tanks shall be blanked off or valved and locked in accordance with §1910.147, Lockout/Tagout, in Subdivision J.

(p) Blow pits and blow tanks.

(A) Blow-pit openings shall be preferably on the side of the pit instead of on top. When located on top, openings shall be as small as possible and shall be provided with railings, in accordance with Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(B) Entrance into blow pits must be done in accordance with 437-002-0146, Subdivision J.

(C) A signaling device shall be installed in the digester and blow-pit rooms and chip bins to be operated as a warning before and while digesters are being blown.

(D) Blow-pit hoops shall be maintained in a safe condition.

(q) Blowing batch digester.

(A) Blowoff valves shall be opened slowly.

(B) After the digester has started to be blown, the blowoff valve shall be left open, and the hand plate shall not be removed until the digester cook signals the blowpit person that the blow is completed. Whenever it becomes necessary to remove the hand plate to clear stock, operators shall wear eye protection equipment and protective clothing to guard against burns from hot stock.

(C) Means shall be provided whereby the digester cook shall signal the person in the chip bin before starting to load the digester.

(r) Inspecting and repairing digester.

(A) Valves controlling lines leading into a digester shall be locked out and tagged in accordance with §1910.147, Lockout/Tagout, in Subdivision J.

(B) Sources of energy associated with a digester shall be isolated in accordance with §1910.147, Lockout/Tagout, in Subdivision J.

(C) Entry into the digester shall be in accordance with 437-002-0146 Confined Spaces, in Subdivision J.

(D) The concentration of lead in the air shall not exceed the limits specified in §1910.1025, Lead, Subdivision Z.

(E) All employees entering digesters for inspection or repair work shall be provided with protective headgear.

(F) Eye protection and dust respirators shall be provided to workers while the old brick lining is being removed, in accordance with Subdivision I, Personal Protective Equipment.

(G) Sanitary facilities shall be provided as specified in §1910.141, Sanitation, in Subdivision J.

(s) Pressure tanks-accumulators (acid).

(A) Safety regulations governing inspection and repairing of pressure tanks-accumulators (acid) shall be the same as those specified in section (8)(t) of this rule.

(B) The pressure tanks-accumulators shall be inspected twice annually and more frequently if required by the manufacturer or engineer’s recommendations. (Refer to Boiler and Pressure Vessel Safety Laws of the State Building Codes Division, Department of Consumer and Business Services.)

(t) Pressure vessels (safety devices).

(A) Each unfired pressure vessel shall have a pressure relieving device or devices installed and operated in accordance with ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII (Unfired Pressure Vessels – 1992). In the case of batch digesters with safety pressure relieving devices installed directly to the pressure vessel, means shall be devised to verify regularly that the safety devices have not become plugged or corroded to the point of being inoperative.

(B) All safety devices shall conform to Paragraph U-2 in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Unfired Pressure Vessels – 1992.

(u) Miscellaneous. Insofar as the processes of the sulfate and soda operations are similar to those of the sulfite processes, sections (8)(a) through (t) of this rule shall apply.

(A) Quick operating showers, bubblers, etc., shall be available for emergency use in case of caustic soda burns.

(B) Rotary tenders, smelter operators, and those cleaning smelt spouts shall be provided with eye protection equipment (fitted with lenses that filter out the harmful rays emanating from the light source) when actively engaged in their duties, in accordance with §1910.132, in Subdivision I.

(C) Piping, valves and fittings between the digester, blowpit, and blow tanks shall be in accordance with ANSI/ASME B31.1-1992. These shall be inspected at least semi-annually to determine the degree of deterioration and repaired or replaced when necessary, in accordance with American National Standards ANSI/ASME B31.1-1992.

(v) Welding. Welding on blow tanks, accumulator tanks, or any other vessels where turpentine vapor or other combustible vapor could gather shall be done only after the vessel has been completely purged of fumes. Fresh air shall be supplied workers inside of vessels.

NOTE: See Subdivision Q, Welding, Cutting and Brazing, for additional welding requirements.

(w) Turpentine systems and storage tanks. Nonsparking tools and ground hose shall be used when pumping out the tank. The tank shall be surrounded by a berm or moat.

(x) Recovery furnace area.

(A) An audible warning system shall be installed in kraft and soda base sulfite recovery furnace areas and shall be activated whenever an emergency exists.

(B) All personnel working in recovery furnace areas shall be instructed on procedures to be followed when emergency warning systems are activated.

(C) Emergency warning systems in the recovery furnace areas shall be kept in proper working condition and shall be tested or checked weekly.

(D) Workers shall stand to the side while opening a furnace or boiler firebox door.

(E) Smelt-dissolving tanks shall be covered and the cover kept closed, except when samples are being taken.

(F) Smelt tanks shall be provided with vent stacks and explosion doors, in accordance with American National Standard ANSI/UL 641-1985.

(G) An emergency shutdown procedure as currently recommended by the boiler manufacturer shall be implemented and used when an emergency shutdown is required. Both normal and emergency shutdown procedures shall be posted.

(H) Recovery furnaces and power boilers are to be constructed, maintained, and serviced as required by the State Building Codes Division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services.

(I) Open pipes shall not be used as punch bars if the use would create a hazard.

(J) Furnace room. Exhaust ventilation shall be provided where niter cake is fed into a rotary furnace and shall be so designed and maintained as to keep the concentration of hydrogen sulfide gas below the limits listed in OAR 437-002-0382, Oregon Rules for Air Contaminants, in Subdivision Z.

(9) Bleaching.

(a) Bleaching containers. Bleaching containers, such as cells, towers (bleaching engines), etc., except the Bellmer type, shall be completely covered on the top, with the exception of one small opening large enough to allow filling but too small to admit a person. Platforms leading from one engine to another shall have standard guardrails, in accordance with Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(b) Bleach plant alarm system. An audible alarm system shall be installed and it shall be activated whenever a serious leak or break develops in the bleach plant area which creates a health or fire hazard.

(c) Bleach mixing rooms.

(A) Areas where dry bleach powder is mixed shall be provided with adequate exhaust ventilation, located at the floor level, in accordance with ANSI/UL 641-1985.

(B) Respiratory protection shall be provided for emergency use, in accordance with American National Standards ANSI/NFPA 1404- 1989, and Z88.2-1980. Respiratory protection must conform to the requirements of §1910.134 of Subdivision I.

(C) For emergency and rescue work, self-contained air masks or supplied air equipment shall be provided in accordance with American National Standards Z88.2-1980. Respiratory protection must conform to the requirements of §1910.134 of Subdivision I.

(d) Liquid chlorine.

(A) Tanks of liquid chlorine shall be stored in an adequately ventilated unoccupied room, where their possible leakage cannot affect workers.

(B) Gas masks capable of absorbing chlorine shall be supplied, conveniently placed, and regularly inspected, and workers who may be exposed to chlorine gas shall be instructed in their use.

(C) For emergency and rescue work, independent self-contained breathing apparatus or supplied air equipment shall be provided.

(D) At least two exits, remote from each other, shall be provided for all rooms in which chlorine is stored.

(E) Spur tracks upon which tank cars containing chlorine and caustic are spotted and connected to pipelines shall be protected by means of a derail in front of the cars.

(F) All chlorine, caustic, and acid lines shall be marked for positive identification, in accordance with American National Standard A13.1-1981 (R 1985).

(e) Handling chlorine dioxide.

(A) Chlorine dioxide generating and storage facilities shall be placed in areas which are adequately ventilated and are easily kept clean of wood, paper, pulp, etc., to avoid contamination which might cause a reaction. This can be accomplished by placing these facilities in a separate room or in a designated outside space.

(B) Safety showers and/or jump tanks and eyewash fountains shall be provided for persons working around sodium chlorate and the other hazardous chemicals involved in this process.

(C) Water hoses for flushing spills shall be adequate in size and located where needed.

(D) The generating area shall have signs in accordance with Subdivision J, General Environmental Controls, warning of the hazard and restricting entrance to authorized personnel only.

(E) Facilities handling sodium chlorate and chlorine dioxide shall be declared “No Smoking” areas and shall have signs posted accordingly.

(F) All equipment involved in the chlorine dioxide process where pressure may be generated shall be provided with adequate pressure relief devices.

(G) Respiratory protective equipment approved for use in exposures to chlorine and chlorine dioxide gases shall be provided.

(H) Management shall be responsible for developing written instructions including safety procedures for operating and maintaining the generator and associated equipment. All personnel working on this equipment shall be thoroughly trained in these procedures and shall follow them.

(I) Only authorized personnel shall be allowed in close proximity to the chlorine dioxide generating equipment.

(J) When reasonably possible, the sample station should be located on the outside of the generating room. Goggles must be worn when taking samples.

(K) Welding or burning shall not be performed on the generator system while it is operating. Immediately before maintenance can be performed on the inside of any of this equipment, it shall be thoroughly flushed with water and purged of hazardous gases.

(L) Chlorine and chlorine dioxide gas shall be carried away from the work place and breathing area by an exhaust system. The gas shall be rendered neutral or harmless before being discharged into the atmosphere. The requirements of American National Standard Z9.2-1979 (R1991) shall apply to this subdivision.

(f) Handling sodium chlorate.

(A) Workers handling and working with sodium chlorate shall be thoroughly trained in precautions to be used in handling and special work habits.

(B) Workers exposed to direct contact with sodium chlorate shall wear appropriate personal protective equipment.

(C) Facilities for storage and handling of sodium chlorate shall be constructed so as to eliminate possible contact of dry or evaporated sodium chlorate with wood or other material which could cause a fire or explosion.

(D) Chlorine gas shall be carried away from the work place and breathing area by an exhaust system. The gas shall be rendered neutral or harmless before being discharged into the atmosphere. The requirements of American National Standard Z9.2-1979 (R1991) shall apply to this subdivision.

(E) Sodium chlorate facilities shall be constructed with a minimum of packing glands, stuffing boxes, etc.

(g) Bagged or drummed chemicals. Bagged or drummed chemicals require efficient handling to prevent damage and spillage. Certain oxidizing chemicals used in bleaching pulp and also in some sanitizing work require added precautions for safety in storage and handling. In storage, these chemicals shall be isolated from combustible materials and other chemicals with which they will react such as acids. They shall also be kept dry, clean and uncontaminated.

(10) Mechanical Pulp Process.

(a) Pulp grinders.

(A) Water wheels directly connected to pulp grinders shall be provided with speed governors limiting the peripheral speed of the grinder to that recommended by the manufacturer.

(B) Doors of pocket grinders shall be arranged so as to keep them from closing accidentally.

(b) Butting saws. Hood guards shall be provided on butting saws, in accordance with American National Standard ANSI O1.1-1992.

(c) Floors and platforms. The requirements of section (3)(d) of this rule shall apply.

(d) Personal protection. Persons exposed to falling material shall wear eye, head, foot, and shin protection equipment, in accordance with Subdivision I, Personal Protective Equipment.

(11) Stock Preparation.

(a) Pulp shredders.

(A) Cutting heads shall be completely enclosed except for an opening at the feed side sufficient to permit only entry of stock. The enclosure shall be bolted or locked in place. The enclosure shall be of solid material or with mesh or other openings not exceeding 1/2-inch.

(B) Either a slanting feed table with its outer edge not less than 36 inches from the cutting head or an automatic feeding device shall be provided.

(C) Repairs for cleaning of blockage shall be done only when the shredder is shutdown and control devices locked.

(D) All power-driven mechanisms shall be guarded in accordance with section (3)(a) of this rule.

(b) Pulp conveyors. Pulp conveyors and conveyor drive belts and pulleys shall be fully enclosed, or if open and within 7 feet of the floor, shall be constructed and guarded in accordance with Subdivision N, Material Handling and Storage, and Subdivision O, Machinery and Machine Guarding.

(c) Floors, steps, and platforms. The requirements of section (3)(d) of this rule shall apply.

(d) Beaters.

(A) Beater rolls shall be provided with covers.

(B) Guardrails 42 inches high shall be provided around beaters where tub tops are less than 42 inches from the floor, in accordance with section (3)(d) of this rule and Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(C) When cleaning, inspecting, or other work requires that persons enter the beaters, all control devices shall be locked and tagged out, in accordance with §1910.147, Lockout, in Subdivision J.

(D) When beaters are fed from the floor above, the chute opening, if less than 42 inches from the floor, shall be provided with a complete rail or other enclosure. Openings for manual feeding shall be sufficient only for entry of stock and shall be provided with at least two permanently secured crossrails, in accordance with Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(E) Floors around beaters shall be provided with sufficient drainage to remove wastes.

(e) Pulpers.

(A) All pulpers having the top or any other opening of the vessel less than 42 inches from the floor or work platform shall have such openings guarded by railed or other enclosures. For manual charging, openings shall be sufficient only to permit the entry of stock and shall be provided with at least two permanently secured crossrails, in accordance with §1910.23, Guarding Floor and Wall Openings and Holes, in Subdivision D.

(B) When cleaning, inspecting or other work requires persons to enter the pulpers it shall be in accordance with 437-002-0146 Confined Spaces, in Subdivision J. All power mechanisms shall be guarded as required in Subdivision O, Machinery and Machine Guarding.

(C) Cleaning or inspecting pulpers or other work, including work above the pulper in a dangerous position, shall be in accordance with §1910.147, Lockout, in Subdivision J.

(D) All power mechanisms shall be guarded in accordance with Subdivision O, Machinery and Machine Guarding.

(f) Pulping devices. Emergency stop controls shall be provided at the feed point when pulping devices are fed manually from the floor above.

(g) Guillotine-type roll splitters. Rolls shall be centered and in a horizontal position directly below the guillotine-type blade while being split. No part of the body shall be under the guillotine-type blade.

(h) Stock chests and tanks.

(A) All control devices shall be locked when persons enter stock chests, in accordance with §1910.147, Lockout/Tagout, in Subdivision J.

(B) All power mechanisms shall be guarded in accordance with Subdivision O, Machinery and Machine Guarding.

(C) When cleaning, inspecting, or other work requires that persons enter stock chests, they shall be provided with a low-voltage extension light.

(12) Machine Room.

(a) Controls and safety devices.

(A) Electrically or manually operated power disconnecting devices for all power-operated equipment shall be provided within easy reach of the operator while in his or her normal operating position. If necessary for safety of the operation, the machine shall be so equipped that retarding or braking action can be applied at the time of or after the source of power is deactivated.

(B) Pulp and paper machines shall be equipped with stopping devices. The devices shall be located where they can be used readily to stop the machines or sections of the machine. Power disconnect devices and retarding or braking controls provided for in section (12)(a)(A) of this rule are required for the safe operation of a pulp and paper machine.

(C) Brakes, back stops, antirunaway devices, overload releases, and other safety devices shall be inspected and tested frequently to insure that all are operative and maintained in good repair.

(D) An audible alarm shall be sounded prior to starting up any section of a pulp or paper machine. Sufficient time shall be allowed between activation of the alarm system and start-up of the equipment to allow any persons to clear the hazardous area.

(E) In starting up a dryer section, dryers shall be preheated and steam for heating the drums shall be introduced slowly, while the drums are revolving.

(F) Employees shall not attempt to remove a broken carrier rope from a dryer while the section is running at operating speed.

(G) Employees shall not feed a stack with any hand-held device which is capable of going through the nip.

(H) Employees shall stop dryer to remove a wrap except in cases where it can be safely removed by using air or other safe means.

(I) Special protective gloves shall be provided and shall be worn by employees when filing or handling sharp-edged doctor blades.

(J) Employees shall not place their hands between the sharp edge of an unloaded doctor blade and the roll while cleaning the doctor blade.

(K) The crane operator shall ascertain that reels are properly seated at winder stand or at reel arms before he or she disengages the hooks.

(L) Shaftless winders shall be provided with a barrier guard of sufficient strength and size to confine the rolls in the event they become dislodged while running.

(M) Employees shall keep clear of hazardous areas around the lowerator, especially all lowerator openings in a floor and where roll is being discharged.

(N) If a powered roll ejector is used it should be interlocked to prevent accidental actuation until the receiving platform or roll lowering table is in position to receive the roll.

(O) Provision shall be made to hold the rider roll when in a raised position unless counter-balancing eliminates the hazard.

(b) Drives.

(A) All drives, pulleys, couplings, and shafts on equipment requiring service while operating shall have standard guards in accordance with section (3)(a) of this rule.

(B) All drives shall be provided with lockout devices at the power switch which interrupts the flow of current to the unit.

(C) All ends of rotating shafts including dryer drum shafts shall be completely guarded.

(D) All accessible disengaged doctor blades should be covered.

(E) All exposed shafts shall be guarded. Crossovers shall be provided.

(F) Oil cups and grease fittings shall be placed in a safe area remote from nip and heat hazards.

(c) Protective equipment. Face shields, aprons and rubber gloves shall be provided for workers handling acids in accordance with sections (3)(c) and (5)(a) of this rule.

(d) Walkways. Steps and footwalks along the fourdrinier and press section shall have nonslip surfacing and be complete with standard handrails, when practical, in accordance with §1910.23, in Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(e) Steps. Steps of uniform rise and tread with nonslip surfaces shall be provided at each press in accordance with Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(f) Plank walkways. A removable plank shall be provided along each press, with standard guardrails installed. The planks shall have nonslip surfaces in accordance with Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(g) Dryer lubrication. If a gear bearing must be oiled while the machine is in operation, an automatic oiling device to protect the oiler shall be provided, or oil cups and grease fittings shall be placed along the walkways out of reach of hot pipes and dryer gears.

(h) Levers. All levers carrying weights shall be constructed so that weights will not slip or fall off.

(i) First dryer. Either a permanent guardrail or apron guard or both shall be installed in front of the first dryer in each section in accordance with Subdivision O, Machinery and Machine Guarding.

(j) Steam and hot-water pipes. All exposed steam and hot-water pipes within 7 feet of the floor or working platform or within 15 inches measured horizontally from stairways, ramps, or fixed ladders shall be covered with an insulating material, or guarded in such manner as to prevent contact.

(k) Dryer gears. Dryer gears shall be guarded except where the oilers’ walkway is removed out of reach of the gears’ nips and spokes and hot pipes in accordance with Subdivision O, Machinery and Machine Guarding.

(l) Broke hole.

(A) A guardrail shall be provided at broke holes in accordance with Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(B) Where pulpers are located directly below the broke hole on a paper machine and where the broke hole opening is large enough to permit a worker to fall through, any employee pushing broke down the hole shall wear a safety belt and lanyard. The lanyard shall be fastened in such a manner that it is impossible for the person to fall into the pulper.

(C) An alarm bell or a flashing light shall be actuated before dropping material through the broke hole.

(m) Feeder belt. A feeder belt or other effective device shall be provided for starting paper through the calender stack.

(n) Steps. Steps or ladders of uniform rise and tread with nonslip surfaces shall be provided at each calender stack. Handrails and hand grips shall be provided at each calender stack in accordance with Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(o) Grounding. All calender stacks and spreader bars shall be grounded in accordance with Subdivision S, Electrical, as protection against shock induced by static electricity.

(p) Sole plates. All exposed sole plates between dryers, calenders, reels, and rewinders shall have a nonskid surface.

(q) Nip points. The hazard of the nip points on all calender rolls shall be eliminated or mini- mized by means of an effective barrier device, or by feeding the paper into the rolls by means of a rope carrier, air jets, or hand feeding devices.

(r) Scrapers. Alloy steel scrapers with pullthrough blades approximately 3 by 5 inches in size shall be used to remove “scabs” from calender rolls.

(s) Illumination. Permanent lighting shall be installed in all areas where employees are required to make machine adjustments and sheet transfers in accordance with American National Standard ANSI/IES RP-1990.

(t) Control panels. All control panel handles and buttons shall be protected from accidental contact.

(u) Lifting reels.

(A) The reels shall stop rotating before being lifted from bearings.

(B) All lifting equipment (clamps, cables, and slings) shall be maintained in a safe condition and inspected regularly.

(C) Reel shafts with square block ends shall be guarded.

(v) Feeder belts. Feeder belts, carrier ropes, air carriage, or other equally effective means shall be provided for starting paper into the nip or drum-type reels.

(w) In-running nip.

(A) Where the nipping points of all drum winders and rewinders is on the operator’s side, it shall be guarded by barrier guards interlocked with the drive mechanism.

(B) A zero speed switch or locking device shall be installed to prevent the guard from being raised, lowered, or removed while the roll is turning.

(x) Core collars. Set screws for securing core collars to winding and unwinding shafts shall not protrude above the face of the collar. All edges of the collar with which an operator’s hand comes in contact shall be beveled to remove all sharp corners.

(y) Slitter knives. Slitter knives shall be guarded so as to prevent accidental contact. Carriers shall be provided and used for transportation of slitter knives.

(z) Winder shaft. The winder shall have a guide rail to align the shaft for easy entrance into the opened rewind shaft bearing housings.

(aa) Handling rolls, winders and core shafts. Mechanical handling equipment shall be provided for handling rolls, winder shafts, and core shafts that are too heavy for safe manual handling based on the NIOSH Work Practice Guide for Manual Lifting – 1981.

(bb) Winder area. A nonskid surface shall be provided in front of the winder to prevent accidental slipping.

(cc) Radiation. Special standards regarding the use of radiation equipment shall be posted and followed as required by §1910.1096, Ionizing Radiation, in Subdivision Z.

(13) Finishing Room.

(a) Cleaning rolls. Rolls shall be cleaned only on the outrunning side.

(b) Emergency stops. Electrically or manually operated quick power disconnecting devices, interlocked with braking action, shall be provided on all operating sides of the machine within easy reach of all employees. These devices shall be tested by making use of them when stopping the machine.

(c) Core collars. The requirements of section (12)(x) of this rule, and the requirements in Subdivision O, Machinery and Machine Guarding, shall apply.

(d) Elevators. These shall be in accordance with American National Standard ANSI/ASME A17.1-1990.

(e) Control panels. The requirements of section (12)(t) of this rule shall apply.

(f) Guillotine-type cutters.

(A) Each guillotine-type cutter shall be equipped with a control which requires the operator and helper, if any, to use both hands to engage the clutch when operated from within reach of blade.

(B) Each guillotine-type cutter shall be equipped with a nonrepeat device.

(C) Carriers shall be provided and used for transportation of guillotine-type cutter knives.

(g) Rotary cutter.

(A) On single-knife machines a guard shall be provided at a point of contact to the knife.

(B) On duplex cutters the protection required for single-knife machines shall be provided for the first knife, and a hood shall be provided for the second knife.

(C) Safe access shall be provided to the knives of a rotary cutter by means of catwalks with nonslip surfaces, railings, and toeboards in accordance with Subdivision D, Walking-Working Surfaces.

(D) A guard shall be provided for the spreader or squeeze roll at the nip side on sheet cutters.

(E) Electrically or manually operated quick power disconnecting devices with adequate braking action shall be provided on all operating sides of the machine within easy reach of all operators.

(F) The outside slitters shall be guarded.

(h) Platers.

(A) A guard shall be arranged across the face of the rolls to serve as a warning that the operator’s hand is approaching the danger zone.

(B) A quick power disconnecting device shall be installed on each machine within easy reach of the operator.

(i) Finishing room rewinders.

(A) The nipping points of all drum winders and rewinders located on the operator’s side shall be guarded by either automatic or manually operated barrier guards of sufficient height to protect fully anyone working around them. The barrier guard shall be interlocked with the drive mechanism to prevent operating above jog speed without the guard in place. A zero speed switch should be installed to prevent the guard from being raised while the roll is turning.

(B) A nonskid surface shall be provided in front of the rewinder to prevent an employee from slipping in accordance with section (3)(d) of this rule.

(C) Mechanical lifting devices shall be provided for placing and removing rolls from the machine.

(j) Control panels. The requirements of section (12)(t) of this rule shall apply.

(k) Roll-type embosser. The nipping point located on the operator’s side shall be guarded by either automatic or manually operated barrier guards interlocked with the drive.

(l) Converting machines.

(A) When using a crane or hoist to place rolls into a backstand and the operator cannot see both ends of the backstand, appropriate means will be implemented to eliminate hazards involved. The operator shall ascertain that rolls are properly seated at winder stand or at roll arms before he or she disengages the hooks.

(B) All power closing sections shall be equipped with an audible warning system which will be activated when closing the sections.

(C) Slitters, slotters, and scorers not in use shall be properly stored so as not to create a hazard.

(D) Mechanical handling equipment shall be provided for handling rolls or devices that are too heavy for safe manual handling based on the NIOSH Work Practice Guide for Manual Lifting – 1981.

(E) Sheer and pinch points. Sheer and pinch points at the feed mechanism shall be color-coded orange and/or identified by signs in accordance with Subdivision J, General Environmental Controls.

(m) Sorting and counting tables.

(A) Tables shall be smooth and free from splinters, with edges and corners rounded.

(B) Paddles shall be smooth and free from splinters.

(n) Roll splitters. The nip point and cutter knife shall be guarded by either automatic or manually operated barrier guards.

(o) Corrugators.

(A) Rails of rail-mounted devices such as roll stands shall be flush with the adjacent floor, and so installed to provide a minimum of 18 inches clearance between the equipment and walls or other fixed objects.

(B) All corrugating and pressure rolls shall be equipped with appropriately designed and installed threading guides so as to prevent contact with the infeed nip of the various rolls by the operator.

(C) Lower elevating conveyor belt rolls on the single facer bridge shall have a minimum nip clearance of 4 inches.

(D) Web shears at the discharge end of the double facer shall be equipped with barrier-type guards.

(E) Slitter stations not in use shall be disconnected from the power source by positive means.

(F) The adhesive system shall be so designed and installed as to keep fumes and airborne dust within limits in accordance with OAR 437-002-0382, Oregon Rules for Air Contaminants, in Subdivision Z.

(14) Materials Handling.

(a) Hand trucks. No person shall be permitted to ride on a powered hand truck unless it is so designed by the manufacturer. A limit switch shall be on operating handle – 30° each way from a 45° angle up and down.

(b) Power trucks. Power trucks shall comply with Subdivision N, Material Handling and Storage. Adequate ventilation shall be provided and the trucks properly maintained, so that dangerous concentrations of carbon monoxide cannot be generated, especially in warehouses or other isolated areas of a plant.

(c) Carton-stitching machine. The carton-stitching machine shall be guarded to prevent the operator from coming in contact with the stitching head.

(d) Banding of skids, cartons, cases, etc. Banders and helpers shall wear eye protection equipment in accordance with section (3)(c) of this rule.

(e) Unloading cars or trucks.

(A) Loading and unloading materials. Platforms with ladders or stairways shall be installed or alternative methods made available when needed so that workers may safely gain access to and perform work on the top of rail cars or trucks when ladders are not installed on such equipment.

(B) Where steel bands or wires are used in boxcars or trucks, all loaders and helpers shall wear eye protection in accordance with Subdivision I, Personal Protective Equipment.

(C) The construction and use of bridge or dock plates shall conform to the requirements of American National Standard B56.1-1988.

(D) Flag signals, derails, or other protective devices shall be used to protect workers during switching operations. The blue flag policy shall be invoked according to section (4)(j) of this rule.

[Publications: Publications referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295
Hist.: OSHA 7-1994, f. & cert. ef. 11-4-94; OSHA 3-1998, f. & cert. ef. 7-7-98; OSHA 2-2001, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-01; OSHA 1-2012, f. & cert .ef. 4-10-12; OSHA 6-2012, f. 9-28-12, cert. ef. 4-1-13

437-003-0001

Adoption by Reference

In addition to, and not in lieu of, any other safety and health codes contained in OAR Chapter 437, the Department adopts by reference the following federal regulations printed as part of the Code of Federal Regulations, in the Federal Register:

(1) Subdivision A – GENERAL

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1 Purpose and Scope, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.2 Variances from safety and health standards, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.3 Inspections – right of entry, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.4 Rules of practice for administrative adjudications for enforcement of safety and health standards, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.6 Incorporation by reference, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(2) Subdivision B – GENERAL INTERPRETATIONS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.10 Scope of subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.11 Coverage under section 103 of the act distinguished, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.12 Reorganization plan No. 14 of 1950, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.13 Interpretation of statutory terms, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.14 Federal contracts for ‘mixed’ types of performance, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.15 Relationship to the service contract act; Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.16 Rules of construction, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(3) Subdivision C – GENERAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROVISIONS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.20 General safety and health provisions, published 12/12/08, FR vol. 73, no. 240, pp. 75568-75589.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.21 Safety training and education, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940; amended with Oregon OSHA AO 6-2012, repealed (b)(6), f. 9/28/12, ef. 4/1/13.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.22 Recording and reporting of injuries (Reserved)

(d) 29 CFR 1926.23 First aid and medical attention, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.24 Fire protection and prevention, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.25 Housekeeping, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.26 Illumination, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.27 Sanitation, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.28 Personal protective equipment, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.29 Acceptable certifications, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.30 Shipbuilding and ship repairing, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9249.

(l) 29 CFR 1926.31 (Reserved).

(m) 29 CFR 1926.32 Definitions, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35078.

(n) 29 CFR 1926.33 Access to employee exposure and medical records, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 31427.

(o) 29 CFR 1926.34 Means of egress, published 6/30/93, Federal Register, vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35083.

(4) Subdivision D – OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.50 Medical services and first aid, published 6/18/98, FR vol. 63, no. 117, p. 33469.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.51 Sanitation, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35084.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.52 Occupational noise exposure, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.53 Ionizing radiation, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.54 Nonionizing radiation, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.55 Gases, vapors, fumes, dusts, and mists, published 1/10/97, FR vol. 62, no. 7, p. 1619.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.56 Illumination, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.57 Ventilation, published 1/8/98, FR vol. 63, no. 5, p. 1295.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.58 Reserved, §1926.58, Asbestos, tremolite, anthophyllite and actinolite is redesignated as §1926.1101, Asbestos, and §1926.58 is reserved (8/10/94, FR vol. 59, no. 153, pp. 41131-62).

(j) 29 CFR 1926.59 Hazard Communication, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.60 Methylenedianiline (MDA), published 12/12/08, FR vol. 73, no. 240, pp. 75568-75589.

(l) 29 CFR 1926.61 Retention of DOT markings, placards and labels, published 6/20/96, FR vol. 61, p. 31427.

(m) 29 CFR 1926.62 Lead, published 12/12/08, FR vol. 73, no. 240, pp. 75568-75589.

NOTE: Cadmium has been redesignated as §1926.1127.

(n) 29 CFR 1926.65 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response

NOTE: Division 2/H, 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, applies to Construction.

(5) Subdivision E – PERSONAL PROTECTIVE AND LIFE SAVING EQUIPMENT

(a) 29 CFR 1926.95 Criteria for personal protective equipment, published 11/15/07, FR vol. 72, no. 220, p. 64342.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.100 Head protection, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.101 Hearing protection, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.102 Eye and face protection, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35160.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.103 Respiratory protection, published 1/8/98, FR vol. 63, no. 5, p. 1297.

NOTE: 29 CFR 1926.104 Removed, 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40729.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.105 Reserved, 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40729.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.106 Working over or near water, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.107 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40729.

(6) Subdivision F – FIRE PROTECTION AND PREVENTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.150 Fire protection, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.151 Fire prevention, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, p. 25318.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.152 Flammable and combustible liquids, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35162.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.153 Liquefied petroleum gas (LP-Gas), published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35170.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.154 Temporary heating devices, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.155 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(7) Subdivision G – SIGNS, SIGNALS, AND BARRICADES

(a) 29 CFR 1926.200 Accident prevention signs and tags, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35173; amended with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 2-2003, f. 1/30/03, ef. 1/30/03.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.201 Signaling, REPEALED with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 2-2003, f. 1/30/03, ef. 1/30/03.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.202 Barricades, REPEALED with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 2-2003, f. 1/30/03, ef. 1/30/03.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.203 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940; amended with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 2-2003, f. 1/30/03, ef. 1/30/03.

(8) Subdivision H – MATERIALS HANDLING, STORAGE, USE AND DISPOSAL

(a) 29 CFR 1926.250 General requirements for storage, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35173.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.251 Rigging equipment for material handling, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35173.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.252 Disposal of waste materials, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(9) Subdivision I – TOOLS – HAND AND POWER

(a) 29 CFR 1926.300 General requirements, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9250.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.301 Hand tools, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.302 Power operated hand tools, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35175.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.303 Abrasive wheels and tools, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35175.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.304 Woodworking tools, published 3/7/96, FR vol. 61, no. 46, p. 9251.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.305 Jacks - lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic, published Federal Register vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35176.

(10) Subdivision J – WELDING AND CUTTING

(a) 29 CFR 1926.350 Gas welding and cutting, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35179.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.351 Arc welding and cutting, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, p. 25318.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.352 Fire prevention, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.353 Ventilation and protection in welding, cutting, and heating, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35179.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.354 Welding, cutting, and heating in way of preservative coatings, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(11) Subdivision K – ELECTRICAL

(a) 29 CFR 1926.400 Introduction, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.401 (Reserved)

(c) 29 CFR 1926.402 Applicability, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.403 General requirements, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.404 Wiring design and protection, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335; amended with AO 5-2002, repeal (b)(1), f. 6/28/02, ef. 10/1/03.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.405 Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.406 Specific purpose equipment and installations, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.407 Hazardous (classified) locations, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.408 Special systems, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.409 (Reserved)

(k) 29 CFR 1926.415 (Reserved)

(l) 29 CFR 1926.416 General requirements, published 8/12/96, FR vol. 61, no. 156, p. 41738.

(m) 29 CFR 1926.417 Lockout and tagging of circuits, published 8/12/96, FR vol. 61, no. 156, p. 41739.

(n) 29 CFR 1926.418 (Reserved)

(o) 29 CFR 1926.430 (Reserved)

(p) 29 CFR 1926.431 Maintenance of equipment, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(q) 29 CFR 1926.432 Environmental deterioration of equipment, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(r) 29 CFR 1926.433 — 29 CFR 1926.440 (Reserved)

(s) 29 CFR 1926.441 Battery locations and battery charging, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(t) 29 CFR 1926.442 — 29 CFR 1926.448 (Reserved)

(u) 29 CFR 1926.449 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, no. 133, pp. 25294-25335.

(12) Subdivision L – SCAFFOLDING

(a) 29 CFR 1926.450 Scope, application and definitions applicable to this subpart, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.451 General requirements, published 11/25/96, FR vol. 61, no. 228, p. 59831.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.452 Additional requirements applicable to specific types of scaffolds, published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46113.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.453 Aerial lifts, published 11/25/96, FR vol. 61, no. 228, p. 59832.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.454 Training, published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46117.

(f) Appendix A to Subpart L Scaffold Specifications, published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46117.

(g) Appendix B to Subpart L Criteria for determining the feasibility of providing safe access and fall protection for scaffold erectors and dismantlers (Reserved), published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46122.

(h) Appendix C to Subpart L List of National Consensus Standards, published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46122.

(i) Appendix D to Subpart L List of training topics for scaffold erectors and dismantlers, published 8/30/96, FR vol. 61, no. 170, p. 46122.

(j) Appendix E to Subpart L Drawing and illustrations, published 11/25/96, FR vol. 61, no. 228, p. 59832.

(13) Subdivision M – FALL PROTECTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.500 Scope, application, and definitions applicable to this subpart, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.501 Duty to have fall protection, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40732-40733; amended with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.502 Fall protection systems criteria and practices, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40733-40738; amended with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.503 Training requirements. REPEALED with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02, replaced with OI.

(e) Appendix A to Subpart M Determining Roof Widths, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40738-40742.

(f) Appendix B to Subpart M Guardrail Systems, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40743.

(g) Appendix C to Subpart M Personal Fall Arrest Systems, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40743-40746.

(h) Appendix D to Subpart M Positioning Device Systems, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40746.

(14) Subdivision N – HELICOPTERS, HOISTS, ELEVATORS, AND CONVEYORS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.550 (Reserved).

(b) 29 CFR 1926.551 Helicopters, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.552 Material hoists, personnel hoists, and elevators, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.553 Base-mounted drum hoist, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.554 Overhead hoists, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.555 Conveyors, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(15) Subdivision O – MOTOR VEHICLES, MECHANIZED EQUIPMENT, AND MARINE OPERATIONS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.600 Equipment, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.601 Motor vehicles, REPEALED by OR-OSHA Admin. Order 6-2007, f. 9/26/07, ef. 9/26/07.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.602 Material handling equipment, published 12/1/98, FR vol. 63, no. 230, p. 66274; amended by AO 7-2003, f. 12/5/03, ef. 12/5/03.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.603 Pile driving equipment, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.604 Site clearing, published 7/22/77, FR vol. 42, p. 37674.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.605 Marine operations and equipment, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.606 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(16) Subdivision P – EXCAVATIONS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.650 Scope, application, and definitions applicable to this subdivision, published 10/31/89, FR vol. 54, no. 209, pp. 45959-45961.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.651 General requirements, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40730.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.652 Requirements for protective systems, published 10/31/89, FR vol. 54, no. 209, pp. 45961-45962.

(d) Appendices A-F to Subdivision P, Excavations, published 10/31/89, FR vol. 54, no. 209, pp. 45962-45991.

(17) Subdivision Q – CONCRETE AND MASONRY CONSTRUCTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.700 Scope, application and definitions applicable to this subpart, published 10/18/90, FR vol. 55, no. 202, p. 42326.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.701 General requirements, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40730.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.702 Requirements for equipment and tools, published 6/16/88, FR vol. 53, p. 22612.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.703 Requirements for cast-in-place concrete, published 6/16/88, FR vol. 53, p. 22612.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.704 Requirements for precast concrete, published 10/5/89, FR vol. 54, no. 192, p. 41088.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.705 Requirements for lift-slab construction operations, published 10/18/90, FR vol. 55, no. 202, p. 42326.

(g) Appendix A to 1926.705 Lift-slab operations, published 10/18/90, FR vol. 55, no. 202, p. 42326.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.706 Requirements for masonry construction, published 6/16/88, FR vol. 53, p. 22612; amended with OR-OSHA Admin. Order 1-2003, f. 1/30/03, ef. 4/30/03.

(18) Subdivision R – STEEL ERECTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.750 Scope, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.751 Definitions, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137; amended with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02; amended with AO 8-2003, f. 12/30/03, ef. 1/1/04.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.752 Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction sequence, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.753 Hoisting and rigging, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.754 Structural steel assembly, published 4/3/06, FR vol. 71, no. 63, p. 16669.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.755 Column anchorage, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.756 Beams and columns, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.757 Open web steel joists, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137; amended with AO 8-2003, f. 12/30/03, ef. 1/1/04.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.758 Systems-engineered metal buildings, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.759 Falling object protection, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.760 Fall protection, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137; amended with AO 8-2003, f. 12/30/03, ef. 1/1/04.

(l) 29 CFR 1926.761 Training, published 12/12/08, FR vol. 73, no. 240, pp. 75568-75589.

(m) Appendix A to Subpart R Guidelines for establishing the components of a site-specific erection plan: Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with §1926.752(e), published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(n) Appendix B to Subpart R Reserved.

(o) Appendix C to Subpart R Illustrations of bridging terminus points: Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with §1926.757(a)(10) and §1926.757(c)(5), published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(p) Appendix D to Subpart R Illustration of the use of control lines to demarcate controlled decking zones (CDZs): Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with §1926.760(c)(3), REPEALED with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02; amended with AO 8-2003, f. 12/30/03, ef. 1/1/04.

(q) Appendix E to Subpart R Training: Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with §1926.761, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(r) Appendix F to Subpart R Perimeter columns: Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with §1926.756(e) to Protect the Unprotected Side or Edge of a Walking/Working Surface, published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(s) Appendix G to Subpart R Fall protection systems criteria and practices from §1926.502: Nonmandatory Guidelines for Complying with Complying with §1926.760(d), REPEALED with AO 6-2002, f. and ef. 7/19/02; amended with AO 8-2003, f. 12/30/03, ef. 1/1/04.

(t) Appendix H to Subpart R Double connections: Illustration of a clipped end connection and a staggered connection: Non-Mandatory Guidelines for Complying with Complying with §1926.756(c)(1), published 7/17/01, FR vol. 66, no. 137, p. 37137.

(19) Subdivision S – UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION, CAISSONS, COFFERDAMS, AND COMPRESSED AIR

(a) 29 CFR 1926.800 Tunnels and shafts, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp.47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.801 Caissons, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.802 Cofferdams, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.803 Compressed air, published 7/11/86, FR vol. 51, p. 25318.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.804 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) Appendix A to Subpart S Decompression Tables, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(20) Subdivision T – DEMOLITION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.850 Preparatory operations, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.851 Stairs, passageways, and ladders, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.852 Chutes, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.853 Removal of materials through floor openings, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.854 Removal of walls, masonry sections, and chimneys, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.855 Manual removal of floors, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.856 Removal of walls, floors, and materials with equipment, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.857 Storage, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.858 Removal of steel construction, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.859 Mechanical demolition, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.860 Selective demolition by explosives, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(21) Subdivision U — BLASTING AND USE OF EXPLOSIVES

(a) 29 CFR 1926.900 General provisions, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.901 Blaster qualifications, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.902 Surface transportation of explosives, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35311.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.903 Underground transportation of explosives, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.904 Storage of explosives and blasting agents, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35311.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.905 Loading of explosives or blasting agents, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35184.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.906 Initiation of explosive charges – electric blasting, published 6/18/98, FR vol. 63, no. 117, p. 33469.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.907 Use of safety fuse, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.908 Use of detonating cord, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.909 Firing the blast, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.910 Inspection after blasting, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(l) 29 CFR 1926.911 Misfires, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(m) 29 CFR 1926.912 Underwater blasting, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(n) 29 CFR 1926.913 Blasting in excavation work under compressed air, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(o) 29 CFR 1926.914 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 6/30/93, FR vol. 58, no. 124, p. 35184, 35311.

(22) Subdivision V – POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.950 General requirements, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.951 Tools and protective equipment, published 8/9/94, FR vol. 59, no. 152, p. 40730.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.952 Mechanical equipment, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.953 Material handling, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.954 Grounding for protection of employees, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.955 Overhead lines, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.956 Underground lines, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.957 Construction in energized substations, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.958 External load helicopters, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.959 Lineman’s body belts, safety straps, and lanyards, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.960 Definitions applicable to this subpart, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(23) Subdivision W – ROLLOVER PROTECTIVE STRUCTURES: OVERHEAD PROTECTION

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1000 Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling equipment, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.1001 Minimum performance criteria for rollover protective structure for designated scrapers, loaders, dozers, graders, and crawler tractors, published 4/6/79, FR vol. 44, p. 20940.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.1002 Protective frame (ROPS) test procedures and performance requirements for wheel-type agricultural and industrial tractors used in construction, published 7/20/06, FR vol. 71, no. 139, p. 41127..

(d) 29 CFR 1926.1003 Overhead protection for operators of agricultural and industrial tractors, published 2/28/06, FR vol. 71, no. 39, p. 9909.

(24) Subdivision X – STAIRWAYS AND LADDERS

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1050 Scope, application and definitions applicable to this Subdivision, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.1051 General requirements, published 11/14/90, FR vol. 55, no. 220, p. 47688.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.1052 Stairways, published 8/23/91, FR vol. 56, no. 164, pp. 41793-41794.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.1053 Ladders, published 8/23/91, FR vol. 56, no. 164, pp. 41793-41794.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.1054 (Reserved).

(f) 29 CFR 1926.1055 (Reserved).

(g) 29 CFR 1926.1056 (Reserved).

(h) 29 CFR 1926.1057 (Reserved).

(i) 29 CFR 1926.1058 (Reserved).

(j) 29 CFR 1926.1059 (Reserved).

(k) 29 CFR 1926.1060 Training requirements, published 11/14/90, FR vol. 55, no. 220, p. 47691.

(25) Subdivision Z – TOXIC AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1101 Asbestos, published 1/9/09, FR vol. 74, no. 6, p. 858.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.1126 Chromium (VI), published; 3/17/10, FR vol. 75, no. 51, pp. 12681-12686.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.1127 Cadmium, published 12/12/08, FR vol. 73, no. 240, pp. 75568-75589.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.1152 Methylene Chloride, published 12/18/97, FR vol. 62, no. 243, p. 66275.

(26) Subdivision AA – (Reserved).

(27) Subdivision BB – (Reserved).

(28) Subdivision CC – Cranes and Derricks in Construction.

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1400 Scope, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.1401 Definitions, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(c) 29 CFR 1926.1402 Ground conditions, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152. Pp. 47906-48177.

(d) 29 CFR 1926.1403 Assembly/Disassembly – selection of manufacturer or employer procedures, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(e) 29 CFR 1926.1404 Assembly/Disassembly – general requirements (applies to all assembly and disassembly operations), published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(f) 29 CFR 1926.1405 Disassembly – additional requirements for dismantling of booms and jibs (applies to both the use of manufacturer procedures and employer procedures), published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152. Pp. 47906-48177.

(g) 29 CFR 1926.1406 Assembly/Disassembly – employer procedures – general requirements, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(h) 29 CFR 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV) – assembly and disassembly, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(i) 29 CFR 1926.1408 Power line safety (up to 350 kV) – equipment operations, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(j) 29 CFR 1926.1409 Power line safety (over 35 kV), published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, vol. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(k) 29 CFR 1926.1410 Power line safety (all voltages) – equipment operations closer than the Table A zone, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(l) 29 CFR 1926.1411 Power line safety – while traveling, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(m) 29 CFR 1926.1412 Inspections, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(n) 29 CFR 1926.1413 Wire rope – inspection, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(o) 29 CFR 1926.1414 Wire rope – selection and installation criteria, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(p) 29 CFR 1926.1415 Safety devices, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(q) 29 CFR 1926.1416 Operational aids, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(r) 29 CFR 1926.1417 Operation, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(s) 29 CFR 1926.1418 Authority to stop operation, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(t) 29 CFR 1926.1419 Signals – general requirements, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(u) 29 CFR 1926.1420 Signals – radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(v) 29 CFR 1926.1421 Signals – voice signals – additional requirements, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(w) 29 CFR 1926.1422 Signals – hand signal chart, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(x) 29 CFR 1926.1423 Fall protection, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(y) 29 CFR 1926.1424 Work area control, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(z) 29 CFR 1926.1425 Keeping clear of the load, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(aa) 29 CFR 1926.1426 Free fall and controlled load lowering, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(bb) 29 CFR 1926.1427 Operator qualification and certification, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(cc) 29 CFR 1926.1428 Signal person qualifications, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(dd) 29 CFR 1926.1429 Qualifications of maintenance & repair employees, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(ee) 29 CFR 1926.1430 Training, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp.47906-48177.

(ff) 29 CFR 1926.1431 Hoisting personnel, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(gg) 29 CFR 1926.1432 Multiple-crane/derrick lifts – supplemental requirements, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(hh) 29 CFR 1926.1433 Design, construction and testing, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(ii) 29 CFR 1926.1434 Equipment modifications, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(jj) 29 CFR 1926.1435 Tower cranes, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(kk) 29 CFR 1926.1436 Derricks, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(ll) 29 CFR 1926.1437 Floating cranes/derricks and land cranes/derricks on barges, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(mm) 29 CFR 1926.1438 Overhead & gantry cranes, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(nn) 29 CFR 1926.1439 Dedicated pile drivers, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(oo) 29 CFR 1926.1440 Sideboom cranes, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(pp) 29 CFR 1926.1441 Equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds of less, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(qq) 29 CFR 1926.1442 Severability, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(rr) Appendix A to Subdivision CC of 1926 – Standard Hand Signals, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(ss) Appendix B to Subdivision CC of 1926 – Assembly/Disassembly – Sample Procedures for Minimizing the Risk of Unintended Dangerous Boom Movement, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(tt) Appendix C to Subdivision CC of 1926 – Operator Certification – Written Examination – Technical Knowledge Criteria, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(29) Subdivision DD – Cranes and Derricks Used in Demolition and Underground Construction, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

(a) 29 CFR 1926.1500 Scope, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp.47906-48177.

(b) 29 CFR 1926.1501 Cranes and Derricks, published 8/9/10, FR vol. 75, no. 152, pp. 47906-48177.

These standards are available at the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, and the United States Government Printing Office.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 654.025(2) & 656.726(4).
Stats. Implemented: ORS 654.001 - 654.295.
Hist.: APD 5-1989(Temp), f. 3-31-89, ef. 5-1-89; APD 8-1989, f. & ef. 7-7-89; APD 14-1989(Temp), f. 7-20-89, ef. 8-1-89; APD 15-1989, f. & ef. 9-13-89; OSHA 3-1990(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 1-19-90; OSHA 7-1990, f. & cert. ef. 3-2-90; OSHA 8-1990, f. & cert. ef. 3-30-90; OSHA 13-1990(Temp), f. 6-28-90, ef. 8-1-90; OSHA 19-1990, f. & cert. ef. 8-31-90; OSHA 27-1990, f. 12-12-90, cert. ef. 2-1-91; OSHA 6-1991, f. 3-18-91, cert. ef. 4-15-91; OSHA 7-1991, f. & cert. ef. 4-25-91; OSHA 15-1991, f. & cert. ef. 12-13-91; OSHA 16-1991, f. 12-16-91, cert. ef. 1-1-92; OSHA 6-1992, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-92; OSHA 11-1992, f. & cert. ef. 10-9-92; OSHA 1-1993, f. & cert. ef. 1-22-93; OSHA 16-1993, f. & cert. ef. 11-1-93; OSHA 4-1994, f. & cert. ef. 8-4-94; OSHA 1-1995, f. & cert. ef. 1-19-95; OSHA 3-1995, f. & cert. ef. 2-22-95; OSHA 4-1995, f. & cert. ef. 3-29-95; OSHA 5-1995, f. & cert. ef. 4-6-95; OSHA 6-1995, f. & cert. ef. 4-18-95; OSHA 8-1995, f. & cert. ef. 8-25-95; OSHA 5-1996, f. & cert. ef. 11-29-96; OSHA 6-1996, f. & cert. ef. 11-29-96; OSHA 2-1997, f. & cert. ef. 3-12-97; OSHA 4-1997, f. & cert. ef. 4-2-97; OSHA 6-1997, f. & cert. ef. 5-2-97; OSHA 7-1997, f. & cert. ef. 9-15-97; OSHA 3-1998, f. & cert. ef. 7-7-98; OSHA 6-1998, f. & cert. ef. 10-15-98; OSHA 7-1998, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-98; OSHA 2-1999, f. & cert. ef. 4-30-99; OSHA 6-1999, f. & cert. ef. 5-26-99; OSHA 3-2000, f. & cert. ef. 2-8-00; OSHA 3-2001, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-01; OSHA 3-2002, f. 4-15-02, cert. ef. 4-18-02; OSHA 5-2002, f. 6-28-02 cert. ef. 10-1-03; OSHA 6-2002, f. & cert. ef. 7-19-02; OSHA 1-2003, f. 1-30-03 cert. ef. 4-30-03; OSHA 2-2003, f. & cert. ef. 1-30-03; OSHA 7-2003, f. & cert. ef. 12-5-03; OSHA 8-2003, f. 12-30-03 cert. ef. 1-1-04; OSHA 1-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-12-05; OSHA 2-2006, f. & cert. ef. 4-28-06; OSHA 4-2006, f. & cert. ef. 7-24-06; OSHA 5-2006, f. 8-7-06, cert. ef. 1-1-07; OSHA 6-2006, f. & cert. ef. 8-30-06; OSHA 10-2006, f. & cert. ef. 11-30-06; OSHA 6-2007, f. & cert. ef. 9-26-07; OSHA 5-2008, f. 5-1-08, cert. ef. 5-15-08; OSHA 5-2009, f. & cert. ef. 5-29-09; OSHA 3-2010, f. 6-10-10, cert. ef. 6-15-10; OSHA 1-2011, f. & cert. ef. 2-9-11; OSHA 4-2011, f. & cert. ef. 12-8-11; OSHA 5-2011, f. 12-8-11, cert. ef. 7-1-12; OSHA 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 4-10-12; OSHA 3-2012, f. & cert. e.f 8-20-12; OSHA 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 9-25-12; OSHA 6-2012, f. 9-28-12, cert. ef. 4-1-13

Notes
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