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Oregon Bulletin

August 1, 2013

Department of Environmental Quality, Chapter 340

Rule Caption: Corrections and Clarifications to Nonpoint Source Regulations

Adm. Order No.: DEQ 5-2013

Filed with Sec. of State: 6-21-2013

Certified to be Effective: 6-21-13

Notice Publication Date: 3-1-2013

Rules Adopted: 340-041-0007, 340-041-0028, 340-041-0061

Subject: To meet obligations under a stipulated order and legal agreement, DEQ proposes changes to water quality standards for nonpoint sources. The proposed amendments to water quality standards do not change the way agricultural and forest land management activities are regulated to meet water quality standards, or the statutory relationships between DEQ and the Oregon Departments of Agriculture and Forestry. Proposed amendments would also remain consistent with the original intent of federal and state regulations. DEQ proposes deleting the following provisions that describe how nonpoint sources comply with water quality standards:

   1. Statewide Narrative Criteria — OAR 340-041-0007(5)

   The proposed amendment would remove the description of how logging and forest management activities are subject to water quality standards and load allocations. The amendment would honor a legal agreement signed Jan. 31, 2013.

   2. Temperature Rule — OAR 340-041-0028(12)

   Proposed amendments would remove portions of the rule that describe how:

   - Nonpoint sources would implement water quality standards for temperature on private, state and federal agricultural lands and forests, and

   - Nonpoint sources, except forestry and agriculture that comply with their temperature management plans, are considered in compliance with the temperature rule.

   3. Other implementation of water quality criteria — OAR 340-041-0061 The proposed amendments would remove portions of the rule that describe how nonpoint sources would implement water quality standards on private, state and federal agricultural lands and forests.

Rules Coordinator: Maggie Vandehey—(503) 229-6878

340-041-0007

Statewide Narrative Criteria

(1) Notwithstanding the water quality standards contained in this Division, the highest and best practicable treatment and/or control of wastes, activities, and flows must in every case be provided so as to maintain dissolved oxygen and overall water quality at the highest possible levels and water temperatures, coliform bacteria concentrations, dissolved chemical substances, toxic materials, radioactivity, turbidities, color, odor, and other deleterious factors at the lowest possible levels.

(2) Where a less stringent natural condition of a water of the State exceeds the numeric criteria set out in this Division, the natural condition supersedes the numeric criteria and becomes the standard for that water body. However, there are special restrictions, described in OAR 340-041-0004(9)(a)(D)(iii), that may apply to discharges that affect dissolved oxygen.

(3) For any new waste sources, alternatives that utilize reuse or disposal with no discharge to public waters must be given highest priority for use wherever practicable. New source discharges may be approved subject to the criteria in OAR 340-041-0004(9).

(4) No discharges of wastes to lakes or reservoirs may be allowed except as provided in section OAR 340-041-0004(9).

(5) Log handling in public waters must conform to current Commission policies and guidelines.

(6) Sand and gravel removal operations must be conducted pursuant to a permit from the Division of State Lands and separated from the active flowing stream by a watertight berm wherever physically practicable. Recirculation and reuse of process water must be required wherever practicable. Discharges or seepage or leakage losses to public waters may not cause a violation of water quality standards or adversely affect legitimate beneficial uses.

(7) Road building and maintenance activities must be conducted in a manner so as to keep waste materials out of public waters and minimize erosion of cut banks, fills, and road surfaces.

(8) In order to improve controls over nonpoint sources of pollution, federal, State, and local resource management agencies will be encouraged and assisted to coordinate planning and implementation of programs to regulate or control runoff, erosion, turbidity, stream temperature, stream flow, and the withdrawal and use of irrigation water on a basin-wide approach so as to protect the quality and beneficial uses of water and related resources. Such programs may include, but not be limited to, the following:

(a) Development of projects for storage and release of suitable quality waters to augment low stream flow;

(b) Urban runoff control to reduce erosion;

(c) Possible modification of irrigation practices to reduce or minimize adverse impacts from irrigation return flows;

(d) Stream bank erosion reduction projects; and

(e) Federal water quality restoration plans.

(9) The development of fungi or other growths having a deleterious effect on stream bottoms, fish or other aquatic life, or that are injurious to health, recreation, or industry may not be allowed;

(10) The creation of tastes or odors or toxic or other conditions that are deleterious to fish or other aquatic life or affect the potability of drinking water or the palatability of fish or shellfish may not be allowed;

(11) The formation of appreciable bottom or sludge deposits or the formation of any organic or inorganic deposits deleterious to fish or other aquatic life or injurious to public health, recreation, or industry may not be allowed;

(12) Objectionable discoloration, scum, oily sheens, or floating solids, or coating of aquatic life with oil films may not be allowed;

(13) Aesthetic conditions offensive to the human senses of sight, taste, smell, or touch may not be allowed;

(14) Radioisotope concentrations may not exceed maximum permissible concentrations (MPC’s) in drinking water, edible fishes or shellfishes, wildlife, irrigated crops, livestock and dairy products, or pose an external radiation hazard;

(15) Minimum Design Criteria for Treatment and Control of Wastes. Except as provided in OAR 340-041-0101 through 340-041-0350, and subject to the implementation requirements set forth in OAR 340-041-0061, prior to discharge of any wastes from any new or modified facility to any waters of the State, such wastes must be treated and controlled in facilities designed in accordance with the following minimum criteria.

(a) In designing treatment facilities, average conditions and a normal range of variability are generally used in establishing design criteria. A facility once completed and placed in operation should operate at or near the design limit most of the time but may operate below the design criteria limit at times due to variables which are unpredictable or uncontrollable. This is particularly true for biological treatment facilities. The actual operating limits are intended to be established by permit pursuant to ORS 468.740 and recognize that the actual performance level may at times be less than the design criteria.

(A) Sewage wastes:

(i) Effluent BOD concentrations in mg/l, divided by the dilution factor (ratio of receiving stream flow to effluent flow) may not exceed one unless otherwise approved by the Commission;

(ii) Sewage wastes must be disinfected, after treatment, equivalent to thorough mixing with sufficient chlorine to provide a residual of at least 1 part per million after 60 minutes of contact time unless otherwise specifically authorized by permit;

(iii) Positive protection must be provided to prevent bypassing raw or inadequately treated sewage to public waters unless otherwise approved by the Department where elimination of inflow and infiltration would be necessary but not presently practicable; and

(iv) More stringent waste treatment and control requirements may be imposed where special conditions make such action appropriate.

(B) Industrial wastes:

(i) After maximum practicable in-plant control, a minimum of secondary treatment or equivalent control (reduction of suspended solids and organic material where present in significant quantities, effective disinfection where bacterial organisms of public health significance are present, and control of toxic or other deleterious substances);

(ii) Specific industrial waste treatment requirements may be determined on an individual basis in accordance with the provisions of this plan, applicable federal requirements, and the following:

(I) The uses that are or may likely be made of the receiving stream;

(II) The size and nature of flow of the receiving stream;

(III) The quantity and quality of wastes to be treated; and

(IV) The presence or absence of other sources of pollution on the same watershed.

(iii) Where industrial, commercial, or agricultural effluents contain significant quantities of potentially toxic elements, treatment requirements may be determined utilizing appropriate bioassays;

(iv) Industrial cooling waters containing significant heat loads must be subjected to off-stream cooling or heat recovery prior to discharge to public waters;

(v) Positive protection must be provided to prevent bypassing of raw or inadequately treated industrial wastes to any public waters;

(vi) Facilities must be provided to prevent and contain spills of potentially toxic or hazardous materials.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468B.030, 468B.035, 468B.048

Stats. Implemented: ORS 468B.030, 468B.035, 468B.048

Hist.: DEQ 17-2003, f. & cert. ef. 12-9-03; DEQ 2-2007, f. & cert. ef. 3-15-07; DEQ 10-2011, f. & cert. ef. 7-13-11; DEQ 5-2013, f. & cert. ef. 6-21-13

340-041-0028

Temperature

(1) Background. Water temperatures affect the biological cycles of aquatic species and are a critical factor in maintaining and restoring healthy salmonid populations throughout the State. Water temperatures are influenced by solar radiation, stream shade, ambient air temperatures, channel morphology, groundwater inflows, and stream velocity, volume, and flow. Surface water temperatures may also be warmed by anthropogenic activities such as discharging heated water, changing stream width or depth, reducing stream shading, and water withdrawals.

(2) Policy. It is the policy of the Commission to protect aquatic ecosystems from adverse warming and cooling caused by anthropogenic activities. The Commission intends to minimize the risk to cold-water aquatic ecosystems from anthropogenic warming, to encourage the restoration and protection of critical aquatic habitat, and to control extremes in temperature fluctuations due to anthropogenic activities. The Commission recognizes that some of the State’s waters will, in their natural condition, not provide optimal thermal conditions at all places and at all times that salmonid use occurs. Therefore, it is especially important to minimize additional warming due to anthropogenic sources. In addition, the Commission acknowledges that control technologies, best management practices and other measures to reduce anthropogenic warming are evolving and that the implementation to meet these criteria will be an iterative process. Finally, the Commission notes that it will reconsider beneficial use designations in the event that man-made obstructions or barriers to anadromous fish passage are removed and may justify a change to the beneficial use for that water body.

(3) Purpose. The purpose of the temperature criteria in this rule is to protect designated temperature-sensitive, beneficial uses, including specific salmonid life cycle stages in waters of the State.

(4) Biologically Based Numeric Criteria. Unless superseded by the natural conditions criteria described in section (8) of this rule, or by subsequently adopted site-specific criteria approved by EPA, the temperature criteria for State waters supporting salmonid fishes are as follows:

(a) The seven-day-average maximum temperature of a stream identified as having salmon and steelhead spawning use on subbasin maps and tables set out in OAR 340-041-0101 to 340-041-0340: Tables 101B, and 121B, and Figures 130B, 151B, 160B, 170B, 220B, 230B, 271B, 286B, 300B, 310B, 320B, and 340B, may not exceed 13.0 degrees Celsius (55.4 degrees Fahrenheit) at the times indicated on these maps and tables;

(b) The seven-day-average maximum temperature of a stream identified as having core cold water habitat use on subbasin maps set out in OAR 340-041-101 to 340-041-340: Figures 130A, 151A, 160A, 170A, 180A, 201A, 220A, 230A, 271A, 286A, 300A, 310A, 320A, and 340A, may not exceed 16.0 degrees Celsius (60.8 degrees Fahrenheit);

(c) The seven-day-average maximum temperature of a stream identified as having salmon and trout rearing and migration use on subbasin maps set out at OAR 340-041-0101 to 340-041-0340: Figures 130A, 151A, 160A, 170A, 220A, 230A, 271A, 286A, 300A, 310A, 320A, and 340A, may not exceed 18.0 degrees Celsius (64.4 degrees Fahrenheit);

(d) The seven-day-average maximum temperature of a stream identified as having a migration corridor use on subbasin maps and tables OAR 340-041-0101 to 340-041-0340: Tables 101B, and 121B, and Figures 151A, 170A, 300A, and 340A, may not exceed 20.0 degrees Celsius (68.0 degrees Fahrenheit). In addition, these water bodies must have coldwater refugia that are sufficiently distributed so as to allow salmon and steelhead migration without significant adverse effects from higher water temperatures elsewhere in the water body. Finally, the seasonal thermal pattern in Columbia and Snake Rivers must reflect the natural seasonal thermal pattern;

(e) The seven-day-average maximum temperature of a stream identified as having Lahontan cutthroat trout or redband trout use on subbasin maps and tables set out in OAR 340-041-0101 to 340-041-0340: Tables 121B, 140B, 190B, and 250B, and Figures 180A, 201A, 260A and 310A may not exceed 20.0 degrees Celsius (68.0 degrees Fahrenheit);

(f) The seven-day-average maximum temperature of a stream identified as having bull trout spawning and juvenile rearing use on subbasin maps set out at OAR 340-041-0101 to 340-041-0340: Figures 130B, 151B, 160B, 170B, 180A, 201A, 260A, 310B, and 340B, may not exceed 12.0 degrees Celsius (53.6 degrees Fahrenheit). From August 15 through May 15, in bull trout spawning waters below Clear Creek and Mehlhorn reservoirs on Upper Clear Creek (Pine Subbasin), below Laurance Lake on the Middle Fork Hood River, and below Carmen reservoir on the Upper McKenzie River, there may be no more than a 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.5 Fahrenheit) increase between the water temperature immediately upstream of the reservoir and the water temperature immediately downstream of the spillway when the ambient seven-day-average maximum stream temperature is 9.0 degrees Celsius (48 degrees Fahrenheit) or greater, and no more than a 1.0 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) increase when the seven-day-average stream temperature is less than 9 degrees Celsius.

(5) Unidentified Tributaries. For waters that are not identified on the “Fish Use Designations” maps referenced in section (4) of this rule, the applicable criteria for these waters are the same criteria as is applicable to the nearest downstream water body depicted on the applicable map. This section (5) does not apply to the “Salmon and Steelhead Spawning Use Designations” maps.

(6) Natural Lakes. Natural lakes may not be warmed by more than 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.5 degrees Fahrenheit) above the natural condition unless a greater increase would not reasonably be expected to adversely affect fish or other aquatic life. Absent a discharge or human modification that would reasonably be expected to increase temperature, DEQ will presume that the ambient temperature of a natural lake is the same as its natural thermal condition.

(7) Oceans and Bays. Except for the Columbia River above river mile 7, ocean and bay waters may not be warmed by more than 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.5 degrees Fahrenheit) above the natural condition unless a greater increase would not reasonably be expected to adversely affect fish or other aquatic life. Absent a discharge or human modification that would reasonably be expected to increase temperature, DEQ will presume that the ambient temperature of the ocean or bay is the same as its natural thermal condition.

(8) Natural Conditions Criteria. Where the department determines that the natural thermal potential of all or a portion of a water body exceeds the biologically-based criteria in section (4) of this rule, the natural thermal potential temperatures supersede the biologically-based criteria, and are deemed to be the applicable temperature criteria for that water body.

(9) Cool Water Species.

(a) No increase in temperature is allowed that would reasonably be expected to impair cool water species. Waters of the State that support cool water species are identified on subbasin tables and figures set out in OAR 340-041-0101 to 340-041-0340; Tables 140B, 190B and 250B, and Figures 180A, 201A and 340A.

(b) See OAR 340-041-0185 for a basin specific criterion for the Klamath River.

(10) Borax Lake Chub. State waters in the Malheur Lake Basin supporting the Borax Lake chub may not be cooled more than 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.5 degrees Fahrenheit) below the natural condition.

(11) Protecting Cold Water.

(a) Except as described in subsection (c) of this rule, waters of the State that have summer seven-day-average maximum ambient temperatures that are colder than the biologically based criteria in section (4) of this rule, may not be warmed by more than 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.5 degrees Fahrenheit) above the colder water ambient temperature. This provision applies to all sources taken together at the point of maximum impact where salmon, steelhead or bull trout are present.

(b) A point source that discharges into or above salmon & steelhead spawning waters that are colder than the spawning criterion, may not cause the water temperature in the spawning reach where the physical habitat for spawning exists during the time spawning through emergence use occurs, to increase more than the following amounts after complete mixing of the effluent with the river:

(A) If the rolling 60 day average maximum ambient water temperature, between the dates of spawning use as designated under subsection (4)(a) of this rule, is 10 to 12.8 degrees Celsius, the allowable increase is 0.5 Celsius above the 60 day average; or

(B) If the rolling 60 day average maximum ambient water temperature, between the dates of spawning use as designated under subsection (4)(a) of this rule, is less than 10 degrees Celsius, the allowable increase is 1.0 Celsius above the 60 day average, unless the source provides analysis showing that a greater increase will not significantly impact the survival of salmon or steelhead eggs or the timing of salmon or steelhead fry emergence from the gravels in downstream spawning reach.

(c) The cold water protection narrative criteria in subsection (a) do not apply if:

(A) There are no threatened or endangered salmonids currently inhabiting the water body;

(B) The water body has not been designated as critical habitat; and

(C) The colder water is not necessary to ensure that downstream temperatures achieve and maintain compliance with the applicable temperature criteria.

(12) Implementation of the Temperature Criteria.

(a) Minimum Duties. There is no duty for anthropogenic sources to reduce heating of the waters of the State below their natural condition. Similarly, each anthropogenic point and nonpoint source is responsible only for controlling the thermal effects of its own discharge or activity in accordance with its overall heat contribution. In no case may a source cause more warming than that allowed by the human use allowance provided in subsection (b) of this rule.

(b) Human Use Allowance. Insignificant additions of heat are authorized in waters that exceed the applicable temperature criteria as follows:

(A) Prior to the completion of a temperature TMDL or other cumulative effects analysis, no single NPDES point source that discharges into a temperature water quality limited water may cause the temperature of the water body to increase more than 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.5 Fahrenheit) above the applicable criteria after mixing with either twenty five (25) percent of the stream flow, or the temperature mixing zone, whichever is more restrictive; or

(B) Following a temperature TMDL or other cumulative effects analysis, waste load and load allocations will restrict all NPDES point sources and nonpoint sources to a cumulative increase of no greater than 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.5 Fahrenheit) above the applicable criteria after complete mixing in the water body, and at the point of maximum impact.

(C) Point sources must be in compliance with the additional mixing zone requirements set out in OAR 340-041-0053(2)(d).

(D) A point source in compliance with the temperature conditions of its NPDES permit is deemed in compliance with the applicable criteria.

(c) Air Temperature Exclusion. A water body that only exceeds the criteria set out in this rule when the exceedance is attributed to daily maximum air temperatures that exceed the 90th percentile value of annual maximum seven-day average maximum air temperatures calculated using at least 10 years of air temperature data, will not be listed on the section 303(d) list of impaired waters and sources will not be considered in violation of this rule.

(d) Low Flow Conditions. An exceedance of the biologically-based numeric criteria in section (4) of this rule, or an exceedance of the natural condition criteria in section (8) of this rule will not be considered a permit violation during stream flows that are less than the 7Q10 low flow condition for that water body.

(e) Other Nonpoint Sources. The department may, on a case-by-case basis, require nonpoint sources (other than forestry and agriculture), including private hydropower facilities regulated by a 401 water quality certification, that may contribute to warming of State waters beyond 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.5 degrees Fahrenheit), and are therefore designated as water-quality limited, to develop and implement a temperature management plan to achieve compliance with applicable temperature criteria or an applicable load allocation in a TMDL pursuant to OAR 340-042-0080.

(A) Each plan must ensure that the nonpoint source controls its heat load contribution to water temperatures such that the water body experiences no more than a 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.5 degree Fahrenheit) increase above the applicable criteria from all sources taken together at the maximum point of impact.

(B) Each plan must include a description of best management practices, measures, effluent trading, and control technologies (including eliminating the heat impact on the stream) that the nonpoint source intends to use to reduce its temperature effect, a monitoring plan, and a compliance schedule for undertaking each measure.

(C) The Department may periodically require a nonpoint source to revise its temperature management plan to ensure that all practical steps have been taken to mitigate or eliminate the temperature effect of the source on the water body.

(f) Compliance Methods. Anthropogenic sources may engage in thermal water quality trading in whole or in part to offset its temperature discharge, so long as the trade results in at least a net thermal loading decrease in anthropogenic warming of the water body, and does not adversely affect a threatened or endangered species. Sources may also achieve compliance, in whole or in part, by flow augmentation, hyporheic exchange flows, outfall relocation, or other measures that reduce the temperature increase caused by the discharge.

(g) Release of Stored Water. Stored cold water may be released from reservoirs to cool downstream waters in order to achieve compliance with the applicable numeric criteria. However, there can be no significant adverse impact to downstream designated beneficial uses as a result of the releases of this cold water, and the release may not contribute to violations of other water quality criteria. Where the Department determines that the release of cold water is resulting in a significant adverse impact, the Department may require the elimination or mitigation of the adverse impact.

(13) Site-Specific Criteria. The Department may establish, by separate rulemaking, alternative site-specific criteria for all or a portion of a water body that fully protects the designated use.

(a) These site-specific criteria may be set on a seasonal basis as appropriate.

(b) The Department may use, but is not limited by the following considerations when calculating site-specific criteria:

(A) Stream flow;

(B) Riparian vegetation potential;

(C) Channel morphology modifications;

(D) Cold water tributaries and groundwater;

(E) Natural physical features and geology influencing stream temperatures; and

(F) Other relevant technical data.

(c) DEQ may consider the thermal benefit of increased flow when calculating the site-specific criteria.

(d) Once established and approved by EPA, the site-specific criteria will be the applicable criteria for the water bodies affected.

[ED. NOTE: Tables referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468B.030, 468B.035 & 468B.048

Stats. Implemented: ORS 468B.030, 468B.035 & 468B.048

Hist.: DEQ 17-2003, f. & cert. ef. 12-9-03; DEQ 1-2007, f. & cert. ef. 3-14-07; DEQ 2-2007, f. & cert. ef. 3-15-07; DEQ 10-2011, f. & cert. ef. 7-13-11; DEQ 5-2013, f. & cert. ef. 6-21-13

340-041-0061

Other Implementation of Water Quality Criteria

(1) A waste treatment and disposal facility may not be constructed or operated and wastes may not be discharged to public waters without a permit from the department in accordance with ORS 468B.050.

(2) Plans for all sewage and industrial waste treatment, control, and disposal facilities must be submitted to the department for review and approval prior to construction as required by ORS 468B.055.

(3) Minimum design criteria for waste treatment and control facilities prescribed under this plan and other waste treatment and controls deemed necessary to ensure compliance with the water quality standards contained in this plan must be provided in accordance with specific permit conditions for those sources or activities for which permits are required and the following implementation program.

(a) For new or expanded waste loads or activities, fully approved treatment or control facilities, or both, must be provided prior to discharge of any wastes from the new or expanded facilities or conduct of the new or expanded activity.

(b) For existing waste loads or activities, additional treatment or control facilities necessary to correct specific unacceptable water quality conditions must be provided in accordance with a specific program and timetable incorporated into the waste discharge permit for the individual discharger or activity. In developing treatment requirements and implementation schedules for existing installations or activities, consideration will be given to the impact upon the overall environmental quality, including air, water, land use, and aesthetics.

(c) Wherever minimum design criteria for waste treatment and control facilities set forth in this plan are more stringent than applicable federal standards and treatment levels currently being provided, upgrading to the more stringent requirements will be deferred until it is necessary to expand or otherwise modify or replace the existing treatment facilities. Such deferral will be acknowledged in the permit for the source.

(d) Where planning, design, or construction of new or modified waste treatment and controls to meet prior applicable state or federal requirements is underway at the time this plan is adopted, such plans, design, or construction may be completed under the requirements in effect when the project was initiated. Upgrading to meet more stringent future requirements will be timed in accordance with section (3) of this rule.

(4) Confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are regulated under OAR 340-051-0005 through 340-051-0080 to minimize potential adverse effect on water quality (see also OAR 603-074-0005 through 603-074-0070).

(5) Programs for control of pollution from nonpoint sources when developed by the department or by other agencies pursuant to section 208 of the federal Clean Water Act and approved by the department will be incorporated into this plan by amendment via the same process used to adopt the plan unless other procedures are established by law.

(6) Where minimum requirements of federal law or enforceable regulations are more stringent than specific provisions of this plan, the federal requirements will prevail.

(7) Within the framework of statewide priorities and available resources, the department will monitor water quality within the basin for the purposes of evaluating conformance with the plan and developing information for additions or updates.

(8) The commission recognizes that the potential exists for conflicts between water quality management plans and the land use plans and resource management plans that local governments and other agencies are required to develop. If conflicts develop, the department will meet with the local governments or responsible agencies to resolve the conflicts. Revisions will be presented for adoption via the same process used to adopt the plan unless other specific procedures are established by law.

(9) The department will calculate and include effluent limits specified in pounds per day, which will be the mass load limits for biochemical oxygen demand or carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand and total suspended solids in National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits issued to all sewage treatment facilities. These limits must be calculated as follows.

(a) Except as noted in paragraph (H) of this subsection, the following requirements apply to existing facilities and to facilities receiving departmental approval for engineering plans and specifications for new treatment facilities or treatment facilities expanding the average dry weather treatment capacity before June 30, 1992:

(A) During periods of low stream flows (approximately May 1 through October 31), the monthly average mass load expressed as pounds per day may not exceed the applicable monthly concentration effluent limit times the design average dry weather flow expressed in million gallons per day times 8.34. The weekly average mass load expressed as pounds per day may not exceed the monthly average mass load times 1.5. The daily mass load expressed in pounds per day may not exceed the monthly average mass load times 2.0.

(B) During the period of high stream flows (approximately November 1 through April 30), the monthly average mass load expressed as pounds per day may not exceed the monthly concentration effluent limit times the design average wet weather flow expressed in million gallons per day times 8.34. The weekly average mass load expressed as pounds per day may not exceed the monthly average mass load times 1.5. The daily mass load expressed in pounds per day may not exceed the monthly average mass load times 2.0.

(C) On any day that the daily flow to a sewage treatment facility exceeds the lesser hydraulic capacity of the secondary treatment portion of the facility or twice the design average dry weather flow, the daily mass load limit does not apply. The permittee must operate the treatment facility at highest and best practicable treatment and control.

(D) The design average wet weather flow used in calculating mass loads must be approved by the department in accordance with prudent engineering practice and must be based on a facility plan approved by the department, engineering plans and specifications approved by the department, or an engineering evaluation. The permittee must submit documentation describing and supporting the design average wet weather flow with the permit application, application for permit renewal, or modification request or upon request by the department. The design average wet weather flow is defined as the average flow between November 1 and April 30 when the sewage treatment facility is projected to be at design capacity for that portion of the year.

(E) Mass loads assigned as described in paragraphs (B) and (C) of this subsection will not be subject to OAR 340-041-0004(9);

(F) Mass loads as described in this rule will be included in permits upon renewal or upon a request for permit modification.

(G) Within 180 days after permit renewal or modification, a permittee receiving higher mass loads under this rule and having a separate sanitary sewer system must submit to the department for review and approval a proposed program and time schedule for identifying and reducing inflow. The program must include the following:

(i) Identification of all overflow points and verification that sewer system overflows are not occurring up to a 24-hour, five-year storm event or equivalent;

(ii) Monitoring of all pump station overflow points;

(iii) A program for identifying and removing all inflow sources into the permit holder’s sewer system over which the permit holder has legal control; and

(iv) For those permit holders not having the necessary legal authority for all portions of the sewer system discharging into the permit holder’s sewer system or treatment facility, a program and schedule for gaining legal authority to require inflow reduction and a program and schedule for removing inflow sources.

(H) Within one year after the department’s approval of the program, the permit holder must begin implementation of the program.

(I) Paragraphs (A) through (G) of this subsection do not apply to the cities of Athena, Elgin, Adair Village, Halsey, Harrisburg, Independence, Carlton, and Sweet Home. Mass load limits have been individually assigned to these facilities.

(b) For new sewage treatment facilities or treatment facilities expanding the average dry weather treatment capacity and receiving engineering plans and specifications approval from the department after June 30, 1992, the mass load limits must be calculated by the department based on the proposed treatment facility capabilities and the highest and best practicable treatment to minimize the discharge of pollutants.

(c) Mass load limits as defined in this rule may be replaced by more stringent limits if required by waste load allocations established in accordance with a TMDL for treatment facilities discharging to water quality limited streams or if required to prevent or eliminate violations of water quality standards.

(d) If the design average wet weather flow or the hydraulic secondary treatment capacity is not known or has not been approved by the department at the time of permit issuance, the permit must include as interim mass load limits the mass load limits in the previous permit issued to the permit holder for the treatment facility. The permit must also include a requirement that the permit holder submit to the department the design average wet weather flow and hydraulic secondary treatment capacity within 12 months after permit issuance. Upon review and approval of the design flow information, the department will modify the permit and include mass load limits as described in subsection (a) of this section.

(e) Each permit holder with existing sewage treatment facilities otherwise subject to subsection (a) of this section may choose mass load limits calculated as follows:

(A) The monthly average mass load expressed as pounds per day may not exceed the applicable monthly concentration effluent limit times the design average dry weather flow expressed in million gallons per day times 8.34 pounds per gallon.

(B) The weekly average mass load expressed as pounds per day may not exceed the monthly average mass load times 1.5.

(C) The daily mass load expressed in pounds per day may not exceed the monthly average mass load times 2.0. If existing mass load limits are retained by the permit holder, the terms and requirements of subsection (a) of this section do not apply.

(f) The commission may grant exceptions to subsection (a) of this section. In allowing increased discharged loads, the commission must make the findings specified in OAR 340-041-0004(9)(a) for waste loads and the following findings:

(A) Mass loads calculated in subsection (a) of this section cannot be achieved with the existing treatment facilities operated at maximum efficiency at projected design flows; and

(B) There are no practicable alternatives to achieving the mass loads as calculated in subsection (a) of this section.

(12) Testing methods. The analytical testing methods for determining compliance with the water quality standards in this rule must comply with 40 CFR Part 136 or, if Part 136 does not prescribe a method, with the most recent edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Waste Water published jointly by the American Public Health Association, American Water Works Association, and Water Pollution Control Federation; if the department has published an applicable superseding method, testing must comply with the superseding method. Testing in accordance with an alternative method must comply with this rule if the department has published the method or has approved the method in writing.

(13) Reservoirs or managed lakes are deemed in compliance with water quality criteria for temperature, pH, or dissolved oxygen (DO) if all of the following circumstances exist.

(a) The water body has thermally stratified naturally or due to the presence of an impoundment.

(b) The water body has three observable layers, defined as the epilimnion, metalimnion, and hypolimnion.

(c) A layer exists in the reservoir or managed lake in which temperature, pH, and DO criteria are all met, and the layer is sufficient to support beneficial uses.

(d) All practicable measures have been taken by the entities responsible for management of the reservoir or managed lake to maximize the layers meeting the temperature, pH, and DO criteria.

(e) One of the following conditions is met:

(A) The streams or river segments immediately downstream of the water body meet applicable criteria for temperature, pH, and DO.

(B) All practicable measures have been taken to maximize downstream water quality potential and fish passage.

(C) If the applicable criteria are not met in the stream or river segment immediately upstream of the water body, then no further measurable downstream degradation of water quality has taken place due to stratification of the reservoir or managed lake.

(14) Compliance schedules. In a permit issued under OAR 340, division 045 or in a water quality certification under OAR 340, division 48, the department may include compliance schedules for the implementation of effluent limits derived from water quality criteria in this division. A compliance schedule in an NPDES permit is allowed only for water quality based effluent limits that are newly applicable to the permit and must comply with provisions in 40 CFR ¦122.47 (including the requirement that water quality criteria must be achieved as soon as possible).

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468B.030, 468B.035 & 468B.048

Stats. Implemented: ORS 468B.030, 468B.035 & 468B.048

Hist.: DEQ 17-2003, f. & cert. ef. 12-9-03; DEQ 3-2004, f. & cert. ef. 5-28-04; DEQ 10-2011, f. & cert. ef. 7-13-11; DEQ 5-2013, f. & cert. ef. 6-21-13

Notes
1.) This online version of the OREGON BULLETIN is provided for convenience of reference and enhanced access. The official, record copy of this publication is contained in the original Administrative Orders and Rulemaking Notices filed with the Secretary of State, Archives Division. Discrepancies, if any, are satisfied in favor of the original versions. Use the OAR Revision Cumulative Index found in the Oregon Bulletin to access a numerical list of rulemaking actions after November 15, 2012.

2.) Copyright 2013 Oregon Secretary of State: Terms and Conditions of Use

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